Category Archives: Departments

C&I students present at curriculum theory and classroom practice conference

 

Five graduate students from the College of Education and Human Development, four of whom are Ph.D. candidates in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction , presented papers at JCT Online‘s 38th  Annual Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice in Dayton, Ohio last weekend. Hillary Barron, Meghan Phadke, Rachel Schmitt, Ramya Sivaraj, and Weijian Wang were joined by Professor Nina Asher of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

The students sat on the panel “Seeking Sites of Resistance: Engaging Identity, Culture, and Belonging in the Classroom.” They discussed the possibilities for equitable educational practices through an interrogation of their own identities and lived experiences based on research conducted with Professor Asher in a graduate seminar focusing on postcolonialism, globalization, and education.

The students presentation abstracts and panel received high praise from attendees and they were invited to return to present at future conferences.

Learn more about the doctoral programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Ji spends productive sabbatical month at University of Valencia, Spain

Dr. Ji and Dr. Viña

Li Li Ji, Ph.D., professor and director of the LPHES in the School of Kinesiology, has finished a one-month visit to the University of Valencia, Spain, as part of his planned sabbatical activity. During his stay, he met with the University’s Faculty of Medicine led by Dr. Josè Viña, and with Dr. Carmen Gomez, a visiting scholar in LPHES last summer, to discuss continuing collaborations on research in the field of muscle biology and aging.

Ji gave two presentations to UV faculty, titled “Mechanism and prevention of muscle disuse atrophy via DNA transfection” and “Oat phytochemicals: Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.” The University of Valencia Medical College is a highly respected institution in Europe, and its former dean, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1906. Ji’s visiting professorship was sponsored by a grant from the European Union.

LaVoi presents at 2017 Japanese Women Coaches Academy meeting

LaVoi, center, with colleagues

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center in the School of Kinesiology, gave a presentation at the third annual Japanese Women Coaches Academy meeting held in Karuizawa, Japan, during the first week in September. LaVoi attended the meeting along with representatives from the U.K., Australia, and the top women in sport in Japan. She spoke on barriers and supports for female coaches based on her book, Women in Sports Coaching.

Read more about the conference here.

 

 

Lewis quoted in article on yoga and preventing weight gain in the Minnesota Daily

An article in the October 18 online issue of the Minnesota Daily features a study showing a relationship between the effect of practicing yoga and preventing weight gain. Researchers studied young adults who were overweight five years before the study, and found that those who engaged in yoga had a slight weight loss over time, while those who were not practicing yoga gained weight.  Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director in the School of Kinesiology, was quoted, saying: “[Yoga] has the potential to reach individuals who … want something that combines a physical activity that really deals with not only your mental health but your physical well-being.”

The study is part of a larger research initiative,  Project EAT, which examines nutrition, physical activity and weight status among people in Minnesota ranging from adolescence to adulthood.

 

 

 

 

Kane in Title IX feature in Illinois State VidetteOnline magazine

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, is featured in the Illinois State University VidetteOnline magazine in an article entitled, “Professor returns to Blo-No to discuss Title IX.” Kane, an internationally recognized scholar on Title IX, talks about her own personal experience with sport and her upcoming keynote for Illinois State’s School of Kinesiology and Recreation’s 2017 Esther Larson McGinnis Scholar Lecture on October 25.

C&I’s Linda Buturian receives Institute on the Environment fellowship

Senior Teaching Specialist Linda Buturian of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction has been awarded a fellowship to become an IonE educator with the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment (IonE).

IonE’s Faculty Leadership Council selects between three and five educators for a fellowship each year. As an IonE educator, Buturian will work with other educators on a year-long project surrounding sustainability efforts. The project team will “develop curricula related to education, storytelling, art, and creativity which focuses on the Mississippi River, and local and global sustainability issues,” says Buturian.

Her team will also “forge connections with CEHD faculty, staff, and students who are addressing, researching, or interested in environmental issues in order to move toward a dialogue about sustainability issues and mission as they relate to respective departments represented in the college,” adds Buturian. During her 14-month fellowship, Buturian will have the opportunity to present on her research at the statewide Sustainability Education Summit.

For more information or to become involved with the sustainability project, contact Linda Buturian.

Consider donating to this project or continued projects in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Inoue quoted in The Japan Times on college sports

 image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an article in The Japan Times, Japan’s largest English-language newspaper.

Inoue helped to organize former U of M athletic director Joel Maturi’s visit to Japan, where Maturi talked about the pros and cons of collegiate athletics in the United States. In the article titled, “Former Minnesota athletics chief Joel Maturi says Japan can benefit from college sports overhaul,” Inoue mentions the positive role collegiate sport can have for student communities.

Angel Pazurek presents on eLearning in Mauritius, Africa

Angelica Pazurek, a lecturer in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction presented a workshop on “Global Perspectives on Design Thinking for Technology Supported Learning” at the annual eLearning Africa conference in Mauritius, Africa. The conference is the largest gathering of eLearning and ICT-supported education and training professionals in Africa, enabling participants to enhance their knowledge and expertise while also developing multinational and cross-industry contacts and partnerships.

Pazurek also led a panel discussion on effective practices and the importance of context in online teaching and learning.

Learn more about the Learning Technologies programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

Kinesiology graduate students  Kronzer, Wood, and White to present at AASP Conference

Current School of Kinesiology and Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory graduate students Joey Kronzer (M.S.), Kristin Wood (Ph.D.), and Andrew White (Ph.D.) will be presenting their research at the upcoming Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) annual conference in Orlando, Fl, on October 18th–21st.

  • Kronzer will be giving a 15-minute talk titled “Using E-Prime 2.0 to Develop Sport-Specific Video Analysis Training Protocols.
  • Wood will be presenting a paper titled “Analyzing the Effectiveness of an Injury Education Program in Increasing Novice Marathoners’ Self-Efficacy in Adopting Proper Injury Management Strategies.
  • White will be presenting a paper titled “Breadth or depth? Evaluating psychological, performance, and injury outcomes following multidimensional or focused mental skills training in marathoners.

All three students are advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab.

Joey Kronzer
Andrew White
Kristin Wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dengel co-investigator on newly funded grant

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is a co-investigator on a grant funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

The 3-year grant titled “Hypoglycemia After Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes: Intranasal Naloxone As A Novel Therapy To Preserve Hypoglycemia Counterregulation” will examine the effects of intranasal naloxone to preserve normal blood glucose levels during aerobic exercise in type 1 diabetics.

Gao publishes book chapter in Traditional Chinese physical activities

Konczak gives invited presentation at European workshop

On October 10, Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, presented a lecture on robotic rehabilitation to the PACE network community in Genova, Italy.

PACE stands for Perception and Action in Complex Environments. The network is funded by the European Union and seeks to train predoctoral students with a background in engineering, mathematics, neuroscience, and psychology.

 

Koopmeiners to present at AAN’s Branding You professional development session

Katie Koopmeiners, undergraduate academic adviser for the School of Kinesiology, will be presenting at the Academic Advising Network’s first session in their professional development series, “Branding You.” The title of her presentation is “Creating an Advising Philosophy.”

Koopmeiners, who advises in the areas of Recreation Administration, Sport Management, and Coaching, will discuss the importance of an advising philosophy in a working session that will help new and seasoned advisers formalize their guiding principles in their advising practice. Participants will consider their advising style, strengths and theoretical basis to develop their own personal advising philosophy.

The session will be held Tuesday, October 24, from 10:30-noon in Nolte 140.

Mahnan featured in Global Programs and Strategy Alliance’s “Global U”

Arash Mahnan, Kinesiology Ph.D. student and IT Fellow, is one of three people featured in the Global Programs and Strategy Alliance online newsletter, Global U, promoting Driven: The University of Minnesota Campaign, the first system-wide fundraising campaign at the U of M in more than a decade. The Alliance has set a goal of raising $7 million to “Drive a Global U.”

Mahnan discusses his goal to fill the gap between engineering and clinical research, and the imperative to attract top students and faculty from around the world to come to the University of Minnesota. He is a student in the area of biomechanics and neural control and is advised by Juergen Konczak, Ph.D.

Read Mahnan’s feature here.

 

 

Annie Mason writes op-ed challenging critics of racial justice education in Star Tribune

Annie Mason, Program Director of Elementary Teacher Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, published an op-ed in the Star Tribune as a counterpoint to Katherine Kersten’s article, “Racial identity policies are ruining Edina’s fabled schools,” on the Edina school district’s new “All for All” plan, which Kersten blames for lowered test results in Edina schools.

Kersten alleges the new plan shifts the  district leaders’ educational philosophy from “academic excellence for all” to ensuring “that students think correctly on social and political issues.” She argues that the new racial justice-geared agenda creates a hostile environment for students with “nonconforming views,” and does nothing to improve test scores or foster high academic performance in the district.

Mason challenged these ideas in her op-ed, ” Counterpoint: Edina schools: why it’s crucial to unlearn racism.” She discusses the way white privilege has shaped our country’s education system since its conception, the learning limitations placed on students of all races, and the importance of maintaining a dialogue about race in our schools. “[Students] know that to change the future, we have to reckon with the past,” Mason writes. “To unlearn racism, we have to be willing to face what it is, what it has created and how we are all implicated in it.”

Learn more about The Department of Curriculum and Instruction’s teacher education programs  and our commitment to equity in education.

 

Aspiring English teacher and first-generation American Quynh Van wants to reshape the discussion on race in the classroom

Quynh-Huong Nguyen Van is a senior majoring in English enrolled in the DirecTrack to Teaching program. She shares her hopes of shaping the conversation about race in America with students, becoming an English teacher, and how being a first-generation American will help her as a teacher.

What do you hope to accomplish as a teacher?

I want to be a teacher because it’s more than teaching a subject you are passionate about, but also about creating a safe space for students to be themselves and to grow intellectually. I also believe racism is a serious issue in America today and want to play my small part in helping to reshape the way we view race by incorporating discussions about racism and society into my classroom. I cannot think of a better setting to facilitate this than English classrooms; especially since many literary works can be used as a vehicle to help students see truth through fiction and to help students build empathy for other people by getting to know characters and authors.

What strengths do you think you will bring to the classroom? 

I believe one of my greatest assets as a future educator is my Vietnamese-American background. I feel my first-generation immigrant experiences have given me unique perspectives that will allow me to be a more empathetic and inclusive teacher

What has been your experience with the DirecTrack faculty?

My experience with my DirecTrack advisors over the last three years has been absolutely phenomenal. They have always been understanding and supportive of not only my academic work, but also my personal endeavors. My DirecTrack advisors have proven to be some of the strongest faculty relationships I have cultivated at the University.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

In five years, I imagine myself in a classroom, more adept at my job than my first year of teaching, and hopefully being an advisor for a school club like speech or directing the school play.

What’s been your favorite course so far?

My favorite course has been ENGL3601: Analysis of the English Language, an intro-level linguistics course focusing on the English language. It is a course that is required for my major as well as a prerequisite for the Master’s in Education and Initial Teaching license in English program. I initially only took the class because it was required, but it quickly became my one of my favorites. The class felt like I was applying chemistry or math to the study of the English language; I found the class to be a breath of fresh air!

Any other thoughts you want to share about your experience?

Through DirecTrack, I have been able to have many meaningful service-learning experiences, make great friends who are as dedicated about teaching as I am, and have found a community I feel I belong in.

Learn more about the DirecTrack to Teaching program and the M.Ed. and Initial Teaching License programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette quotes Kane on collegiate athletic directors

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article, “Female athletic directors at Pitt and Penn State stand out in a field still dominated by men,” commenting on the potential for women candidates for AD positions within a power differential that works against their being hired.

Tucker Center research cited in Salt Lake Tribune piece on Cam Newton remark

Tucker Center research is cited in a Salt Lake Tribune article, “‘Sports don’t have a gender’: Utah women’s tackle football players respond to Cam Newton.” Newton’s remark was: “It’s funny to hear a female talk about [running football] routes.”

 

Kinesiology alum Mackenzie Havey will read from her new book, Mindful Running, at U of M Bookstores October 17

School of Kinesiology alumna Mackenzie Lobby Havey, M.A., will read her recently published book, Mindful Running: How Meditative Running Can Improve Performance and Make You a Happier, More Fulfilled Person, at the U of M Bookstore in Coffman Memorial Union on the Minneapolis campus on Tuesday, October 17, at 4 p.m.

In her book, Havey, who is a runner, coach, and fitness journalist, describes her personal experience with meditative running and the influence it has had on her life.

“I discovered that when I integrated the principles of mindfulness into my daily running practice, it boosted my joy in the process of training, as well as my performance, and I wanted to share that in this book,” she says. “As I began to deconstruct my own mindful running routine and talk to Olympians, paralympians, and researchers in the fields of contemplative neuroscience and sports psychology, I found that I wasn’t the only one who had experienced significant benefit from combining mindfulness with physical training. Mindful Running is all about learning to run the mile you are in and train smarter, not harder–to find new ways to relate to your body, mind, and environment to deal with things like discomfort, fatigue, and negative thinking with intentionality and ease. My hope is that some of the lessons learned on the run will find their way into other parts of your life as well.”

Havey graduated with her master’s degree in 2009 in the Sport and Exercise Psychology emphasis area and was advised by Prof. Diane Wiese-Bjornstal. She is currently teaching a Beginning Running class in the School’s Physical Activity Program.

LaVoi keynotes at Grinnell Women Coaches Workshop

image of Nicole M. LaVoiTucker Center co-director Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., faculty in the School of Kinesiology, will give a keynote, “Beyond the Paradox for Women Coaches: Strategies for Surviving and Thriving,” at the Grinnell College Women Coaches Workshop on Monday, October 9. The full-day workshop features three other keynotes and is designed for women head coaches, women assistant coaches, and professional women in athletics. More information and registration …