CEHD News Departments

CEHD News Departments

Barr-Anderson delivers seminar presentation to UW-Madison’s Department of Kinesiology

On March 9, Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented “Halting the Obesity Trajectory: Family-based Interventions for African-American Females” to the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on article published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Christiana Raymond-Pope, M.S., doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. The article, “Total and segmental body composition examination in collegiate football players using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual x-ray absorptiometry,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual X-ray absorptiometry when assessing total and segmental percent body fat, fat mass, and fat-free mass in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football athletes. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., a professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., a graduate of the School of Kinesiology, are also co-authors on the article.

Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell, Kinesiology B.S., awarded UROP grant to work in APAL

Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell, Kinesiology B.S. student, has been awarded a UROP grant that will support her work as an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) directed by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.DHayley’s funded project is “The Role of Chromaticity in the Visual Control of Stance.” Her adviser for the project is Dr. Stoffregen, and she will be working directly with Kinesiology Ph.D. student Ruth Rath.

Japan Times article features Inoue and colleagues

image of Yuhei InoueAn article,”College sports reformers stay positive despite setbacks,” appearing in The Japan Times features Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology. The article emphasizes Inoue and colleagues’ joint research project with Japan’s University of Tsukuba, Temple University and Dome Corporation to allow sport teams to be formally recognized as belonging to a university, much as in the U.S. NCAA.

WCCO/CBS MN interviews LaVoi on coaches report card

WCCO/CBS Minnesota has interviewed Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. for the article, “The Report Card: Why Aren’t More Women Coaching Women?” LaVoi talks about the women coaches report card grading, and notes the U of M is only one hire away from an “A” grade.

Spokesman-Recorder on LaVoi’s new hiring report

The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder News Online (MSR) has released an article, “New reports show little progress in college sport race, gender hiring,” featuring the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport’s recently released report, “Head coaches of women’s collegiate teams: A report on seven select NCAA Division-I conferences, 2017-18” authored by Tucker Center co-director and senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. MSR reporter Charles Hallman quotes LaVoi on the very slight rise in hiring of women head coaches of women’s teams, saying “It’s better than going in reverse.” The article also features The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) report, “Racial and Gender Report Card,” authored by Dr. Richard Lapchick (College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida).

C&I Emerging Scholars conference highlights student research

The annual C&I Emerging Scholars conference, sponsored by C&I’s graduate student group, CIGSA, continues to grow as it meets a need to showcase student research. This year’s conference on Friday, April 6, will offer 65 research presentations ranging from roundtables to posters to talks that highlight student research in any aspect of curriculum and instruction. Students, faculty, and staff outside of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction are also presenting and encouraged to attend.

The conference theme is “Reimagine Education: A Collective Responsibility.” Keynote speaker, Peter Demerath,  an associate professor in OLPD, will kick off the conference followed by breakout sessions and a poster presentation. The day will wrap up with networking and an ice cream social.

Formerly, the C&I conference was known as C&I research day and organized in a poster presentation format. Reconfiguring the event as a conference has helped graduate students build their professional CV’s and gain presentation experience while building a student support network and research community. However, the conference is not just for graduate students. Undergraduate students are encouraged to attend and submit research. (The submission deadline has passed for this year’s event).

Registration is free and includes a catered lunch and access to all events and presentations. The conference start at 11 a.m. and end at 4:00 p.m., but attendees are not required to be there for the entire program. Keynote is in Peik gym, poster session in Peik 45.

C&I students interested in getting involved with the CIGSA or attending upcoming CIGSA events can visit the CIGSA website or send them an email.

Learn more about student research in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

C&I faculty, educators, and teachers take action in response to school shootings

Photo courtesy of Education Minnesota

Educators and students across Minnesota are mobilizing in response to the recent school shootings. As a community of educators, the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Minnesota is responding with ways students, faculty, and staff can get involved to protect students and teachers, and keep schools safe.

Department chair, Cynthia Lewis affirms support for our students, “We also want to honor the important work of being a teacher and teacher educator and the strength of all students/youth — from Black Lives Matter and all of the long histories of youth of color speaking out against gun violence to the youth of Stoneman Douglas High School working hard to change minds about gun control.”

The department is extending an open invitation to take action, for students, faculty, and staff to join and take action against gun violence with the following action steps with the goal to show their support for students in a quest for change.

  • A structured Flipgrid response to use in your classrooms as you and your students wish to participate.https://flipgrid.com/0b8526
  • #EnoughisEnough Syllabus: Responding to School Violence in the Classroom.  This ongoing google doc is awaiting your contributions and is meant to eventually serve as a resource for individual readings or creating units for your courses.
  • A Teach-In (date in April TBA) with a focus on information (gun control policy and action; responses to school drills, etc.), critical pedagogy approaches, masculinities and violence, and responses from educators and students. Please send a note to CIinfo@umn.edu if you are interested in being a member of the planning group.

In addition, you can join the student chapter of Education Minnesota for upcoming marches against gun violence in schools. Contact edmn@umn.edu to find out how you can take part in the Minnesota March for Our Lives on March 24 at 10:00 a.m. at the Minnesota State Capitol. Stop by on Friday, March 23, for  a “cookies and conversion” meeting for CEHD students to talk about the impact of recent events and to make signs for the march. Visit their Facebook or Twitter pages for more information.

Elementary ed major, Michelle Diaz, is driven to understand the issues affecting urban students

michelle diazMichelle Diaz, elementary education foundations major and racial justice in urban schooling minor (RJUS), talks about what she learned from high school students through her service learning placement.

What drove you to enroll in the RJUS minor program?

I enrolled in the minor after taking CI 3101 “Issues in Urban Education” as a recommendation from my advisor. The course material was extremely interesting and left me wanting more. I was easily able to relate the topics learned to other courses I took for my major in elementary education. Overall, I think it goes hand in hand with my major.

Which part of the program have you found the most valuable?

So far I have found the service-learning experience the most valuable. While taking CI 3101 I was placed in a high school after-school program where I had some of the most meaningful and engaging conversations about current issues in society and education in urban schools. The group of high schoolers and cooperating teacher I worked with were extremely passionate about team building, empowerment, and creating future leaders. They welcomed me into their group and taught me that age does not matter when it comes to creating awareness. It is definitely an experience I will never forget.

What do you hope to do after graduation?

After graduation, I hope to find a job at a school in the city. I also plan on returning to the U to complete my master’s degree.

What do you hope to get out of the minor?

The most important thing I hope to get out of this minor is understanding how to be sensitive with issues that could be affecting my future students’ lives outside of my classroom. It will help me create meaningful relationships with my students and their families to be educated on these issue so I understand where they are coming from and if there is anything I can do to make their experience in my classroom the best possible.

Any other thoughts you want to share about your experience?

My experience so far with not only the courses, but also the service learning component in the minor, have been great. I think it really helps to volunteer at a school while learning about issues in urban schooling because you get firsthand experience. I also think that these courses and the minor are great for everyone that will be either in the education fields or simply a part of the urban community. It truly is a great minor for all who are interested in racial justice.

Learn more about the elementary education foundations major and the racial justice in urban schooling minor.

Dengel presents at East Carolina University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at East Carolina University’s Department of Kinesiology in Greenville, NC, on February 27. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “From Peripheral to Cerebral Blood Vessels: The Impact of Vascular Dysfunction.”

Smith is author of book chapter in Wellbeing in Higher Education

Thomas Smith, Ph.D., adjunct instructor in the School of Kinesiology, is the author of a chapter in a newly published book by Routledge, Wellbeing in Higher Education: Cultivating a Healthy Lifestyle Among Faculty and Students. Smith’s chapter, “Ergonomic and Ecological Perspectives,” discusses how the design of post-secondary systems influences student wellbeing.

Wellbeining in Higher Education

C&I M.Ed. candidate opens Dakota Language immersion school


Photo by J.P. Lawrence

Vanessa Goodthunder, an M.Ed. candidate in Social Studies Education, was recently featured in the Christian Science Monitor for her work to open a Dakota Language Immersion preschool in the Lower Sioux reservation as part of an effort to revitalize the Dakota language and cultural heritage. Currently, only five people in the state speak Dakota.

Goodthunder received a $1.9 million grant in September from Head Start,  followed by a $90,000 grant in December. With an opening set for mid-June, the immersion school will enroll up to 74 children.

“We feel it’s a great vehicle to raise the next generation of Dakota speakers, and simultaneously help heal historical trauma,” Goodthunder says.

Read the full article in the Christian Science Monitor.

Learn more about the M.Ed. and initial teaching license programs and the M.Ed. in language immersion education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Greising publishes in Cell Death Discovery

Sarah Greising, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, has published an article in the online journal, Cell Death Discovery. “Multiscale analysis of a regenerative therapy for treatment of volumetric muscle loss injury”  explores the regenerative process of injured skeletal muscles resulting from major traumatic injury. The study results suggest that the pathological response to volumetric muscle loss (VML) injury during the acute stage of the healing response overwhelms endogenous and therapeutic regenerative processes.

School of Kinesiology alumnus featured in Florida Today

Matthew Duffy, a 2013 alumni of the School of Kinesiology, was profiled in Florida Today. Duffy received his B.S. in kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise science. He is currently a clinical integration specialist at Health First’s Pro Health and Fitness Center in Viera, Florida. Duffy works with a variety of patients, including cardiac, post-rehab and people with disabilities, and conducts physical and postural assessments, creates strength training workouts and program design, and assists in flexibility training and assisted stretching.


PAEL lab’s Pope, Zeng, Lee, and Gao publish in Translational Behavioral Medicine

Zach Pope
Dr. Zan Gao

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology and a member of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), is first author on a recently published article in Translational Behavioral Medicine titled, “Feasibility of Smartphone Application and Social Media Intervention on Breast Cancer Survivors’ Health Outcomes.” The article’s co-authors include lab member Nan Zeng, Ph.D. candidate, former lab member June Lee, Ph.D.Zan Gao, Ph.D., lab director, as well as Hee Yun Lee, Ph.D. from the University of Alabama.

The study investigates the feasibility of employing a commercially available mobile health application and social media-based health education intervention to improve breast cancer survivors’ physical activity and health. Observations indicate that the 10-week intervention designed to increase physical activity duration and steps per day decreases body weight and body fat percentage. Improvements in breast cancer survivors’ quality of life were also observed.

Dengel and colleagues publish in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and colleagues have published in the online publication, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

The article, “Association between carotid intimates media thickness, age, and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents,” describes their study to determine the relations of measures of carotid intima media thickness with body mass index and cardiovascular risk score in children. The study concluded that maintaining normal levels of adiposity and other risk variables may be useful in preventing early changes associated with preclinical atherosclerosis.


Stoffregen publishes in newest Kinesiology Review issue

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory,  published in a recent issues of Kinesiology Review. In his article titled “Ecological Physics and the Perceptual Information That Supports Motor Control,” he discusses the nature of perceptual information and implications for kinesiology.

Kinesiology Review is the official publication of the National Academy of Kinesiology (NAK) and the American Kinesiology Association (AKA).


Ozy.com profile of US Hockey’s Hilary Knight quotes Tucker Center’s Kane

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an Ozy.com profile of US Olympic Hockey star Hilary Knight, “Team USA’s Hockey Star Has A Higher Goal: Equal Pay.” Kane says “the team’s ability to convert frustration into actionable progress has major historical significance.”

Kane podcast on WiSP Sports: “Limited sport coverage for female athletes”

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is featured in a WiSP Sports “Talking Point” podcast discussing how sport can be a site of resistance and empowerment for women. The podcast and transcript, “How Women’s Status in Sport is Contained by Men,” is a discussion of Kane’s “perspectives on why women’s sports coverage is so limited and why the focus on women’s athletes tends towards sexual objectification instead of their physical and athletic capacities.” WiSP Sports Radio is the world’s largest podcast network for women’s sport featuring more than 760 episodes and 30 unique shows with a global reach of 1.6 million.


credit – A WiSP Sports Production

Former LIHP graduate student is author of recently published paper

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a 2016 graduate from the School of Kinesiology and former member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of an article recently published in the journal, Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article, entitled “Intra- and Interday reproducibility of high-flow-mediated constriction response in young adults” examined the reproducibility of a method to measure vascular health. The results of this study indicate high-flow-mediated constriction is reproducible in young adults and should be included to assess vascular health. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the LIHP in the School of Kinesiology, Ostrem’s adviser, is a co-author on this article, as well as current lab members Nick Evanoff and Justin Ryder.

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D.
Dr. Don Dengel
Donald Dengel, Ph.D.