CEHD News Steve Baker

CEHD News Steve Baker

CEHD ranks #4 among public universities in the world

The University of Minnesota’s College of Education and Human Development has been recognized as the #4 public school of education in the Academic Ranking of World Universities’ 2018 college rankings. CEHD was ranked seventh overall, among private and public universities.

More than 1,200 universities are ranked by ARWU every year and the best 500 are published.

ShanghaiRanking Consultancy, an independent organization dedicated to research on higher education, has published ARWU rankings since 2009. ARWU uses six objective indicators to rank world universities, including the number of alumni and staff winning Nobel Prizes and Fields Medals, number of highly cited researchers selected by Clarivate Analytics, number of articles published in journals of Nature and Science, number of articles indexed in Science Citation Index – Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index, and per capita performance of a university.

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CEHD researcher’s study on young people’s financial habits covered in New York Magazine

professor Joyce Serido.
Joyce Serido, associate professor and extension specialist, Family Social Science. Photo by Julie Michener.

Associate Professor Joyce Serido, Department of Family Social Science, is leading an ongoing a ten-year study of more than 2,000 students that found that financial self-efficacy correlates more strongly with subjects’ financial well-being than almost any other factor, including gender, race, and socioeconomic background. Read this story in New York Magazine.

New research shows today’s kids able to delay gratification longer than those in 1960s

Stephanie Carlson

A new study led by a University of Minnesota researcher found kids today were able to delay gratification longer than kids in the 1960s, despite predictions by adults that children now have less self-control than 50 years ago.

“Although we live in an instant gratification era where everything seems to be available immediately via smartphone or the internet, our study suggests today’s kids can delay gratification longer than children in the 1960s and 1980s,” said lead author Stephanie M. Carlson, Ph.D., a Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the College of Education and Human Development’s Institute of Child Development. “This finding stands in stark contrast with the assumption by adults that today’s children have less self-control than previous generations.”

The two-part study, published this month in the journal Developmental Psychology, measured adults’ perceptions of self-control in kids today and compared children’s performance across decades on the “Marshmallow Test,” a common research tool used to measure children’s ability to delay gratification.

The Marshmallow Test, developed by study co-author Walter Mischel, Ph.D., while at Stanford University in the 1960s, asks children to choose between taking an immediate, smaller reward – like one marshmallow – or waiting and receiving a larger award, like two marshmallows. Delaying gratification in early childhood has been linked to positive outcomes later in life, such as higher academic achievement, healthy weight, positive peer relationships and effective coping with stress.

For the first part of the study, Carlson and her colleagues conducted an online survey of 358 U.S. adults to gauge how long they thought children today would wait compared with children from the 1960s. According to the survey, 72 percent of respondents thought children today would wait for a shorter period of time and 75 percent believed that children today would have less self-control.

To test these predictions using their own data, Carlson and colleagues compared how children performed on the original Marshmallow Test in the 1960s with how children performed on replications of the test in the 1980s and 2000s. They found children who participated in studies in the 2000s waited an average of two minutes longer than those from the 1960s and one minute longer than those in the 1980s.

“That ability to wait did not appear to be due to any change in methodology, setting or geography, or the age, sex or socioeconomic status of the children,” Carlson said. “We also took steps to ensure none of the children in the 2000s group were on medication to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at the time of the study.”

According to the study’s authors, several factors may have contributed to an increase in children’s ability to delay gratification across time. “We believe increases in abstract thought, along with rising preschool enrollment, changes in parenting and, paradoxically, cognitive skills associated with screen technologies, may be contributing to generational improvements in the ability to delay gratification,” Carlson said. “But our work is far from over. Inequality persists in developmental outcomes for children in poverty.”

Carlson’s contributions to this study were supported by grant no. R03HD041473 and grant no. R01HD051495 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Read more in the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek.

Microsoft acquires Flipgrid, educational product developed by CEHD

Microsoft recently announced the acquisition of Flipgrid, a video-based discussion and reflection tool that was designed and created in CEHD by Associate Professor Charles Miller and graduate student Brad Hosack. With this acquisition, Flipgrid will be free for schools!

Flipgrid allows users to record, upload, view, react, and respond to each other’s short videos. It’s a particularly powerful tool for increasing student participation and engagement in classrooms and communities around the world.

Already serving more than 20 million users, Flipgrid access will grow even faster through Microsoft’s involvement. Flipgrid, Inc. has grown exponentially since its founding in 2015. Dean Jean Quam encouraged use of the platform for CEHD, and soon it spread across the University of Minnesota, then to schools around the country, and now the world!

“I was delighted to hear that Microsoft had bought Flipgrid and plans to expand its reach worldwide,” said Dean Quam. “And I am so proud of those within our college who pioneered this innovative technology that empowers students and helps them succeed. In CEHD we strive to take the breadth and depth of our research and find ways to apply it to close gaps in student learning and solve real-world problems in the schools. Our Educational Technology Innovations office was founded to further develop accessible products from our knowledge, and six more products are currently in the pipeline. Our culture of innovation is producing real results.”

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CEHD expertise on the dangers of child separation at the border

Megan Gunnar, Ph.D., director of the Institute of Child Development — the #1 program in developmental psychology in the nation — is an expert on how children and adolescents regulate stress and emotions. In response to the recent reports on the U.S. government policy separating children of immigrants trying to enter the U.S. illegally, Dr. Gunnar is speaking out, and she is getting worldwide attention. This forced separation can have a negative developmental impact on children far into their future, according to Dr. Gunnar.

“When children are exposed to trauma and major stressors, the most powerful means that nature has devised to protect their bodies and brains from toxic effects is the presence and availability of their parents,” she said.

Dr. Gunnar’s thought leadership on this issue has appeared in more than 40 major media stories with a total reach of more than 380 million people. Read more about this controversial issue and Dr. Gunnar’s expert analysis featured in these media outlets: Washington Post, Wall Street JournalBuzzFeed, San Francisco Chronicle, Denver Post, and Orlando Sentinel.

CEHD ranked #19 by U.S. News & World Report for graduate education

The University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) continues to climb in the latest U.S. News & World Report graduate school rankings, breaking the top 20 this year with a ranking of 19, a move up from a ranking of 21st last year.

CEHD was also recently recognized as the top public school of education in the 2017 Academic Ranking of World Universities.

For the U.S. News & World Report rankings, 385 schools that grant doctoral degrees were surveyed. Schools were rated on 10 measures including peer assessment, educational professionals’ assessment, student selectivity, faculty resources, and research activity.

“We are pleased to continue to rise in the rankings, said CEHD Dean Jean K. Quam. “It’s validation for our work moving forward in educational equity, teaching and learning innovations, and children’s mental health and development.

CEHD is a world leader in developing programs with a positive impact on child development, teaching, and learning. CEHD laboratory preschool, for example, bases its instruction on the idea that children are the agents of their own learning, encouraging hands-on, child-directed experiences. CEHD researchers bring real-world data collection to the classroom to help teachers in Minnesota and beyond. We are also developing new programs and technology, such as Check & Connect, to help educators improve student outcomes and keep at-risk kids on track to graduation.

For more information about the college, visit www.cehd.umn.edu/, where you can also find information about our top-rated master’s and doctoral programs.

The mission of the University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development is to contribute to a just and sustainable future through engagement with the local and global communities to enhance human learning and development at all stages of the life span.

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Mom Enough, U of M College of Education and Human Development team up to help kids, parents

Two organizations that are committed to healthy child development and parenting have formed a partnership to expand their promotion of easy-to-understand tips and resources for moms, dads, and professionals.

Mom Enough®, founded by Twin Cities child and family health professionals Marti and Erin Erickson, and the University of Minnesota’s College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) are joining forces to present evidence-based research on effective child-rearing at a time when myth-busting and innovative solutions are needed more than ever.

The Mom Enough/CEHD partnership will expand the dissemination of world-class research from the University of Minnesota through all Mom Enough communications, including CEHD experts featured in weekly podcasts (available on iTunes and MomEnough.com), e-newsletters, events, and social media. CEHD experts also will create new tips and resources that will be available through both University and Mom Enough websites, social media, and in print.

Mom Enough aims to provide reliable, research-based information on child development, parenting, and maternal health and well-being. Often delivered with personal anecdotes from the mother-daughter co-hosts, the information is accessible and useful for helping all moms and dads become the parents that their children need.

CEHD is focused on the value of every child as an individual with unique talents and challenges. The college features more than 180 faculty members engaged in research, teaching, and service across Minnesota and around the world. They are represented in the departments of child development; curriculum and instruction; educational psychology; family social science; kinesiology; organizational leadership, policy, and development; and social work.

“CEHD is uniquely positioned to address many of our toughest challenges in society, such as teaching and learning innovations, children’s mental health and development, family resilience, and healthy living across the lifespan,” said Dean Jean K. Quam. “This partnership with Mom Enough is another step in our efforts to collaborate with important community organizations that are dedicated to improving lives.”

Mom Enough’s Marti Erickson, who earned her master’s degree and Ph.D. from CEHD, said, “CEHD was my academic home throughout my long career at the University of Minnesota and is where I developed my passion for bringing research-based information to parents and other caring adults. So it is especially exciting for me to enter into this formal partnership to help Mom Enough’s large and diverse audience tap into CEHD’s extraordinary resources.”

For more information on this new partnership, contact Steve Baker (s-bake@umn.edu, 612-624-3430) or Stacy Downs (stacy@momenough.com, 763-234-4054).

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U of M Twin Cities education program ranks #1 among public universities in the world

The University of Minnesota’s education program in the College of Education and Human Development ranks #3 in the world, according to the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) 2017 report. Only prestigious private universities Harvard and Stanford are ranked higher, making CEHD the highest rated public education program in the world.

The results are produced by ShanghaiRanking Consultancy, an independent organization dedicated to research on higher education that has published rankings since 2009.

ARWU uses six objective indicators to rank world universities, including the number of alumni and staff winning Nobel Prizes and Fields Medals, number of highly cited researchers selected by Thomson Reuters, number of articles published in journals of Nature and Science, number of articles indexed in Science Citation Index – Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index, and per capita performance of a university.

More than 1,200 universities are ranked by ARWU every year and the best 500 are published. See more ARWU education rankings.

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CEHD embeds educational equity skills in teacher education curriculum

The College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) created the Teacher Education Redesign Initiative (TERI) in 2010 to better prepare teachers for the challenges they face in a 21st century classroom. In the seven years since TERI began, CEHD has made important changes to the teacher preparation curriculum. One of these changes is a new emphasis on teaching “dispositions,” which describe the relational skills that teachers need to connect with their students, families, and communities.

By teaching relational skills, helping teachers understand the impact of their own racial identity on their students, CEHD helps teacher candidates develop the knowledge, skills, and mindsets they need to foster educational equity in their classrooms.

Learn more in this blog post from Misty Sato, associate professor and Campbell Chair for Innovation in Teacher Development.

CEHD in top ten on student satisfaction for education schools

A new report from SR (Student Review) Education Group has the University of Minnesota’s College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) at the top of the college rankings in student satisfaction for education schools. Based on the reviews of current and former students, CEHD was rated 8th best among 19 ranked education colleges offering master’s of education degrees in the United States.

SR Education has created a standardized method to assess institutions based on student satisfaction data. The goal of SR Education is to help prospective students find a college suited to their individual needs.

Read more.

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Marion Barber Jr., Gophers Hall-of-Fame running back, earns his degree at age 57

Marion Barber Jr. at commencement ceremony

Marion Barber Jr. is persistent.

As an All-Big Ten running back for the Golden Gophers football team in the late 1970s, Barber was a record-setting player. In 2017, at age 57, Barber’s determination off the field culminated May 11 when he received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota as part of the commencement ceremonies for the College of Education and Human Development. He graduated with a major in youth studies from the School of Social Work.

Barber finished his Gophers football career as the all-time record holder for rushing yards (3,094), rushing touchdowns (34), and 100-yard rushing games (12). Those records have since been broken, but he still ranks sixth all-time in program history for total rushing yards.

All of Barber’s sons have played football for the Gophers, including former Dallas Cowboys Pro Bowl running back Marion Barber III, former Houston Texans safety Dominique Barber, and current Gophers linebacker Thomas Barber.

In fall 2015, Marion Barber Jr. started back on his academic career at the U of M, knowing he would need two years of credits to complete his degree this spring.

“Once I saw the commitment required, I decided it would be worth it,” Barber said. “And, believe it or not, the time has gone by fast and been enjoyable. I have really appreciated all of my classmates, professors, and advisers who made me feel welcomed.”

Marion Barber Jr. with his grandchildren

Barber, a Maple Grove resident, is particularly proud of his perfect attendance in all of his classes, as well as his record of mostly A’s (and a few B’s). Outside the classroom, Barber worked as an educational intern at Armstrong High School. He now has a full-time position as a special education assistant at the school. He is also an assistant football coach there.

Barber said he has always been interested in youth development and children. After nearly 40 years since beginning his time at the U of M, he feels that he has something to offer young people — especially lessons about reaching high for goals and maintaining perseverance.

See more on Marion Barber Jr. in the Star Tribune and the Pioneer Press, and on KARE 11KSTP TV, and CCX Media.

Karen Miksch wins President’s Award for Outstanding Service

Karen Miksch, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), is one of 11 people honored with the 2017 President’s Award for Outstanding Service from the University of Minnesota.

This award recognizes exceptional service to the University, its schools, colleges, departments, and service units by an active or retired faculty or staff member. Recipients of this award have gone well beyond their regular duties and have demonstrated an unusual commitment to the University community.

Miksch’s contributions to the college and University have been extraordinary through her work and consultation on legal issues, academic freedom, student admissions, and fostering diversity and inclusion in graduate education.

She will be honored at a reception at Eastcliff on June 15, and the Board of Regents will recognize her at their meeting on May 12. See all of this year’s winners.

American Academy of Arts and Sciences honors Megan Gunnar

Megan Gunnar

Megan Gunnar, director of the Institute of Child Development in the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD), has been elected to the 2017 class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is one of three University of Minnesota professors and 228 national and international scholars, artists, philanthropists, and business leaders elected this year.

Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences is one of the country’s oldest learned societies and independent policy research centers. This is the 237th class of members elected. It includes winners of the Pulitzer Prize and the Wolf Prize, MacArthur Fellows, Fields Medalists, Presidential Medal of Freedom and National Medal of Arts recipients, and Academy Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award, and Tony Award winners.

Gunnar is one of the nation’s leading researchers in child development and developmental psychobiology. Her work focuses on understanding how stress early in life “gets under the skin” to shape the body’s stress response systems and neurobehavioral development.

“Professor Gunnar is an exceptional faculty member whose research and leadership in her field has improved the lives of many children,” said Jean Quam, CEHD dean. “The University of Minnesota and the College of Education and Human Development are extremely proud of her accomplishments.”

Gunnar holds the University’s highest faculty honors as both a Regents Professor and Distinguished McKnight University Professor. She was recently elected to the National Academy of Education and has been honored with lifetime achievement awards by the American Psychological Association, Division 7 Developmental Psychology, the Society for Research in Child Development, and the Association for Psychological Science. Gunnar has a Ph.D. from Stanford University.

The 2017 class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences will be inducted at a ceremony on October 7, 2017, in Cambridge, MA.

CEHD’s top rankings reflect innovative programs, district partnerships

The University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) is ranked 12th among public professional schools of education, 21st among all schools, in the 2018 U.S. News and World Report rankings of graduate schools. CEHD maintains a #8 ranking in special education and moves up to #9 in educational psychology. CEHD’s developmental psychology program (Institute of Child Development) is #1 in the country.

CEHD is a world leader in developing innovative programs to address opportunity gaps in child development, teaching, and learning. Consider its outstanding partnership programs with school districts in Minnesota that apply evidence-based teaching methodologies to strengthen schools. Note also the impact of recent groundbreaking research on autism, which has uncovered new patterns of brain development in infants. CEHD’s productivity last year included $44.3 million of externally funded research.

“Our college continues to reach new heights of excellence in graduate teaching, research, and outreach,” said Dean Jean K. Quam. “We are focused on improving the lives of students across Minnesota, the nation, and the world.”

Learn more about CEHD’s top-rated master’s and doctoral programs.

Rankings methodology: U.S. News surveyed 379 schools granting education doctoral degrees. It calculates rankings based on quality assessments from peer institutions and school superintendents nationwide, student selectivity, and faculty research and resources, which includes student/faculty ratio and faculty awards as well as support for research.

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Large CEHD delegation travels to Cuba for conference and educational exchange

College of Education and Human Development faculty, staff, alumni, and school-based colleagues will be in Havana, Cuba, January 25 to February 4, to meet with Cuban educators and present research papers at the Pedagogía 2017 International Conference for the “Unity of Educators.” The delegation, the largest U.S. academic group to date to travel to Cuba and present at a conference, includes 17 experts in reading and literacy, second languages and culture, dual language and immersion, bilingual education, special education, access and inclusion, multicultural education, immigrant youth, and pathways to diversifying the teaching force.

Goals for the visit include sharing research and practical knowledge, and engaging with colleagues on Cuban initiatives presented by local advocates, educators, and policy makers; presenting research at the conference; and making visits to educational spaces such as the National Literacy Museum.

“When we return, we will be sharing our insights from this trip with educators across Minnesota,” said Deborah Dillon, delegation leader and associate dean for graduate and professional programs in the college.

Other members of the delegation include Laura Coffin Koch (conference organizer), Stephanie Owen-Lyons (assistant to the delegation leader), Alexander Giraldo (graduate student), Julio Cabrera Morales (graduate student), Michelle Benegas (alumna), Amy Hewitt-Olatunde (St. Paul Public Schools), Karina Elze (Minneapolis Public Schools), and the following faculty and staff from CEHD: Heidi Barajas, Martha Bigelow, Blanca Caldas Chumbes, Panayiota Kendeou, Keitha-Gail Martin-Kerr, J.B. Mayo, David O’Brien, Karla Stone, and Rose Vukovic.

The impetus for the trip came from State Senator Patricia Torres Ray, who contacted CEHD dean Jean Quam and Dillon requesting that they secure a group of diverse scholars and practitioners from the college and community for the trip. Senator Torres Ray planned to join the delegation but was unable to leave her work at the statehouse to travel during the legislative session.

View photos and read more about the trip in the Spring/Summer 2017 issue of Connect.

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Lee receives CDC grant for app to aid HPV vaccine completion

Professor Hee Yun Lee, School of Social Work, is principal investigator for a $450,000 Special Interest Project Research grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The grant will fund a mobile application intervention for low-income Hmong adolescents to facilitate completion of the HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine series. The research team includes community co-principal investigator Kathleen Culhane-Pera, M.D., medical director of the Westside Community Health Services, and co-investigator Jay Desai, Ph.D., research investigator at HealthPartners.

The team will use community based participatory action research to design an app tailored culturally and cognitively to low-income Hmong adolescents aged 11-17 years and their parents. HPV causes several types of cancers, but vaccines can prevent infection with the most common types of HPV. The vaccine is given in three shots over seven to eight months.

The app will be highly interactive, with multiple levels of participation. The researchers will also test the app’s effectiveness and establish a protocol to aid health care providers in identifying and engaging Hmong adolescents and their parents in its use.

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CEHD faculty address issues of politics, policy, and discourse in U.S. democracy

PrintFaculty in the College of Education and Human Development are engaged in diverse areas of research, teaching, and service in the community. As they look ahead, many of them are expressing insights and creating communities of discussion to improve all lives in this country and around the world.

Here is a sampling of some of their viewpoints that have been published:

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CEHD tennis racket study leads to new product for Wilson Sporting Goods Co.

Global sporting goods manufacturer Wilson Sporting Goods Company introduced a new line of high-technology performance tennis rackets that were field-tested in the School of Kinesiology’s Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL) directed by Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D. The participants were experts recruited from the U of M varsity tennis men’s and women’s teams, and testing took place at the U of M Tennis Center.

UofM Varsity tennis player during data collection.
U of M varsity tennis player monitored by HSCL.

In tennis, the ball hitting the racket during tennis strokes induces a vibration of the racket frame, which transfers to the arm of the players. High vibration transfer may cause discomfort, induce earlier onset of fatigue and, with repeated exposure, increases injury risk. A racket design that can effectively reduce vibration transfer from the racket to the player’s arm should mitigate these negative vibration effects and aid to stabilize or improve a player’s performance.

Thus Wilson used Countervail technology, a one-of-a-kind layered carbon fiber that was originally designed for the aerospace industry to dissipate vibrational energy in airplanes. Strategic amounts of this material were incorporated into their new Blade performance tennis racket. HSCL measured the vibration in the rackets and determined how much these vibrations transferred to the arm, then compared the vibration behavior of this new design to another commercially available racket. In addition, the electrical signals from several  arm muscles  were recorded during the play to obtain electrophysiological markers of muscle fatigue.

A main finding of the study is that the new Countervail technology effectively reduces the vibration at the racket, which potentially can help players play longer while maintaining the precision of their strokes.

Read about the announcement on the 10sBalls.com blog.

HSCL Tennis Racquet Study – 20161209 from CEHD Academics on Vimeo.

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J.B. Mayo wins Josie Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award

mayojr-2011J.B. Mayo, associate professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, received the Josie R. Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award at the University of Minnesota Equity and Diversity Breakfast on Nov. 17.

The Josie R. Johnson Award was established in honor of Dr. Josie R. Johnson in recognition of her lifelong contributions to human rights and social justice, which guided her work with the civil rights movement, years of community service, and tenure at the University. The award honors University faculty, staff, and students who, through their principles and practices, exemplify Dr. Johnson’s standard of excellence in creating respectful and inclusive living, learning, and working environments.

Mayo was recognized for his dedication to equity and social justice in schools. Colleagues noted, in particular, his scholarship and outreach related to LGBTQ youth and teachers and his support for LGBTQ communities of color in school and community settings. Read more about Dr. Mayo.

Learn more about past award recipients.

University autism expertise leads to earlier diagnosis

jedandjason
Jed Elison and Jason Wolff

CEHD researchers Jason Wolff and Jed Elison are detecting objective differences in the brains of children who have autism spectrum disorders as early as six months old. And their work is contributing to a national effort to understand this complex array of developmental disorders.

“We know from intervention studies that the earlier you intervene, the better the outcome,” says Wolff in a U of M Medical Bulletin feature story.

Read more about the work of several U of M researchers who bring a spectrum of expertise to their autism research, including prevalence studies led by Amy Hewitt, director of CEHD’s Research and Training Center on Community Living in the Institute on Community Integration.