CEHD News Research

CEHD News Research

C&I Ph.D. candidate wins competitive P.E.O. Scholar Award

Jeanna Wieselmann, a Ph.D. candidate in STEM Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, received the highly competitive P.E.O. Scholar Award for the 2018-2019 academic year. Wieselmann was one of 100 winners selected from 741 applicants to receive the $15,000 award based on her scholarship, academic achievement, and career goals. P.E.O. is a philanthropic organization where women celebrate the advancement of women. The P.E.O. Scholar award is specifically for women within two years of completing a doctoral level degree.

Wieselmann is studying gender equity in STEM Education and has been the recipient of a National Science Foundation graduate research fellowship, as well as a WPLC graduate award.

Learn more about the STEM Education Ph.D. program and research in STEM Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

C&I’s Lesa Clarkson receives the President’s 2018 Community-Engaged Scholar Award

 

Lesa Clarkson wins community engaged scholar award
Lesa Clarkson (right) with Curriculum and Instruction Department Chair Cynthia Lewis (left)

Lesa Clarkson, an associate professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, has been named the 2018 President’s Community-Engaged Scholar Award winner. The award recognizes one faculty or P&A individual annually for exemplary engaged scholarship in his/her field of inquiry.  The recipient must demonstrate a longstanding academic career that embodies the University of Minnesota’s definition of public engagement. Clarkson was chosen from all of the winners from each UMN college and campus community-engaged scholars award winners to receive this highest of UMN honors for her work with Prepare2Nspire.

Prepare2Nspire is a tiered tutoring program that prepares underserved middle school and high-school math students to succeed. The program connects math students in urban classrooms with undergraduate mentors at the University. The tutoring sessions take place in North Minneapolis and provides free bus fares and food to the students and mentors. The students served are primarily African-American, historically the group that has the lowest scores on national and state assessments. Through the program, she has seen ACT and standardized test scores rise.

Curriculum and Instruction department chair Cynthia Lewis says that “Lesa has developed and implemented a program that not only provides students with support in mathematics but also creates a culture of excellence and high academic standards…Lesa strives to provide underrepresented populations with the power of math as a tool for social justice.” Clarkson’s commitment to educational equity and social justice is an outstanding exemplar of the department’s mission.

Her innovative work with this program has been honored with an INSIGHT into Diversity Inspiring Women in STEM award in 2016.

As a recipient of the University-wide Community Engaged Scholarship Award, Clarkson will receive $15,000 and have her named placed on the UMN Scholars walk.

Consider supporting the Prepare2Nspire program with a donation to keep the program running for future students in need.

Find out more about mathematics education degrees and programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

C&I Emerging Scholars conference highlights student research

The annual C&I Emerging Scholars conference, sponsored by C&I’s graduate student group, CIGSA, continues to grow as it meets a need to showcase student research. This year’s conference on Friday, April 6, will offer 65 research presentations ranging from roundtables to posters to talks that highlight student research in any aspect of curriculum and instruction. Students, faculty, and staff outside of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction are also presenting and encouraged to attend.

The conference theme is “Reimagine Education: A Collective Responsibility.” Keynote speaker, Peter Demerath,  an associate professor in OLPD, will kick off the conference followed by breakout sessions and a poster presentation. The day will wrap up with networking and an ice cream social.

Formerly, the C&I conference was known as C&I research day and organized in a poster presentation format. Reconfiguring the event as a conference has helped graduate students build their professional CV’s and gain presentation experience while building a student support network and research community. However, the conference is not just for graduate students. Undergraduate students are encouraged to attend and submit research. (The submission deadline has passed for this year’s event).

Registration is free and includes a catered lunch and access to all events and presentations. The conference start at 11 a.m. and end at 4:00 p.m., but attendees are not required to be there for the entire program. Keynote is in Peik gym, poster session in Peik 45.

C&I students interested in getting involved with the CIGSA or attending upcoming CIGSA events can visit the CIGSA website or send them an email.

Learn more about student research in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

C&I’s Linda Buturian receives Institute on the Environment fellowship

Senior Teaching Specialist Linda Buturian of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction has been awarded a fellowship to become an IonE educator with the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment (IonE).

IonE’s Faculty Leadership Council selects between three and five educators for a fellowship each year. As an IonE educator, Buturian will work with other educators on a year-long project surrounding sustainability efforts. The project team will “develop curricula related to education, storytelling, art, and creativity which focuses on the Mississippi River, and local and global sustainability issues,” says Buturian.

Her team will also “forge connections with CEHD faculty, staff, and students who are addressing, researching, or interested in environmental issues in order to move toward a dialogue about sustainability issues and mission as they relate to respective departments represented in the college,” adds Buturian. During her 14-month fellowship, Buturian will have the opportunity to present on her research at the statewide Sustainability Education Summit.

For more information or to become involved with the sustainability project, contact Linda Buturian.

Consider donating to this project or continued projects in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

International student and online learning researcher: Ph.D. candidate Fan Ouyang

Fan Ouyang, a Ph.D. candidate in the Learning Technologies program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, talks about the unique challenges of studying in a foreign country, her research in online and blended learning, and deep commitment to education. 

What drove you to enroll in the Learning Technologies Ph.D. program? 

I have a background in computer sciences and software theories. After graduation, I taught college-level courses for six years in my native China. I thought an intersection of education and computer technology would be a good fit for my professional interests, so I decided to pursue a Ph.D. in Learning Technologies. I’ll complete in February, 2018.

You are originally from China. How has your experience been studying in a foreign country?

It is a worthy experience, full of challenge, anxiety, hope, and joy. I came to the U.S. at a relatively mature age to purse my doctoral degree. I believe that helped because it was an age that I started to really want to know myself at a deep level, without self-judgment. Putting all the emotions aside, I believe it is the persistency of hard work that helps me not only overcome all language and research barriers to complete my degree, but more importantly, it helps me to become more open-minded, reflective, and calm in all life situations. I believe I come to the end of my Ph.D. journey as a better person.

What is your current research focus?

My research interests lie at the intersection of online and blended learning, pedagogy development, and learning analytics. Specifically, my current research focuses on three interrelated strands:

  • the research of computer-supported, network-based collaborative learning
  • the design of online and blended learning and development of relevant pedagogies
  • the application of computational methods and analytical techniques to understanding learning and instruction.

I want to better understand how students learn in online and blended learning contexts to help educators and practitioners better use this knowledge. I also hope to design innovative instructional tools to foster learner engagements.

How is the field of online teaching changing? Do you think it could replace face-to-face teaching?

At the early stage of online education, instructors tended to utilize traditional instructor-centered methods. Now, online teaching is changing to be more democratic, where instructors play a more symmetrical, participatory role with students. Students transform from the passive recipient of information and knowledge in the traditional instruction context to critical constructors of knowledge under their own autonomy.

Overall, the ultimate goal of education always stays the same, no matter the format: to nurture responsibility and initiative in learners, to build diversity and openness in the learning environments, and to help learners become self-directed and reflective. Therefore, I don’t think we need to replace one format with another. Instead, we as educators need to think about how to empower learners to view themselves as individuals who can shape their fields of interest, make action to achieve their personal and professional goals, and help people in their communities to grow and develop.

Which resources have you found through the department to help with your research?

I have benefited from department traveling funding, research workshops, involvement in research day, graduate student associations, and interactions with faculty in the department.

Any other thoughts you want to share about your experience?

During my Ph.D. study here in U.S., I have made efforts to cultivate four characteristics in myself: life-long learning (being eager to learn), capacity (being accessible, positive, and resourceful), entrepreneurship (being critical, innovative, and open-minded), and collaboration (being trustful, supportive, and collegial). I think this mindset has laid a positive foundation for my Ph.D. journey.

Learn more about the Learning Technologies programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

C&I receives several STEM and technology research grants

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction, known nationally and internationally for cutting-edge research in education, received grant awards for several research projects this summer in the fields of STEM education and Learning Technologies.

Associate professor in the Learning Technologies program, Bodong Chen, received $169,041 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to continue his work over the next two years on “Cyberlearning: Connecting Web Annotations and Progressive Online Discourse in Science Classrooms.”

Julie Brown, an assistant professor in C&I’s STEM Education Program, received $1,022,146 from NSF over three years for her work with Keisha Varma on “ESPRIT: fostering Equitable Science through Parental Involvement and Technology.”

C&I’s Gillian Roehrig, a professor in the STEM education program, was awarded $103,172 by NSF for “Teacher Network Retention in Noyce Communities of Practice, State University of New York at Stony Brook.”

Kathleen Cramer’s GopherMath Project earned $50,000 over nine months from Greater Twin Cities United Way. Cramer is a C&I professor who specializes in mathematics education for children in grades 4-8.

Cassandra Scharber, a professor in the Learning Technologies program and co-director of the Learning Technologies Media Lab, received multiple grants for her project SciGirls Code LRNG Playlists. Grant organizations included Twin Cities Public Television, the University of California – Irvine, and the MacArthur Foundation.

STEM education professor, Lesa Covington Clarkson, was awarded $95,767 from the Minnesota Office of Higher Education over 14 months for “e3Algebra: Engineering Engaging in Eighth Grade Algebra in Urban Classrooms.”

Learn more about the Department of Curriculum and Instruction’s research projects, centers, and areas of faculty expertise.

Ph.D. student in STEM Education travels to Japan to research STEM equity

STEM equity researcher, National Science Foundation fellowship recipient, Ph.D. candidate, and sushi connoisseur Jeanna Wieselmann shares her research agenda as she spends the semester in Japan partnering with Shizuoka University.

What is your degree program?

I am in the STEM Education Ph.D. program within the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.  I plan to graduate in May of 2019.

What drove you to enroll in the STEM Education Ph.D. program?

I completed my undergraduate and master’s degrees from the University of Minnesota and spent several years teaching for a STEM non-profit.  As a STEM teacher, I observed students who are traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields excelling.  I wanted to learn more about how to make quality STEM education accessible to all students, through quality curricular materials and support for teachers.  The University of Minnesota has amazing faculty and an integrated STEM program that perfectly matched my research interests.

What is your current research focus?

I am currently interested in gender equity in STEM and am looking at the factors that influence whether girls are interested in pursuing STEM careers.  Girls already tend to have less interest in STEM by the time they reach middle and high school, so I’m focusing primarily on the elementary grade levels in the hopes that quality elementary STEM experiences can help foster continued STEM interest.

You are in Japan this semester working on STEM education. Tell me about your goals for the semester and how the project came about.

I am interested in international perspectives on STEM, and I decided to visit Japan because my adviser, Dr. Gillian Roehrig, has cultivated a strong relationship with Dr. Yoshisuke Kumano from Shizuoka University. I was able to study through my National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. This semester, I am working on two research projects.  The first project investigates middle school students’ perceptions of STEM and interest in STEM careers after participating in STEM activities through various programs.  The second project involves helping with teacher professional development focused on STEM and supporting these teachers as they implement STEM activities in their elementary classrooms for the first time.

What have you found surprising/challenging as an educator and researcher working across international borders?

This certainly hasn’t been a surprise, but the language barrier is a major challenge to conducting research across international borders.  I’m fortunate to be surrounded by Japanese colleagues who are willing to help me, but my ability to understand what is happening in a classroom is limited.  As a researcher, I’m also very aware of my positionality and am cautious about entering a new culture and pushing my beliefs and values on people. I’m working in collaborative groups with Japanese researchers to help ensure that the Japanese perspective is fairly portrayed in the research I conduct.

Which resources have you found through the department to help with your research?

The biggest resource that has helped with my research is the faculty within the department.  I learned a lot through my coursework, and I also have wonderful mentors who are willing to give advice and feedback on my work.  Every time I talk to another professor about my research, I leave with new ideas and new resources to explore. In addition, my fellow graduate students are irreplaceable for the support they provide.

And the key question: have you eaten the most delicious food in Japan?

The food in Japan is absolutely amazing!  There’s great, affordable sushi available everywhere, including the grocery store that’s a block away from my apartment.  One of my favorite meals was Okonomiyaki, a regional specialty of Hiroshima that features a savory pancake topped with cabbage and other veggies, noodles, meat, and a delicious special sauce.

Learn more about the Ph.D. in STEM Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Sato helps to edit new handbook on international teacher education

Professor Misty Sato in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction was part of the editorial team behind recently released SAGE Handbook of Research on Teacher Education. The handbook, co-edited by D. Jean Clandinin at the University of Alberta and Jukka Husu at the University of Turku, Finland, provides an international overview of the current landscape of teacher education, as well as insights about how research can influence future practices and policies.
Within the two-volume handbook, Sato edited “Section Nine: Learning with and from Assessments in Teacher Education.”

Watch a short description of the handbook and an interview with the co-editors:

Learn more about the teacher education degree programs and teacher education research in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Using Art Curriculum in Mainstreaming Special Education Students

Sara Strother, M.Ed. in Arts in Education candidate (2017) writes in the CEHD Vision 2020 blog about the important role arts education can play in the academic and social development of special education students.

She writes that, “research has shown that the practice of “mainstreaming” special education students (placing them in general education classrooms with an inclusive curriculum) can be beneficial to their academic and social development.” Strother notes that this is particularly true in arts education.

As part of her M.Ed. coursework, Strother is developing an art curriculum that benefits both special education students and their general education peers while building a mutual understanding and trust among classmates. Read the full article.

Learn more about Arts in Education programs offered in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

Sato publishes book on teacher preparation and development in China

Mistilina Sato, Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, authored the recently released book, Empowered Educators in China:  How High Performing Systems Shape Teaching Quality, part of the “Empowered Educator” series published by Jossey Bass (A Wiley imprint). This work is part of a three-year policy study that produced a series of international case studies and books based on  high performing jurisdictions that examines how provincial and national policies support teaching quality from recruitment through preparation and hiring, to ongoing career development and leadership opportunities.

Sato is also co-author of the cross-case book Empowered Educators: How High-Performing Systems Shape Teaching Quality Around the World with Linda Darling-Hammond, Dion Burns, Carol Campbell, A. Lin Goodwin, Karen Hammerness, Ee-Ling Low, Ann McIntyre, and Ken Zeichner.

The national book launch will take place in Washington D.C. on June 6, 2017 hosted by the National Center on Education and the Economy.

Inaugural C&I Emerging Scholars Conference highlights student research

Keynote speaker, Maria Asp of the Children’s Theatre Company, presents at the C&I Emerging Scholars Conference

On April 7, the first annual C&I Emerging Scholars Conference was held in Peik Hall to recognize undergraduate and graduate students engaged in projects and research. Organized by the C&I Graduate Student Association (CIGSA) this conference (formerly named C&I Research Day) was reimagined this year in a conference format to highlight the research scholarship of students. The theme for the conference was “examine everything” based on a call to action from our Department Head, Dr. Cynthia Lewis in the Fall to “denounce supremacy, confront hatred, and build socially just classrooms and communities”.

The event kicked off with a keynote from Maria Asp of the Children’s Theatre Company’s Neighborhood Bridges Program. Asp led the group through a critical literacy activity that allowed participants to examine a story from different perspective. After the keynote over 60 C&I students presented their work through paper, roundtable, and poster presentations. The day culminated with an ice cream social in the C&I Children’s Literature Library.

Special thanks to the organizers, Tracy Leitl, Sara Sterner, Lana Peterson, Dan Bordwell, Jeanna Wieselmann, Jeff Henning-Smith, and Ryan Oto, who serve as CIGSA leadership. To see highlights from the event search#ciesc17 on twitter.

C&I students are encouraged to get involved by serving on the planning committee for next year by emailing cigsa@umn.edu.