All posts by Jodie Gustafson

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OLPD

Two OLPD graduate students awarded Spencer Dissertation Fellowship from National Academy of Education

Elisheva Cohen and Anna Kaiper, graduate students in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), have been awarded 2017 Spencer Dissertation Fellowships from the National Academy of Education. This fellowship “seeks to encourage a new generation of scholars from a wide range of disciplines and professional fields to undertake research relevant to the improvement of education. These $27,500 fellowships support individuals whose dissertations show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, analysis, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world.”

Elishcova and Anna are both Ph.D. candidates studying comparative and international development education. Elishcova’s dissertation research, funded by a Fulbright Fellowship, employs ethnographic methods to examine the ways in which educational programs foster inclusive environments for Syrian refugees and country nationals in Jordan. Anna’s dissertation surrounds the English language learning of South African domestic workers drawing from both a postcolonial and poststructural framework.

DeJaeghere presents on new book “Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens” in Tanzania

Joan DeJaeghere, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), recently presented on her new book to faculty and graduate students of Agricultural Economics and Business Studies at Sokoine University of Agriculture in Morogoro, Tanzania. Morogoro is one of the sites for the study discussed in her book, Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens: Neoliberalism and Youth Livelihoods in Tanzania (Routledge). Her presentation and the book ask the question of how global discourses related to entrepreneurship education that aim to reduce youth unemployment and poverty get adapted and reshaped in local social and economic contexts of Tanzania. It examines how entrepreneurship education is reshaping the purpose of education for citizenship – that of engaging in work that allows youth to supposedly get out of poverty. But such entrepreneurship education doesn’t necessarily ensure these youth get out of poverty; however, additional education/training for marginalized youth can change the social relations that exclude them because they haven’t completed their education or worked in the formal labor market. We found in this study that it gives marginalized youth additional credentials to be “skilled people” and allows them to contribute, even minimally, to the economic wellbeing of the community. The book is based on research in partnership with the MasterCard Foundation’s Learn, Earn and Save Initiative, for which Joan serves as PI.

Bartlett receives Meritorious Service Award from UCWHRE

Ken Bartlett, associate dean in the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) and professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was awarded the Meritorious Service Award at the University Council for Workforce and Human Resource Education (UCWHRE) annual conference. This UCWHRE award “recognizes a faculty member from a member institution each year for long-term and high-impact service to the Council and the profession.”

Shirazi spoke about reconfiguring representations at Columbia University

Roozbeh Shirazi, assistant professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), spoke on Reconfiguring Representations of The Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia as part of a special panel at Columbia University. His presentation explored the politics of representation in the classroom at a time of heightened political tensions between the US and Iran. It featured ethnographic research he carried out in the Twin Cities that addressed pedagogical challenges and possibilities in how English teachers approach the graphic novel Persepolis with students. The panel was sponsored by Teachers College, the Middle East Institute of Columbia University, and the Department of Social Studies Education at Teachers College.

OLPD Ph.D. student wins NODA grant for rural student retention research

Keelin Yenney, a Ph.D. student studying higher education in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD),  has been awarded a grant from the National Association for Orientation, Transfer, and Retention (NODA) for her research regarding the retention of rural students.

“Social Capital and Sense of Belonging: Exploring Assigned Academic Advising as a Retention Tool for Rural Students”
The purpose of this study is to explore how rural students experience assigned academic advising as a tool to develop social capital and sense of belonging in an urban college environment and the ways these experiences influence retention.

Jehangir gave keynote address at UCLA’s Inaugural First Generation Institute

Rashné Jehangir, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), gave the keynote address for Inaugural First Generation Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) held May 4-5. Jehangir’s talk was on Purposeful Pioneers: First Generation College Students in Higher Education.

Chaudhuri quoted in HR magazine regarding reverse mentoring research

Sanghamitra Chaudhuri, lecturer in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was recently quoted about her research in the article How HR Can Support Reverse Mentoring in HR Magazine, which is one of the most widely read human resource professional publications.

“As for program design, companies should build programs based on what leaders will learn that will help the company, says Sanghamitra Chaudhuri, a University of Minnesota lecturer in organizational policy and leadership development who has been studying reverse mentoring since 2012.”

Vavrus gives talk at National Conference on Teacher Training in Tanzania

Dr. Frances VavrusFrances Vavrus, professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), participated in the National Conference on Teacher Training in Tanzania during the first week of April and gave a talk entitled The Local Picture: Contextual Considerations for Teacher Training in Tanzania. The conference was attended by representatives of the Tanzanian Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology, the World Bank, Save the Children, Peace Corps, and a number of Tanzanian universities and non-governmental organizations.  Dr. Vavrus has been involved in teacher professional development in Tanzania since 2006 as a facilitator and researcher studying the changing educational policy landscape in the country as it affects teachers’ lives.

Vavrus cowrites art of storytelling article in University World News

Dr. Frances VavrusFrances Vavrus, professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), and her colleague at the University of Wisconsin, Lesley Bartlett, have an article in the most recent issue of University World News entitled “Why academics need to learn the art of storytelling.” They argue that the spread of ‘alternative facts’ makes it even more important for academics to ensure their research is accessible to the general public. They explain how the writing of compelling personal stories about our research participants and our own research journeys can enhance the accessibility of scholarship.

In memorium: Clifford Hooker

Clifford Hooker, professor emeritus and a national expert in school law, passed away on November 15, 2016, in St. Paul at the age of 96. Hooker was known as a master teacher, mentoring students and fostering internships, always engaged in the community and statewide. He authored The Courts and Education published in 1978 and conceived of—then served 30 years as the chair of the editorial advisory committee for—West’s Education Law Reporter.

Professor Hooker was born in Illinois, the son of a sharecropper and a mother who ensured he was able to attend the local one-room school. As valedictorian of McClure High School’s class of ’38, he received free tuition to attend teachers college. He graduated and married his first wife, Avelyn, in 1941, before serving in the Navy aboard the USS Massachusetts in the Pacific. In the post-war years their children Sherrill and Donn were born, and he worked in Illinois public education as a shop teacher, principal, and superintendent. He completed his Ed.D. at Indiana University in 1955 and a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia University before taking his first academic position at the University of Pittsburgh.

In 1958, Clifford Hooker joined the U of M faculty, from 1964 to 1972 chairing the Department of Educational Administration, which would become what is now the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD). He founded the Educational Administration doctoral track and was influential in a 1965 restructuring of the college that reduced hierarchy and fostered faculty participation in decision-making. He also helped to found the Midwest Council for Educational Administration in 1971 in response to changes in licensing requirements for Minnesota school administrators. MCEA included higher education institutions from North and South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Manitoba, and Minnesota.

Professor Hooker was active in many sports before it was popular to stay fit, including biking, tennis, jogging, barefoot waterskiing, golfing, and downhill skiing. He designed and built a cabin on Pelican Lake in 1965 and shared it for departmental retreats. He also got his colleagues to join him in canoeing in the boundary waters. Officially retiring in 1991, he remained active in the field, consulting widely and supporting educational leadership.

He is survived by his wife, Leslie Gerstman, their daughter Sarah, and two grandchildren.

Gifts in memory of Professor Clifford Hooker may be made to the Educational Evaluation and Policy Studies Fellowship, Fund #6027, University of Minnesota Foundation.

Five OLPD alumni win dissertation awards

Five alumni from the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development have recently won dissertation awards.

Matt Schuelka (EDPA PhD-comparative and international development education, 2014) has received the 2017 South Asia SIG Best Dissertation Award from the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES). His dissertation, entitled Constructing Disability in Bhutan: Schools, Structures, Policies, and Global Discourses, used a vertical (comparative) case study approach to explore the multiple levels of policy-making that have shaped inclusive education discourse and practice in Bhutan. This year-long ethnographic study, which involved participant-observation, interviewing, and critical policy analysis, has served as the basis for an edited book about education in Bhutan and numerous journal articles published by Dr. Schuelka during the past few years.

Anna Farrell (EDPA PhD-comparative and international development education, 2017) has received the 2017 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Language Issues Special Interest Group from the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES). Her dissertation, entitled There Is No Nation without a Language (Ní tír gan teanga): Language Policy and the Irish Dancing Commission, raises important questions about how language policy affects cultural and political identity, particularly in post-colonial contexts like Ireland.  Dr. Farrell will be honored at the CIES meeting in March in Atlanta.

Leonard Taylor (EDPA PhD-higher education, 2016) is the First Place 2017 Doctoral Student Awardee bestowed by the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education (AABHE) for his dissertation entitled Organizational Learning for Student Success: Exploring the Roles of Institutional Actors.

Corbyn Smyth (EdD-higher education, 2016) has received the Dissertation of the Year Award from the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) for his dissertation entitled Where All May Meet on Common Ground: Elements of College Unions Evident in Campus Community. Dr. Smyth will be honored at the awards ceremony during the 2017 annual conference in Philadelphia held March 21st.

Molly Wickam (WHRE PhD, higher education, 2015) has received the Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation award from the Association for Research in Business Education (ARBE) for her dissertation entitled Enhancing Employability Skills in Graduate Business Programs: Service-Learning in Capstone Courses. Dr. Wickam will present at the 2017 Business Education Conference on April 12th.

 

Stebleton and Jehangir make first-year experience presentation at UMN’s Focusing on Student Success Conference

Michael Stebleton and Rashne Jehangir, associate professors in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), presented recently at the University of Minnesota’s Focusing on Student Success Conference.  Their presentation, Empowering Students through High Impact Practices, focused on the highlights of the College of Education and Human Development’s first-year experience program.  Specifically, they showcased examples of students’ work including documentary short films.

OLPD graduate student receives Mestenhauser Student Award for Excellence

Takehito Kamata, a Ph.D. student (higher education track) in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), is a recipient of the Mestenhauser Student Award for Excellence in Campus Internationalization recognizing outstanding student contributions to international education. Kamata will receive his award at a ceremony held on March 3, 2017.

 

Read more and RSVP.

Johnstone awarded Global Programs and Strategy Alliance international travel grant

Christopher Johnstone, assistant professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was awarded a Global Programs and Strategy Alliance international travel grant and will be engaging in a series of meetings related to inclusive education with scholars from University of Western Cape, University of South Africa, University of Free State, and the Western Cape Provincial Government.

Seashore presents keynote at ICSEI Conference

Karen Seashore,  Regents professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), presented a keynote address entitled Collaborative Partnerships for System-Wide Improvement: Framing the Narrative at the International Congress of School Effectiveness and Improvement (ICSEI) in Ottawa, Canada, in January.

Romina Madrid, post-doctoral associate at CAREI, presented as part of a symposium on Place, identity and belonging in a changing world: Exploring contemporary issues for policy, practice and leadership.

OLPD alumna wins CIES outstanding dissertation award

Laura Willemsen, alumna (Ph.D. 2016) and lecturer in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), has won the 2016-17 Gail P. Kelly Award for her dissertation, Embodying Empowerment: Gender, Schooling, Relationships and Life History in Tanzania.

This award of the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) is conferred on an outstanding Ph.D. or Ed.D. dissertation that manifests academic excellence; originality; methodological, theoretical, and empirical rigor; and that deals with issues of social justice and equity in international settings. These issues may include—but are not limited to—gender, race, class, ethnicity, and nationality.

The committee wrote the following assessment of Dr. Willemsen’s dissertation:

“This is a solid piece of academic work engaging with ethnographic realities which clearly paints a scenario of gender disparity and the fundamental role that education should play in ameliorating the current status quo. It examines the role schooling has played in empowering young women from vulnerability toward increasing security and well-being. The study illustrates how school needs to include an element of care to be successful, particularly in marginalized women’s lives, underscoring how quality education moves beyond what can be measured through traditional indicators such as academic performance. Through her study, Willemsen critically engages with prominent discourses in the field of comparative and international education, for example the role of education in empowering of marginalized groups (here young women in a low-income country), yet also underscoring how the school is not necessarily the decisive factor in this empowerment, how additional forces, such as family, community and religion can play more prominent roles than education. Additionally, she put forward a critical perspective on the content of schooling, promoting a more holistic notion of education for the institution to at all be able to function as a factor for empowerment of marginalized groups. In this dissertation, the notion of empowerment as understood by researchers and development experts, and the role of education within it, is challenged through this dissertation and the young women populating it. The role of social justice is a cross-cutting issue in the dissertation by Willemsen. She also engages with central CIES discourses in a critical manner, something rather bold in a Ph.D. dissertation and in such a way contributing to academic excellence and originality.”

DeJaeghere conducted RISE-Vietnam research interviews with national policymakers

Joan DeJaeghere, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD) and co-principal investigator of the Research for Improving Education Systems in Vietnam (RISE), conducted interviews with national policymakers in January.  The research will be analyzed to understand the political-economic changes that affected Vietnamese educational successes and challenges.  One of the unique features the research aims to understand is how policies were implemented throughout the country and at local levels during a process of decentralization and “democratization” that allowed for a large expansion of educational participation and learning, while also maintaining a strong socialist ethos and commitment to equality.

Read more about RISE, a 6-year, $5.2 million research project about children’s learning throughout the world.

Vavrus and colleague publish book “Rethinking Case Study Research: A Comparative Approach”

Dr. Frances VavrusFrances Vavrus, professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), and colleague Lesley Bartlett (University of Wisconsin-Madison) have recently published the book Rethinking Case Study Research: A Comparative Approach with relevance across the fields of education and human development. The book is designed as a textbook for graduate students and other researchers seeking a more holistic approach to case study research, especially research with a focus on policy, and it has exercises in every chapter that guide readers through the research process.

The book is available at www.routledge.com (use the following promo code for a 20% discount: IRK69) or at www.amazon.com. Professor Vavrus will also be available in the fall term to speak in classes that might want to use the book.

Presidential partners study by Hendel and colleagues featured in Inside Higher Education article

Darwin Hendel, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), and his collaborators, Karen Kaler and Gwendolyn Freed, presented the results of their study “The lives of Presidential Partners in Higher Education Institutions” at The Presidents Institute at a meeting of the Council of Independent Colleges in Orlando Florida.  Their study was featured in the Inside Higher Education article “Gender Roles and Presidential Spouses.”

Furco quoted in research article comparing best college towns and cities

Andrew Furco, professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership Policy, and Development (OLPD), provided his expert insight for the WalletHub article 2016’s Best College Towns & Cities in America by Richie Bernardo.