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Kinesiology

Kinesiology’s Dengel featured in CEHD Connect article on Dexalytics

Dr. Don Dengel

Together with CEHD’s Education Technology Innovation (EDI) team, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and his former advisee and partner Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., Research Scientist in Educational Technology Innovations in the College of Education and Human Development at the U of M, are featured in the current CEHD Connect magazine article, “What the body is.”

Dengel and Bosch have developed the Dexalytics tool to utilize massive amounts of DXA (dual-x-ray absorptiometry) body scan data to produce a single, “manageable score for each athlete, the Dexalytics Score, and connect body composition to performance.” With this information they are further able to help coaches and athletes develop individualized training plans.

Stoffregen presents twice at Interdisciplinary Symposium

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, is one of two featured speakers at the 9th Annual Interdisciplinary Symposium of the Postural Restoration Institute in Lincoln, NE, April 20 and 21, 2017.

The titles of Dr. Stoffregen’s keynotes are “Motion Sickness and Human Movement” and “Getting Your Sea Legs.”

Kihl appointed to USA Dance Ethics Committee

KihllL-prefAssociate professor Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, was appointed to the national sport federation USA Dance Ethics Committee. The Ethics Committee was recently created and oversees implementation of and compliance with the organization’s Code of Ethics. Dr. Kihl is one of four committee appointments who will serve a two-year term.

LIHP recent graduate and lab members publish in Journal of Clinical Ultrasound

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a recent graduate from the School of Kinesiology (2016) is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound. The is article entitled “High-flow-mediated constriction in adults is not influenced by biomarkers of cardiovascular and metabolic risk.” The results of this study demonstrated that increased body mass, fat mass, and body mass index were associated with a greater high-flow mediated constriction.

Dr. Ostrem’s former adviser, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, co-authored this article together with Nik Brinck, a recent undergraduate (2015), Katie Bisch, a master student, and Nick Evanoff, a doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology.

HSC lab publishes on exercise and brain dysfunction

Y-Ting Tseng, Sanaz Khosravani, and Arash Mahnan, all graduate students in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL), together with their adviser Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor and lab director, published in the journal Kinesiology Review. Their review titled “Exercise as Medicine for the Treatment of Brain Dysfunction: Evidence for Cortical Stroke, Cerebellar Ataxia, and Parkinson’s Disease” addresses the role of exercise as an intervention for treating neurological disease. It focuses on three major neurological diseases that either present in acute or neurodegenerative forms—Parkinson’s disease, cerebellar ataxia, and cortical stroke.

The paper is part of a series of invited papers from the National Academy of Kinesiology that appear in Kinesiology Review. Maureen Weiss, Ph.D. serves as the current editor of the journal.

Kinesiology Student Council awarded grant monies to host Kinesiology Research Day

The Kinesiology Student Council has been awarded over $900 combined in grant monies to host the 2nd Annual Kinesiology Research Day on April 21, 2017, in 400 Suite Walter Library. These monies came from two sources: A Minnesota Student Association’s Event Grant and a CEHD GradSEHD Cohort Development Grant.
Kinesiology Research Day promises to be an opportunity for faculty members, staff, graduate students and undergraduate students from the School of Kinesiology and relevant departments to interact in an interdisciplinary forum, exchange ideas and present their achievements. Notably, this is the second consecutive year the Council has acquired funding for this annual event, with the Council intending to once again make Kinesiology Research Day a first-class affair.

Moore and Inoue presenting research results to Minnetonka Senior Services

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Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D.
Chris Moore, Ph.D. candidate

Graduate assistant Chris Moore, advised by Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology presented research results to study participants at the Minnetonka Senior Services.

This research study titled “The Influence of Sport Team Identification on Mental Health for Older Adults” was funded by Janet B. Parks NASSM Research Grant. For this study, Moore and Inoue worked with Minnetonka Senior Services to recruit older adults and coordinated trips to three home games of University of Minnesota Women’s volleyball team. The purpose of the project was to examine if attending sporting events and establishing a sense of connections with the sport team and its fans may help enhance older adults’ social relationships and well-being.

Kihl and collegeaues serve as guest editors for special issue on corruption in sport

KihllL-prefLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues James Skinner, MBA, Ph.D. (Loughborough University-London) and Terry Engelberg-Moston, Ph.D. (James Cook University-Australia) served as guest editors for the Special Issue – Corruption in sport: Understanding the complexity of corruption in European Sport Management Quarterly.

In addition, to serving as guest editors, Kihl and colleagues wrote an introductory piece emphasizing how the special issue increases our understanding of the complexity and multidimensional nature of sport corruption through examining integrity and different causes of match fixing.

The entire piece can be read online: “Corruption in sport: Understanding the complexity of corruption“.

Inoue and partners featured in The Japan Times

image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology together with his partners from Temple University and the University of Tsukuba in Japan are featured in The Japan Times, Japan’s largest English-language newspaper.

The article discusses the project to reform Japanese college sports by establishing an athletic department that is modeled after US intercollegiate athletic departments. In the next two years, Dr. Inoue and his partners will study the first implementation of this structure at the University of Tsukuba.

Read the entire article titled “Researchers urge Japan to reform college sports system”.

Kane discusses gender gap in sports on CEHD 2020 Vision blog

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, has a featured post in the CEHD Vision 2020 blog. Based on the research conducted in the Tucker Center, Kane’s post, “Progress and Inequality: Women’s Sports and the Gender Gap”  discusses current aspects of this topic.

Frayeh and Lewis publish in International Journal of Exercise Science

Former School of Kinesiology doctoral student Amanda Frayeh Ph.D., now assistant professor for sport studies at Lock Haven University, published a research article titled Sport Commitment Among Adult Recreational Soccer Players: Test of an Expanded Model” in the International Journal of Exercise ScienceCo-author of the article is Amanda’s former adviser Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology.

The study expanded versions of an existing research model to explore psychosocial factors related to adults’ participation in recreational team sport. The purpose is to demonstrate that sport commitment is related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Global Seminar students blog from Kenya

Over winter break, Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, is teaching a Global Seminar course in Nairobi, Kenya, as part of the U of M’s Learning Abroad programs. The course, titled “Empowering Girls Through Sport,” explores how in the Kenyan culture physical activity is used as a gateway to many aspects of life and how it can empower youth, especially girls.

Students, who are traveling in Kenya from December 26, 2016, to January 16, 2017, are blogging about their experiences: www.umninkenya2017.edublogs.org

 

American Culture Center for Sport receives U.S. State Department grant

For the 5th consecutive year, the U.S. State Department will support the American Culture Center (ACC) for Sport in China administrated by the University of Minnesota. From September 2016 until August 2017, the funding will be $75,000 to Li Li Ji, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology, the PI of the grant.

The ACC focuses on the introduction and promotion of sport as an American heritage and value. The main activities include on-campus, year-round programs and featured lecture tours that visit various Chinese universities.

In January 2017, Ji, Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab, and Gregory Welk, Ph.D., associate professor of health promotion and exercise at Iowa State University, will visit four universities. The goal is to introduce how mobile devices are being used to promote physical activity on U.S. campuses.

 

Ji receives Grant-in-Aid for research

Dr. LiLi JiLi Li Ji, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene and Exercise Science has received a Grant-in-Aid. The title of the study is “In vivo DNA Transfection and Sarcopenia: A Mouse Model.” This research will be supported from January 2017 until June 2018.

Administered through the Office of the Vice President for Research, the Grant-in-Aid program funds are awarded in the belief that the quality of faculty research or artistic endeavors are a major determinant of the overall vitality of the University of Minnesota.

PAEL featured in CE+HD Connect Magazine

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Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL), is featured in the current issue of the College of Education and Human Develpment’s CE+HD Connect Magazine.

Gao and his research team use technology to increase health in children and adults by encouraging movement. Read the entire story titled “Motivation to Move!

 

 

 

 

 

Online magazine ScienceNews quotes Stoffregen on virtual reality and motion sickness

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), is quoted in the online magazine ScienceNews.org. The article, “Virtual reality raises real risk of motion sickness,” is based on Stoffregen’s recently published study in Experimental Brain Research.

In the research study, Stoffregen and his students Justin Munafo and Meg Diedrick found that the gaming headset Oculus Rift causes nausea moreso in women than in men.

Kinesiology’s Anna Solfest awarded UROP to perform research in LIPH lab

solfestanna-2016Anna Solfest, a undergraduate student in the School of Kinesiology, has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Anna’s UROP project will examine body composition, bone density, and visceral adipose tissue in male and female NCAA Division I basketball players. The project is under the direction of Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIPH).

The UROP Award offers financial awards to full-time undergraduates for quality research, scholarly, or creative projects that are judged to contribute to the student’s academic development and which are undertaken in collaboration with a faculty sponsor.

Stoffregen and students publish in Experimental Brain Research

The research study “The virtual reality head-mounted display Oculus Rift induces motion sickness and is sexist in its effects,” by Justin Munafo, Meg Diedrick, and Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., has been published in the journal Experimental Brain Research.

Thomas Stoffregen is the director of the School of Kinesiology’s  Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) where Justin Munafo, a Kinesiology PhD student and DOVE scholar, and Meg Diedrick, an undergraduate research assistant supported by a Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award, are advised by Dr. Stoffregen.

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Dean’s reception held for third cohort of China Champions Program

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Regent Michael Hui (second from left, back row) attended the event as did Sr. Associate Dean, Ken Bartlett.

On Monday, October 24, the College of Education and Human Development hosted the Dean’s reception for the elite Chinese athletes and coach. Regent Michael Hui and Sr. Associate Dean Ken Bartlett welcomed the third cohort of the China Champions program.

Led by the School of Kinesiology, in collaboration with Beijing Sport University and supported by the Chinese government’s Scholarship Council, the China Champions program is a unique, global collaboration that provides mutual benefits for Chinese athletes and University faculty, staff and students.

 

HSC lab and partners publish in PLOS ONE

Labs-HSC-300x55 (1)Anna Cuppone, a doctoral researcher at the Italian Institute of Technology is the first author on a publication. The research for this publication was conducted during her visiting year in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL). The article “Robot-Assisted Proprioceptive Training with Added Vibro-Tactile Feedback Enhances Somatosensory and Motor Performance” is published in PLOS ONE.

This study examined the trainability of the proprioceptive sense and explored the relationship between proprioception and motor learning, using the wristbot developed by HSCL director Juergen Konczak, Ph.D. and collegues from Italy and Singapore.