CEHD News Jodie Gustafson

CEHD News Jodie Gustafson

OLPD student’s remarkable return to hockey after brain surgery and autoimmune disease diagnosis

Taylor Williamson, a junior double majoring in Human Resource Development and Business and Marketing Education in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), scored a goal in the 3-1 win against Wisconsin to claim the 2018 WCHA Final Faceoff championship. A triumphant comeback after she underwent brain surgery and was diagnosed with the autoimmune disease, Myasthenia Gravis (MG), in the last year.

Her story is highlighted in the following news articles:

After Autoimmune Disease, Taylor Williamson Battles Back into NCAA Tournament
Minnesota Miracle, Part II: Gophers Forward Taylor Williamson Returns to Ice Following Brain Surgery
Taylor Williamson ‘Overcame the Impossible’ to Get Back to the Gophers
For the Gophers’ Williamson, It’s Not Over Yet
Gophers Women’s Hockey Forward Taylor Williamson Battled Health Issues to Play Again

Video from Channel 5 News – KSTP.com

Jang receives AERA-REAPA’s 2018 outstanding dissertation award

Sung Tae Jang has been selected to receive the 2018 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Special Interest Group: Research on the Education of Asian and Pacific Americans (REAPA) for his dissertation, Student Experiences and Educational Outcomes of Southeast Asian Female Secondary School Students in the United States: A Critical Quantitative Intersectionality Analysis.

This award recognizes a scholar whose dissertation has had a significant impact on our understanding of Asian American and/or Pacific Islanders in education and will be presented in April at the annual business meeting in New York City.

Sung Tae is a doctoral student in the educational policy and leadership track in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD).



Kim and Yoo win Cutting Edge Awards at the Academy of Human Resource Development annual conference

Sehoon Kim, assistant professor (pictured), and Sangok Yoo, a 3rd year doctoral student studying human resource development, both received Cutting Edge awards from the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) for their outstanding papers at the 2018 annual conference held February 14-17 in Richmond, VA.

Workaholics, Addiction, and Motivation: A Critical Review and Implications for HRD by Sehoon Kim

Knowledge Creation Practices of Teachers in South Korea and the United States: A Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling Analysis by Sangok Yoo (University of Minnesota), Shinhee Jeong (Texas A&M University), Ji Hoon Song (Hanyang University), and Sanghoon Bae (Sungkyunkwon University)


Chapman awarded honorary fellow status for the Comparative and International Education Society

David Chapman, professor emeritus in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), has been awarded Honorary Fellow status for the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES). This award honors senior members of the society who, through a period of life-long service and contribution to the field of comparative and international education as evidenced by scholarship, teaching, research and technical service, have advanced the field qualitatively and significantly. He will be honored at the 2019 CIES Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Chaudhuri served as a coordinator and presenter at Academy of Human Resource Development’s international research conference

Sanghamitra Chaudhuri,  lecturer in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD),  recently returned from an international research conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) which was held in Ahmedabad, India. Sanghamitra was one of the conference coordinators and presented three papers co-written with OLPD colleagues, Alexandre Ardichvilli, professor, and Sehoon Kim, assistant professor. OLPD was well represented with faculty members, Kenneth Bartlett and Louis Quast, presenting their papers along with many doctoral students. Sanghamitra was invited to write a report on AHRD digest about the conference.

Ardichvili and Collins receive awards from the Academy of Human Resource Development

Two faculty members from the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD) have received awards from the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). The awards will be presented during the annual AHRD International Research Conference in the Americas taking place February 14-17, 2018 in Richmond, VA.

Alexandre Ardichvili, professor, received the R. Wayne Pace HRD Book of the Year Award presented for an outstanding HRD book that advances the theory and/or practice of the profession. Several chapters  in the book were co-authored by OLPD doctoral students, Loi Nguyen and Victoria Jonathan, Ph.D. candidates specializing in human resource development, and Emmanuel Osafo, a recent graduate who was doctoral student at the time of publication.

Ardichvili, A., & Dirani, K. (Eds.). (2017). Leadership development in emerging market economies. NY: Palgrave Macmillan.  

Joshua Collins, assistant professor, received the Early Career Scholar Award, as an outstanding HRD scholar in the early stages of his career who has made identifiable and significant contributions in scholarly research to the field of HRD, and the 2017 Award for Outstanding Issue of Advances in Developing Human Resources.


DeJaeghere presents on new book “Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens”

Joan DeJaeghere, professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was invited to present her new book, Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens, at the University of Dar es Salaam’s Institute of Development Studies in Tanzania, and she presented at a book panel at the African Studies Association in Chicago in November. The book is a critical examination of how entrepreneurship and livelihood programs are implemented for youth, and considers how neoliberal influences on education are being reshaped in local contexts.

DeJaeghere conducts seminars for Vietnam Institute of Education Sciences

Joan DeJaeghere, professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD) and co-principal investigator of the Research on Improving Education Systems in Vietnam (RISE), gave a one week seminar in October, 2017 on conducting qualitative research in schools and classrooms to researchers from the Vietnam Institute of Education Sciences (VNIES), a partner in the RISE project. In December, she gave another one week seminar to researchers from VNIES on analyzing qualitative data – interviews and classroom observations. While the main purpose of the seminars was to support the research of RISE, it also offers a group of Vietnamese researchers continuing professional development in the area of qualitative research.

Vavrus and Demerath were plenary speakers at CIES

Dr. Frances VavrusFran Vavrus,  professor, and Peter Demerath, associate professor, in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), were both plenary speakers at the Comparative and International Education Fall Symposium held on October 26-27 at George Mason University. Their panels addressed the theme of the symposium, Interrogating and Innovating CIE Research, by focusing on the legacies of colonialism in educational research and on methodologies that offer alternative approaches to knowledge production. OLPD alumna Laura Willemsen and Ph.D. student Richard Bamattre also presented a paper at the conference on their innovative approaches to teaching comparative education at UM.

Seashore gives keynote at Nordic Educational Conference

Karen Seashore, Regents professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was in Norway last month, where she worked with school district leaders and school development agencies, gave a keynote presentation at the Nordic Educational Conference, and presented to 130 participants in a school leader preparation program.


Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI) launching e-book series

With pleasure I introduce the Program Evaluation Series, an occasional publication of the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI), which has its home in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD) at the University of Minnesota. Owing to the lengthy history of its evaluation training programs (extending back to the late 1960s when the field originated), the University of Minnesota has a strong reputation for evaluation, both nationally and internationally. For over two decades, MESI has sponsored exceptional professional development on program evaluation* and provided graduate students hands-on opportunities to hone their skills on evaluation projects in a variety of organizations. This new endeavor, the Program Evaluation Series, seeks to broaden the number of people who can benefit from MESI activities by providing high quality, up-to-date, and affordable materials on critical developments in the field.

Why now? There are three reasons we are launching the e-book series at
this time:

  • As the field of evaluation continues to grow around the world, it increasingly relies on on-line electronic materials to keep people current. The benefit of a series of e-books is clear since these books can be downloaded and re-produced for only the cost of the printing or formally printed for a nominal fee.
  • The practice of program evaluation is a growing activity internationally, and the number of novice evaluators and people conducting evaluations who do not consider themselves professional evaluators is expanding. Knowing that only a small number of colleagues nationally and globally are able to attend trainings in person, this series of e-books will enable MESI to provide useful materials to a broader array of individuals engaged in the field.
  • An e-book series provides a vehicle for dispersing innovative evaluation content stemming both from academic settings like universities and, equally important, from the world of practice, including the multiple communities in which evaluators ply their trade. Practicing evaluators, many of whom write weekly or monthly blogs, routinely develop materials that they would like to share widely. The Program Evaluation Series provides a mechanism for such dissemination.

We hope you find this publication of value to your evaluation practice and sincerely invite your feedback (mesi@umn.edu) and suggestions for additional volumes.

Jean A. King, PhD
Director, MESI

DeJaeghere conducts presentations on new book “Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens: Neoliberalism and Youth Livelihoods”

Joan DeJaeghere,  professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), recently presented her new book, Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens: Neoliberalism and Youth Livelihoods, a publication resulting from the MasterCard Foundation project on youth livelihoods, to several audiences in South Africa. She presented at an author meets critic session at the Human Development and Capability Approach annual conference in Cape Town. She then presented to a group of graduate students at Nelson Mandela University in Port Elizabeth, a group affiliated with the Chair for Youth Unemployment, Employability and Empowerment. Finally, she presented her work to graduate students at the Institute for Social Development at the University of Western Cape. The issue of entrepreneurship education that Joan critically takes up in the book is of great interest to scholars, practitioners and policymakers in South Africa because the government is engaging in many entrepreneurship initiatives to address unemployment and poverty.

Weerts quoted in Star Tribune article about University of the People’s free tuition

David Weerts, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was quoted in the Star Tribune article “Free tuition draws Minnesota students to University of the People.”

“What remains to be seen is how the marketplace will respond in hiring University of the People graduates,” he said. He also wonders how a school could survive without paying instructors (Reshef says they receive honoraria of $3 an hour.) “I was surprised that they could find that many volunteers to actually teach,” said Weerts.


ICI receives $10 million grant from US Department of Education

Congratulations to the Institute on Community Integration and David Johnson, Director, for receiving a $10M grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. This five-year cooperative agreement aims to establish the National Technical Assistance Center on Inclusive Practices and Policies. Sheryl Lazarus, Principal Investigator and Kristi Liu, Co-Principal Investigator.

Demerath elected president of Council on Anthropology and Education

Peter Demerath, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), has been elected president of the Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE). A section of the American Anthropological Association, CAE was founded in 1968 to support scholarship on “schooling in social and cultural contexts, and on human learning both inside and outside of schools.” Its mission is “to advance anti-oppressive, socially equitable, and racially just solutions to educational problems through research using anthropological perspectives, theories, methods, and findings.”

Peter wins award for his collection of short fiction

Gary Peter, lecturer in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), has written a collection of short fiction, Oranges, which has been named the winner of the 2016 Many Voices Project Competition in Prose sponsored by New Rivers Press. The national competition promotes the work of new and emerging writers, with one prize given each year in prose and one in poetry. The prize includes a $1,000 honorarium as well as publication of his manuscript in fall 2018.

Two OLPD graduate students awarded Spencer Dissertation Fellowship from National Academy of Education

Elisheva Cohen and Anna Kaiper, graduate students in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), have been awarded 2017 Spencer Dissertation Fellowships from the National Academy of Education. This fellowship “seeks to encourage a new generation of scholars from a wide range of disciplines and professional fields to undertake research relevant to the improvement of education. These $27,500 fellowships support individuals whose dissertations show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, analysis, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world.”

Cohen and Kaiper are both Ph.D. candidates studying comparative and international development education. Cohen’s dissertation research, funded by a Fulbright Fellowship, employs ethnographic methods to examine the ways in which educational programs foster inclusive environments for Syrian refugees and country nationals in Jordan. Kaiper’s dissertation surrounds the English language learning of South African domestic workers drawing from both a postcolonial and poststructural framework.

DeJaeghere presents on new book “Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens” in Tanzania

Joan DeJaeghere, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), recently presented on her new book to faculty and graduate students of Agricultural Economics and Business Studies at Sokoine University of Agriculture in Morogoro, Tanzania. Morogoro is one of the sites for the study discussed in her book, Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens: Neoliberalism and Youth Livelihoods in Tanzania (Routledge). Her presentation and the book ask the question of how global discourses related to entrepreneurship education that aim to reduce youth unemployment and poverty get adapted and reshaped in local social and economic contexts of Tanzania. It examines how entrepreneurship education is reshaping the purpose of education for citizenship – that of engaging in work that allows youth to supposedly get out of poverty. But such entrepreneurship education doesn’t necessarily ensure these youth get out of poverty; however, additional education/training for marginalized youth can change the social relations that exclude them because they haven’t completed their education or worked in the formal labor market. We found in this study that it gives marginalized youth additional credentials to be “skilled people” and allows them to contribute, even minimally, to the economic wellbeing of the community. The book is based on research in partnership with the MasterCard Foundation’s Learn, Earn and Save Initiative, for which Joan serves as PI.

Ardichvili receives AHRD’s Best International Paper Award

Alexandre Ardichvili,  professor in the Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), received the Best International Paper Award at the 18th International Conference on Human Resource Development held by the Academy of Human Resource Development in Lisbon, Portugal. The paper, titled “Focus on Demi-Gods or We’re All One Team: Talent Management in a Collectivist Culture,” was co-authored with practitioners from a Brazilian business organization and faculty members from the University of Sao Paulo.

Bartlett receives Meritorious Service Award from UCWHRE

Ken Bartlett, associate dean in the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) and professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was awarded the Meritorious Service Award at the University Council for Workforce and Human Resource Education (UCWHRE) annual conference. This UCWHRE award “recognizes a faculty member from a member institution each year for long-term and high-impact service to the Council and the profession.”