CEHD News Silke Moeller

CEHD News Silke Moeller

Barr-Anderson receives prestigious McKnight Presidential Fellow Award

The School of Kinesiology is proud to announce that Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., faculty member and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL), has been selected as a University of Minnesota McKnight Presidential Fellow.  This three-year fellowship, presented by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Board of Trustees, is awarded to mid-career faculty and recognizes significant scholarly accomplishments. The award provides resources for research or scholarly activities.

Dr. Barr-Anderson’s research interests focus on physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and obesity prevention in children and adolescents, with emphasis on home- and community-based environmental interventions that incorporate both physical activity and nutrition to achieve healthy outcomes and to decrease racial/ethnic health inequalities. She has been the Principal Investigator on grants from the General Mills Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and NIH Building Interdisciplinary Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) program, and Co-Investigator on several NIH R01 grants.

Barr-Anderson is one of five newly tenured faculty members at the University to receive this  prestigious award. Congratulations, Dr. Barr-Anderson!

Baeth places second in CEHD 3MT® competition

Anna Baeth, School of Kinesiology Ph.D. student with a focus on sport sociology, finished second in this year’s 3-Minute Thesis competition, which is part of the CEHD research day. Her presentation titled “An Analysis of Women Coaches with Career Longevity in NCAA Division I Sport” described her research around the questions of “who are the women who stay in these positions?” and “what are the factors for this?” Watch the video below for the entire presentation.

Baeth is co-advised by Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., and Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D. She currently is a research assistant in the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women n Sport.

The 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland, Australia, in 2008 and is held in over 200 universities worldwide. It is open to Ph.D. students and challenges participants to present their research in just 180 seconds in an engaging form that can be understood by an audience with no background in the research area.

Ji lab publishes two research articles on oat avenanthramides



Members of the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene and Exercise Science (LPHES) under the directorship of Li Li Ji, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, recently published the following research articles:

Tianou Zhang, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise physiology, is the lead author of the research study titled, “Absorption and Elimination of Oat Avenanthramides (AVAs) in Humans after Acute Consumption of Oat Cookies,” published in Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity (IF=4.593). Coauthors include doctoral student Dongwook Yeo, former research associate Chounghun Kang, and Li Li Ji, Ph.D. The publication discovered that AVAs found naturally in oats are absorbed in the plasma after oral administration in humans.

Chounghun Kang, Ph.D., assistant professor at Inha University, South Korea, and former LPHES research associate, published a research paper on AVAs titled, “Anti-inflammatory Effect of Avenanthramides via NF-κB Pathways in C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cells” in Free Radical Biology and Medicine (IF=5.606).  Dongwook Yeo, Tianou Zhang, and Li Li Ji, Ph.D. are coauthors on this publication. The data in the study indicates that AVAs are potent inhibitors of NFκB-mediated inflammatory response due to their downregulation of IKKβ activity in C2C12 cells.

Avenanthramides (AVA) are a group of compounds found exclusively in oats and are bioavailable to humans. To date, studies have shown that AVAs have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Health benefits of oat avenanthramides may help in the development of value-added products and enhance oat consumption in Minnesota, whose oat production ranks in the top three nationally.

Tianou Zhang
Dr. Chounghun Kang
Dongwook Yeo
Dr. Li Li Ji

Zachary Pope, Kinesiology PhD candidate, to present at U’s Doctoral Research Showcase April 3

The University’s eleventh annual Doctoral Research Showcase will include a presentation by Zachary Pope, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate and advisee of Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL).

The Showcase will be held Tuesday, April 3 from 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. in the Great Hall, Coffman Memorial Union.

The goal of the Doctoral Research Showcase is to help doctoral fellows develop their abilities to talk about their research to audiences outside of their disciplines and to gain exposure for their work with key stakeholders.

Pope’s research presentation is “Use of Wearable Technology to Improve Physical Activity and Eating Behaviors among College Students: A 12-week Randomized Pilot Study.” All Kinesiology colleagues are invited to attend and support Mr. Pope.

For more information about the event or to view a list of all of this year’s participants, visit: z.umn.edu/drs2018.

Barr-Anderson delivers seminar presentation to UW-Madison’s Department of Kinesiology

On March 9, Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented “Halting the Obesity Trajectory: Family-based Interventions for African-American Females” to the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

PAEL lab’s Pope, Zeng, Lee, and Gao publish in Translational Behavioral Medicine

Zach Pope
Dr. Zan Gao

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology and a member of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), is first author on a recently published article in Translational Behavioral Medicine titled, “Feasibility of Smartphone Application and Social Media Intervention on Breast Cancer Survivors’ Health Outcomes.” The article’s co-authors include lab member Nan Zeng, Ph.D. candidate, former lab member June Lee, Ph.D.Zan Gao, Ph.D., lab director, as well as Hee Yun Lee, Ph.D. from the University of Alabama.

The study investigates the feasibility of employing a commercially available mobile health application and social media-based health education intervention to improve breast cancer survivors’ physical activity and health. Observations indicate that the 10-week intervention designed to increase physical activity duration and steps per day decreases body weight and body fat percentage. Improvements in breast cancer survivors’ quality of life were also observed.

Stoffregen publishes in newest Kinesiology Review issue

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory,  published in a recent issues of Kinesiology Review. In his article titled “Ecological Physics and the Perceptual Information That Supports Motor Control,” he discusses the nature of perceptual information and implications for kinesiology.

Kinesiology Review is the official publication of the National Academy of Kinesiology (NAK) and the American Kinesiology Association (AKA).

 

Former LIHP graduate student is author of recently published paper


Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a 2016 graduate from the School of Kinesiology and former member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of an article recently published in the journal, Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article, entitled “Intra- and Interday reproducibility of high-flow-mediated constriction response in young adults” examined the reproducibility of a method to measure vascular health. The results of this study indicate high-flow-mediated constriction is reproducible in young adults and should be included to assess vascular health. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the LIHP in the School of Kinesiology, Ostrem’s adviser, is a co-author on this article, as well as current lab members Nick Evanoff and Justin Ryder.

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D.
Dr. Don Dengel
Donald Dengel, Ph.D.

HSC lab publishes first study in 2018 on abnormal muscle activity in horses with shivers disease

In an interdisciplinary collaboration with partners in veterinary medicine at the University of Minnesota and the Michigan State University, researchers in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory examined horses with shivers disease.

An earlier study identified the previously unknown neuropathology of the disease – a degeneration of neurons in the cerebellum. Because the cerebellum is involved in coordinating the control of muscles during movement, the researchers wanted to find out how the loss of cerebellar function affects the muscle recruitment in these horses. Like humans, horses activate more muscle fibers if they want to run faster. However, these horses recruited more muscles and more muscle fibers than necessary, which led to a loss of movement coordination and problems in their balance.

The results of this study, “Abnormal locomotor muscle recruitment activity is present in horses with shivering and Purkinje cell distal axonopathy,” are published in a paper that appears in Equine Veterinary Journal. Joshua Aman, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral researcher in the lab, is the first author of the paper. Other co-authors are current lab member Naveen Elangovan, Ph.D., and Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.professor in the School of Kinesiology.

 

 

KARE-11 features Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report in story on National Girls and Women in Sports Day

KARE 11 TV gave a nod to the Tucker Center’s  2017- 18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences in their story related to the National Girls and Women in Sports Day celebration on February 7. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, was interviewed for the story and said the report “hopefully stimulates dialogue, raises awareness, helps to recruit and retain more women in the coaching profession, and holds decision-makers who hire coaches more accountable.”

Dengel shares insight on impact of Olympic Games

With the XXIII Olympic Winter Games opening in Pyeongchang County, South Korea on February 8, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is quoted on the U of M homepage on the long-term impact the Olympic Games can have on host countries. Read the feature here.

During winter break, Dengel led a course in London, England, about the impact of the 1908, 1948 and 2012 Olympics on the city, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and on sport. He also taught Sport and Politics Collide: 1936 & 1972 German Olympics.

Weiss receives Legacy Award by Girls on the Run International

From the left: Liz Kunz (CEO of GOTRI), Maureen R. Weiss, Allie Riley (Senior VP of Evaluation and Programming)

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was recognized with the Legacy Award, the highest honor given by Girls on the Run International at its annual Summit in Austin, TX, in January. Girls on the Run is a 501(c)(3) organization and physical activity-based positive youth development (PA-PYD) program designed to enhance girls’ social, psychological, and physical skills and behaviors to successfully navigate life experiences. The program uses running and other physical activities as a platform for teaching life skills and promoting holistic health outcomes for girls in grades 3-8. The organization’s reach is national—in all 50 states with over 200 local community councils, 50,000 volunteer coaches, and over 1.5 million girls served since inception. The organization is committed to diversity—serving girls from all walks of life and backgrounds. Nearly 50% of girls receive subsidized registration fees to enable them to attain the psychosocial and behavioral benefits of participating in each season’s 10-week program.

Weiss’ Legacy Award was based on eight years and hundreds of hours devoted to serving this non-profit organization—as a board member, consultant, speaker, and contributor to curricular development and effective coach delivery—as well as conducting an independent longitudinal evaluation study that demonstrated strong and lasting positive impact of program participation on girls’ life skills learning and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes—confidence, competence, connection, caring, character, and contribution to community and society. The study received widespread attention in a press release last August and Weiss presented the study results at the Summit meeting in a presentation titled, “How and Why Girls on the Run is an Exemplary Positive Youth Development Program.”

 

Joey Kronzer to serve as volunteer assistant tennis coach for Hamline University

Joey Kronzer, a current Kinesiology master’s student with an emphasis in sport and exercise psychology, and a member of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, has been named the Volunteer Assistant Coach of the Hamline University Men’s and Women’s Tennis Teams. The complete announcement is available here.

Kronzer is advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, professor in the School of Kinesiology.

Lewis is co-author of article on fall prevention and physical activity resources for older adults

LewisBeth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology,  is a co-author with U of M colleagues from the School of Nursing, the School of Public Health, and the Department of Psychology, an article in The Gerontologist. “Older Adults’ Utilization of Community Resources Targeting Fall Prevention and Physical Activity”  discusses the effects of older adults knowing about and using local community resources to improve their level of physical activity, which is related to fall prevention in older adults. The study shows that the effects are only short-term and suggests research to identify future strategies.

Leon co-author on Alzheimer’s study

Art Leon, M.D., professor of exercise physiology in the School of Kinesiology, is a co-author of a study recently published in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias. The article is titled “Determination of Aerobic Capacity via Cycle Ergometer Exercise Testing in Alzheimer’s Disease.” The study investigated older adults with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) to determine individualized aerobic capacity and ability to perform treadmill testing due to balance or gait issues.

First author of the publication is Leon’s former doctoral student Ulf G. Bronas, Ph.D., ATC, associate professor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

 

NFL Players Association presents to Sport Management students

nfl
Left to right: Ji Wu, Christopher Nettleton, Leo Lewis, Carl Francis, Jo Ann Buysse, Don Davis, George Atallah

As Minneapolis hosts Super Bowl LII, on Tuesday, January 30, over 100 School of Kinesiology sport management students had the opportunity to listen to some of the top executives in the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA). Students from Dr. Jo Ann Buysse’s Sport in a Diverse Society class, Christopher Nettleton’s Sport Marketing class, and Ji Wu’s Sport Business class attended this event. Not only did they learn about the NFLPA, they also had the chance to ask questions about important social, medical, and business issues affecting the players in the NFL.

The National Football League Players Association (NFLPA) is the union for professional football players in the National Football League. Established in 1956, the NFLPA has a long history of assuring proper recognition and representation of players’ interests. The NFLPA has shown that it will do whatever is necessary to assure that the rights of players are protected—including ceasing to be a union, if necessary, as it did in 1989. In 1993, the NFLPA was again officially recognized as the union representing the players, and negotiated a landmark Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) with the NFL. The current CBA will govern the sport through 2020.

The NFLPA was represented by Carl Francis, Director of Communications, Don Davis, Sr., Director of Player Affairs, and Senior Advisor to the NFLPA Executive Director, and George Atallah, Assistant Executive Director of External Affairs.

Left to right: Ji Wu, Christopher Nettleton, Leo Lewis, Carl Francis, Jo Ann Buysse, Don Davis, George Atallah

Inoue secures funding for Japan College Sport Research program

image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, received 20k funding from the Sport Industry Research Center at Temple University.

For the last two years, Inoue is part of the Japan College Sport Research program, where he and the project leads, Dr. Jermey Jordan and Dr. Daniel Funk at Temple University are assisting the University of Tsukuba, Japan with its effort to create a new athletic department and disseminate its newly adopted model of athletics administration to other universities across Japan. The project funds Inoue received as co-investigator will be used to deliver workshops for Japanese university administrators and to develop the organizational structure for the new athletic department at Tsukuba.

For more information about this project and Inoue’s involvement, see The Japan Times article “Japanese collegiate sports study ends Phase 1.”

LaVoi discusses Character Development in Sport on MomEnough podcast

Nicole M. LaVoi

For the recent issue of the MomEnough parenting podcast, Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, discusses character development in sport, reflects on expectations, and parental issues. She also provides practical tips for supportive parenting.

Visit the podcast’s website and listen to the audio titled “Youth sports, child health and character development: Candid reflections and practical tips from Dr. Nicole Lavoi of CEHD (U of M).”

 

Kinesiology’s Betker and Orr involved in 3MT® events


In preparation for this year’s 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition, CEHD is hosting a Mentoring Workshop on February 1. Last year’s University-wide 3MT winner Madeleine Orr, a sport management doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology will serve as a panelist at this event.

In addition, Orr and Kinesiology’s Morgan Betker, doctoral student with a focus on exercise physiology and previous winners of the CEHD 3MT competition are asked to be judges for the preliminary round of the competition, which will be held on Monday, February 26 and Thursday, March 1 of this year.

Madeleine Orr
Madeleine Orr
Morgan Betker
Morgan Betker