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Kinesiology

Kinesiology’s Richardson panelist at Sustainability Education Summit

portrait image of Tiffany Richardson taken in 2015Tiffany Richardson, Ph.D., lecturer in Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, is part of this year’s Sustainability Education Summit, organized by the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota. On September 15, all five University of Minnesota campus digitally co-hosted this event. Dr. Richardson, who is an IonE educator, talked about her involvement in teaching innovation in sustainability.

Stoffregen gives invited talk at National Academy of Kinesiology meeting

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), gave an invited talk at the 87th annual meeting of the National Academy of Kinesiology in Washington, DC, on September 16. His presentation was titled “Ecological physics and the perceptual information for motor control.

 

Kihl presents research at the European Association for Sport Management Conference

Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, attended and presented at the European Association for Sport Management held September 5-8 in Bern, Switzerland.

The title of Dr. Kihl’s presentation was “Examining the Dimensions of Athlete Representation in Sport Governance”. Vicki D. Schull, Ph.D., a 2014 graduate of the School of Kinesiology and current assistant professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and Caroline Heffernan, Ph.D. candidate were co-authors on the presentation.

LaVoi publishes essay on women coaches in Contexts

In honor of Title IX’s 45th year, Contexts magazine publishes a piece “title ix at xlv” with several viewpoints on this topic. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, contributed the essay “Woman Want to Coach“.

Other essays in this article are “Title IX at 45” by Cheryl Cooky, “Where All Kids Can Compete” by Erin Buzuvis, and “Union Busting and the Title IX Straw Man” by Ellen J. Staurowsky.

Contexts magazine’s goal is to make cutting-edge social research accessible to general readers.

 

 

 

 

 

Kane to present at Illinois State University on Title IX

Dr. Mary Jo KaneAs part of the Illinois State University Speaker Series, Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, will talk on October 25 about the social and political implications of Title IX.  Her Esther Larson McGinnis Scholar Lecture is titled “The Impact, Challenges and Opportunities Surrounding Title IX 45-Years After Passage”. Read the entire announcement here.

 

Dengel and colleagues publish findings of childhood cancer survivor study

Donald Dengel, Ph.D.
Marlatt Kara, Ph.D.

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, published with colleagues in the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

Dengel’s former graduate student Marlatt Kara, Ph.D., now a postdoctoral researcher at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, LA, is the lead author of the article titled “The Effect of Atorvastatin on Vascular Function and Structure in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Clinical Trial.” This pilot study examines the development of cardiovascular disease in childhood cancer survivors.

Co-author Aaron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Minnesota, also received his doctoral degree in the School of Kinesiology.

Gao selected as Chinese high-end foreign expert and Foreign Outstanding Instructor for Hunan Province in summer 2017

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL), was reappointed as a high-end foreign expert on Physical Activity and Health by the People’s Republic of China for summer 2017. During his appointment tenure, Gao was based at Hunan Normal University (Changsha, China) and stayed in China for one month over the summer.

Gao at Hunan Normal University

During his stay, Gao delivered a series of lectures on physical activity and health, helped the university establish the discipline in physical activity and health, offered a number of workshops to faculty and students, as well as trained the faculty and graduate students in conducting a cutting-edge research project. Gao is an alumnus of Hunan Normal University, where he received his bachelor’s degree in physical education.

In addition, Gao was selected as the Foreign Outstanding Instructor by Hunan Province of China in summer 2017. He was based at Huaihua University, where he delivered a course titled “Advances in Physical Activity and Health,” as well as mentored the faculty and students in conducting two research projects in the university and local rural communities. Gao’s lectures have been well-received by the students and faculty members at Huaihua University.

Gao lecturing at Huaihua University
Gao consulting on research project

 

 

 

 

 

Konczak lab receives NSF I-corps award

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, is the PI on a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) I-Corps program.

This program prepares scientists and engineers to extend their focus beyond the university laboratory and to accelerate basic-research projects that are ready to move toward commercialization. The aim of this grant is to move forward the lab’s robotic rehabilitation technology that is jointly developed with partners in Italy and Singapore. As part of this grant, a team consisting of postdoctoral researcher Naveen Elangovan (entrepreneurial lead), Jürgen Konczak and Pat Tarnowski as a business adviser is formed. Pat is a trained PT with an MBA and is currently the Senior Director of Clinical Health Solutions at BCBS of Minnesota. The team will work closely with NSF staff and advisers to explore and understand the U.S. market.

Pope hired as adjunct instructor in Exercise Physiology at Bethel University

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology and advised by Kinesiology associate professor Zan Gao, Ph.D., was recently hired as an adjunct instructor at Bethel University teaching exercise physiology and assessment. Bethel University is a private Christian liberal arts institution with an enrollment of approximately 6,000 students.

While Pope’s current research interests center around the use of technology to promote physical activity and nutritious eating behaviors, with improved physiological and psychosocial health outcome the ultimate goal, Pope previously spent six years exclusively studying and/or teaching exercise physiology. Further, since 2012, Pope has been an American College of Sports Medicine Certified Exercise Physiologist and coordinated the Human Performance Laboratory at Boise State University while earning his master’s degree.

StarTribune features Stoffregen and his research in article on virtual reality and motion sickness

Since 1990, Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, has studied motion sickness and virtual reality (VR), sometimes called “simulator sickness.” One of his interests is  examining the effects of VR and VR applications, which can cause people to become spatially disoriented and physically ill.

In a June 30 article titled  “What’s the future of virtual reality? Minnesota researchers may hold the answer,” the StarTribune discusses Stoffregen’s research and the way VR technology deals with motion sickness – or not.

“Why would anyone pay $600 for something that makes you toss your cookies?” Stoffregen asks in the article. He argues that companies who sell VR games are not dealing with changing the designs of the games, but are simply changing their liability rules should consumers become ill.

The article discusses Stoffregen’s research extensively, as well as studies being conducted by the Mayo Clinic, which may provide answers to the problems with nausea and sickness related to VR and VR applications across a broad spectrum.

Stoffregen gives invited talk at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

On June 30, Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), gave an invited talk at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA, titled “Getting your sea legs: The horizon, seasickness, and adaptive human movement.” His presentation was cited in an article in the Cape Cod Times on July 2.

WHOI was the terminus of Stoffregen’s latest research cruise from Costa Rica to Woods Hole. He and student lab members spent 16 days at sea conducting a number of experiments.

Lewis’s research cited in Reuters feature on benefits of exercise on postpartum depression

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology with a research focus on behavioral aspects of physical activity, was recently cited in a story published by Reuters.  The Health News feature, titled “Exercise may stave off postpartum depression,” discussed an article recently published by researchers from Spain and Chile. Their findings align with Lewis’s research outcome that regular, low-intensity exercise has a positive effect on postpartum depression.

The study authors didn’t draw conclusions or provide recommendations about the type or length of exercise that would be most beneficial, but suggested that future studies should include more data about the types of physical activity programs that could reduce depression.

Lewis and her colleagues currently are conducting a randomized trial that analyzes home-based exercise and home-based wellness programs among 450 mothers with a history of depression. In another study, they’re analyzing exercise programs among low-income women at risk for postpartum depression.

“Exercise is often the first thing that gets crossed off the list when there’s a new baby,” Lewis said in the article. “It’s important to take care of yourself through exercise to keep that wellbeing high.”

The story also appeared on the English language media outlet, Channel NewsAsia, based in Singapore.

 

 

 

Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory researchers present at ACSM’s 64th Annual Meeting

Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory - logoZan Gao, Ph.D.,  associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the  Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), together with his doctoral students June Lee, Zachary Pope, and Nan Zeng, took part in the American College of Sport Medicine’s (ACSM) 64th Annual Meeting in Denver, CO, held May 30-June 3. At the conference, the lab members presented their research:

Gao, Z., Li, X.X., Zeng, N., Pope, Z., Yang, H.H., Liu, W.F., Xiong, H., Chen, Y.T., Li, J., & He, W. (2017, June). Accuracy of smartwatches in assessing college students’ energy expenditure in exercise with different intensities.

Lee, J., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang. Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Associations among objectively-determined physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and cognitive function in preschool children.

Pope, Z., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Effects of mhealth apps on physical activity and weight loss outcomes: A meta-analysis.

Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Liao, N., Han, C.Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Predicting biomarkers through affordable fitness band in Chinese breast cancer survivors.

Zeng, N., Li, X.X., Yang, H.M., Liu, W.F., Xiong, H., Chen, Y.T., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). The effects of different types of exercise on Chinese college students’ energy expenditure.

Zeng, N., Han, C.Y., Liao, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Examining the relationships among Chinese breast cancer survivors’ psychosocial outcomes and physical fitness.

 

Aizawa has article accepted for publication in Sport Management Review

School of Kinesiology visiting scholar Kurumi Aizawa, Ph.D., has had an article accepted for publication in Sport Management Review. The article, “Long-Term Impact of the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games on Sport Participation: A Cohort Analysis,” reports the findings that individuals who experienced the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games during youth participated in sport more frequently than other generations.

Co-authors on the publication are Ji Wu, graduate student in Sport Management; Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management; and Mikihiro Sato, Ph.D., assistant professor at James Madison University, VA.

Orr receives travel grant to present at North American Society for Sport Management

Madeleine Orr

Madeleine Orr, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, advised by Dr. Yuhei Inoue, assistant professor of sport management, has been awarded a Council of Graduate Students travel grant for $600  to attend and present at the North America Society for Sport Management Conference. Orr’s presentation is titled: “Toward a Practitioner-Oriented Framework of Event Legacy: A Case Study of Toronto 2015.”

Several other Kinesiology faculty members and graduate students are participating in the conference, held in Denver, CO from May 30 until June 2.

  • Kurumi Aizawa, Ph.D., visiting scholar from Waseda University Research Institute for Sport Knowledge in Tokyo, Japan, presents “Leveraging Events for Sport Participation: The Case of the Japanese National Sports Festival.”
  • Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., presents “Sport Spectatorship and Live Satisfaction: A Multi-City Investigation.”
  • Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., presents “Athlete Representation in the Governance of Intercollegiate Sport,” together with Ph.D. student Caroline Heffernan.
  • Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., participates in a symposium titled, “The Paradoxical Decline of Women in Coaching: Time for Radical Structural Change.”

The detailed conference program is available online.

Chinese World Champion in sailboating cruises with U.S. Olympic sailing coach, students on Lake Minnetonka

Mr. Bowers and Ms. Ziyi Wang

Ms. Ziyi Wang, participant in the 2016-17 China Champions Program (CCP) and World Champion in sailboating, spent the afternoon of May 3 enjoying her sport at the Minnetonka Yacht Club. As a bonus, she had the chance to meet and sail with U.S. National and Olympic sailing coach Gordy Bowers, who is currently head coach of the Lake Minnetonka Sailing School, and Peter Wattson, president of the Minnetonka Yacht Club.

Ms. Wang was accompanied by Ms. Chunlu Wang, Olympic gold medalist in short track speed skating, and Ms. Jill Griffiths, a member of the CCP advisory board. The group also spent time sailing and interacting with high school students from the sailing school.

The China Champions Program is sponsored by the University’s School of Kinesiology, the College of Education and Human Development and the China Center.

Gao and students publish book on technology, physical activity, and health promotion

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, recently published a book titled “Technology in Physical Activity and Health Promotion” together with his graduate students Jung Eun Lee, Zachary PopeHaichun Sun, and Nan Zeng with Routledge publishers.

Offering a logical and clear critique of technology in physical activity and health promotion, this book will serve as an essential reference for upper-level undergraduates, postgraduate students and scholars working in public health, physical activity and health and kinesiology, and healthcare professionals.

The book is now available on the Routledge website and Amazon.com.

Kihl and colleagues’ article accepted for publication in Social Responsibility Journal

KihllL-prefLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D, associate professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology and co-authors Dr. Mansour Ndiaye (University of Connecticut) and Dr. Janet Fink (University of Massachusetts-Amherst) have had their article, “Corruption’s impact on organizational outcomes,” accepted for publication in Social Responsibility Journal.

The article reports on a model of corruption that was developed measuring the impact of sports corruption on organizational outcomes (i.e., win difference and attendance) and the mediating role of institutional reputation.

Konczak gives invited presentation at Neural Control of Movement meeting in Dublin

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, spoke to an audience of about 150 international neuroscientists at the 27th annual meeting of the Society for Neural Control of Movement in Dublin, Ireland.

Konczak provided an overview of his lab’s research on somatosensory deficits in Parkinson’s disease and dystonia and outlined how these sensory impairments may cause the motor deficits seen in the neurological diseases. He also presented recent work led by Dr. Naveen Elangovan, postdoctoral researcher in the lab, that showed that Parkinsonian symptoms can be improved through a specialized sensory training.

Weiss to give keynote presentation at Sport Psychology Conference in Switzerland

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, will give the keynote lecture at the Annual Congress of the German Society of Sport Psychology in Bern, Switzerland, on May 25.

The title of her talk is, “Positive youth development through sport and physical activity: Progress, puzzles, and promise.” The Society represents the interests of the sport psychology community inside and outside universities in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria, and its purpose is to promote and develop research, teaching, and applied fields of performance, expertise, and health. In addition to her keynote lecture, Weiss will give a presentation as part of a symposium on Youth Sport titled, “Evaluating impact of physical activity-based positive youth development programs: A tale of two exemplars.”