CEHD News Exercise Science

CEHD News Exercise Science

Tianou Zhang accepts tenure-track position at UTSA

Tianou Zhang, doctoral candidate in School of Kinesiology, has accepted a tenure-track position at the University of Texas-San Antonio (UTSA). Zhang will be an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Nutrition beginning this August. He will teach courses in Exercise and Nutrition, and continue his research on beneficial effects of phytochemicals supplementation in exercise and health. 

Zhang is advised by Li Li Ji, Ph.D., professor in the School and director of the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene & Exercise Science (LPHES).

Grad student Michelle Harbin lead author of research publication


Michelle Harbin, M.S. and doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology and member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of a peer-reviewed article, entitled “Associations of sex, age and adiposity in endothelium-independent dilation in children“. The article is published in the journal Physiological Measurement and examines the association of age, sex and obesity on vascular smooth muscle function. It was observed that vascular smooth muscle function was significantly lower in male children and adolescents suggesting that impaired vascular smooth muscle function and increased cardiovascular disease risk among males may begin in childhood.

Co-authors of this publication in the School of Kinesiology are Hanan Zavala, a current graduate student and Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor and LIHP director.

Michelle Harbin
Hanan Zavala
Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D.

Ph.D. candidate Katlyn Koepp receives research award from Mayo Clinic

Katlyn Koepp, Kinesiology doctoral candidate and member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), recently received the Department of Cardiovascular Disease Circulatory Failure Research Award from the Mayo Clinic. The grant project, titled “Exercise Capacity and Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue in non-HFpEF controls,” will examine the roles of aerobic capacity and abdominal visceral adipose tissue in heart failure patients.

Koepp is advised by Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the LIHP.

 

LIHP members publish in Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging


Michelle Harbin, M.S. and doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology and member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of an article published in the Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article entitled “Intra- and inter-day reproducibility of low-flow mediated constriction response in young adults” examined the relationship of low-flow mediated constriction on maximal dilation during reactive hyperemia as well as the intra- and interday reproducibility of brachial low-flow mediated constriction. It was observed that low-flow mediated constriction did influence the maximal dilation during reactive hyperemia, however, low-flow mediated constriction was found to be variable limiting its potential as a marker of endothelia function.

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and LIHP director, and Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., graduate of the School of Kinesiology are also co-authors on this article.

Michelle Harbin
Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D.
Joe Ostrem, Ph.D.

Dengel presents at Iowa State University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Iowa State University’s Department of Kinesiology on April 5, 2018. The title of Dengel’s talk was, “Developing a Teaching Laboratory for Kinesiology Sciences.”

Ji lab publishes two research articles on oat avenanthramides



Members of the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene and Exercise Science (LPHES) under the directorship of Li Li Ji, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, recently published the following research articles:

Tianou Zhang, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise physiology, is the lead author of the research study titled, “Absorption and Elimination of Oat Avenanthramides (AVAs) in Humans after Acute Consumption of Oat Cookies,” published in Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity (IF=4.593). Coauthors include doctoral student Dongwook Yeo, former research associate Chounghun Kang, and Li Li Ji, Ph.D. The publication discovered that AVAs found naturally in oats are absorbed in the plasma after oral administration in humans.

Chounghun Kang, Ph.D., assistant professor at Inha University, South Korea, and former LPHES research associate, published a research paper on AVAs titled, “Anti-inflammatory Effect of Avenanthramides via NF-κB Pathways in C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cells” in Free Radical Biology and Medicine (IF=5.606).  Dongwook Yeo, Tianou Zhang, and Li Li Ji, Ph.D. are coauthors on this publication. The data in the study indicates that AVAs are potent inhibitors of NFκB-mediated inflammatory response due to their downregulation of IKKβ activity in C2C12 cells.

Avenanthramides (AVA) are a group of compounds found exclusively in oats and are bioavailable to humans. To date, studies have shown that AVAs have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Health benefits of oat avenanthramides may help in the development of value-added products and enhance oat consumption in Minnesota, whose oat production ranks in the top three nationally.

Tianou Zhang
Dr. Chounghun Kang
Dongwook Yeo
Dr. Li Li Ji

Dengel presents on body composition analysis at George Mason University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at George Mason University’s Department of Kinesiology on March 26, 2018. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “Frontiers in Body Composition Analysis: From Infants to NFL Players.”

Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on article published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Christiana Raymond-Pope, M.S., doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. The article, “Total and segmental body composition examination in collegiate football players using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual x-ray absorptiometry,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual X-ray absorptiometry when assessing total and segmental percent body fat, fat mass, and fat-free mass in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football athletes. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., a professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., a graduate of the School of Kinesiology, are also co-authors on the article.

Greising publishes in Cell Death Discovery

Sarah Greising, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, has published an article in the online journal, Cell Death Discovery. “Multiscale analysis of a regenerative therapy for treatment of volumetric muscle loss injury”  explores the regenerative process of injured skeletal muscles resulting from major traumatic injury. The study results suggest that the pathological response to volumetric muscle loss (VML) injury during the acute stage of the healing response overwhelms endogenous and therapeutic regenerative processes.

Dengel and colleagues publish in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and colleagues have published in the online publication, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

The article, “Association between carotid intimata media thickness, age, and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents,” describes their study to determine the relations of measures of carotid intima media thickness with body mass index and cardiovascular risk score in children. The study concluded that maintaining normal levels of adiposity and other risk variables may be useful in preventing early changes associated with preclinical atherosclerosis.

 

Former LIHP graduate student is author of recently published paper


Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a 2016 graduate from the School of Kinesiology and former member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of an article recently published in the journal, Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article, entitled “Intra- and Interday reproducibility of high-flow-mediated constriction response in young adults” examined the reproducibility of a method to measure vascular health. The results of this study indicate high-flow-mediated constriction is reproducible in young adults and should be included to assess vascular health. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the LIHP in the School of Kinesiology, Ostrem’s adviser, is a co-author on this article, as well as current lab members Nick Evanoff and Justin Ryder.

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D.
Dr. Don Dengel
Donald Dengel, Ph.D.

Dengel presents at University of Utah

Dr. Don DengelDonald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Utah in the Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation on February 5. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “Measuring Vascular Function: From Peripheral to Cerebral.”

Dengel shares insight on impact of Olympic Games

With the XXIII Olympic Winter Games opening in Pyeongchang County, South Korea on February 8, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is quoted on the U of M homepage on the long-term impact the Olympic Games can have on host countries. Read the feature here.

During winter break, Dengel led a course in London, England, about the impact of the 1908, 1948 and 2012 Olympics on the city, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and on sport. He also taught Sport and Politics Collide: 1936 & 1972 German Olympics.

Kinesiology’s Betker and Orr involved in 3MT® events


In preparation for this year’s 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition, CEHD is hosting a Mentoring Workshop on February 1. Last year’s University-wide 3MT winner Madeleine Orr, a sport management doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology will serve as a panelist at this event.

In addition, Orr and Kinesiology’s Morgan Betker, doctoral student with a focus on exercise physiology and previous winners of the CEHD 3MT competition are asked to be judges for the preliminary round of the competition, which will be held on Monday, February 26 and Thursday, March 1 of this year.

Madeleine Orr
Madeleine Orr
Morgan Betker
Morgan Betker

Dengel publishes article in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is a co-author of an article recently published online in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.

This article titled “The Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Arterial Stiffness of Pediatric Mucopolysaccharidosis Patients Are Increased Compared to Both Pediatric and Adult Controls” examined vascular health in children with the genetic disease mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). The data from this study suggested that children with mucopolysaccharidoses demonstrated a “structural vascular age” similar to adults who were 40 years older. Indicating the advanced development of cardiovascular disease.

 

Dengel speaks at Hamline University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Hamline University, Biology Department on November 10. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Pediatric Vascular Health: Growing Up.”

Dengel gives talk at University of Maryland

On November 15, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Obesity and Pediatric Vascular Dysfunction: What are the Solutions?”

 

Raymond-Pope, Dengel, and Bosch publish in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Kinesiology doctoral student Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on an article written with kinesiology professor Donald Dengel, Ph.D., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., and published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 

The article, “Total and Segmental Body Composition Examination in Collegiate Football Players Using Multifrequency Bia and Dxa,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between two different means of measurement used in assessing total and segmental percent body fat.

Raymond-Pope is currently advised by Dengel, and Bosch is a former advisee who graduated with his Ph.D. in kinesiology in 2014. Dengel is the director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology in the School of Kinesiology.

Raymond-Pope
Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Tyler Bosch
Dr. Bosch

 

Dengel publishes in Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is lead author of an article published in the journal Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article entitled “Reproducibility of blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes with end-tidal carbon dioxide alterations” examines the reproducibility of a new method to measure cerebral vascular reactivity using blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes in response to alterations in end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure during magnetic resonance imaging.

The methodology developed by this research establishes an accurate method for measuring blood vessel function in the brain, which may be used not only in
the comparison between various groups of individuals but also in longitudinal studies interested in treatment or examination of CVR over time (i.e., aging studies, traumatic brain injury evaluation).

 

Dengel gives talk at Winona State University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Winona State University, Department of Health, Exercise, and Rehabilitative Sciences on November 1, 2017.

The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “The A, B, C’s of Graduate School.”