Category Archives: Graduate Students

Thul’s research quoted in Deadspin article “The Full-Court Pressure of the Somali-American Sportswoman”

The latest posting of online publication Deadspin includes an article, “The Full-Court Pressure of the Somali-American Sportswoman,” which explores the challenges Somali women face in participating in sports and physical activity through the lens of the Somali-American community in Minneapolis.  The research of School of Kinesiology lecturer Chelsey Thul, Ph.D., is discussed extensively, and Thul; Cawo Abdi, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology at the U of M; Sarah Hopkins, head coach of U of M women’s cross country; and Muna Mohamed, Kinesiology master’s student and research assistant, are quoted.

School of Kinesiology Student Council announces 2017-18 officers and representatives

The Kinesiology Student Council recently announced their newly appointed officers/representatives for the 2017 – 2018 academic year.

Co-Presidents: Madeleine Orr and Anna Baeth
Secretary: Christiana Raymond
Treasurer: John Piekarski
Public Relations: Eydie Kramer and Arash Mahnan
Undergraduate Student Reps: Emily Groshens and Courtney Cashman

Zachary Pope, 2016 – 2017 School of Kinesiology Student Council President, said, “I have no doubt that under the leadership of the individuals listed above the Kinesiology Student Council will continue to grow and enhance the student experience within the University of Minnesota’s School of Kinesiology. Myself and the outgoing members of the Kinesiology Student Council Executive Team look forward to helping with a smooth transition of power that ensures the new Executive Team “hits the ground running.”

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Zachary Pope awarded U of M’s Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for 2017-18

Zachary Pope, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate, has been awarded the prestigious University of Minnesota Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for 2017-2018.

Zachary is advised by Kinesiology associate professor Zan Gao, Ph.D., and is a member of the School’s  Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory. His thesis is titled, “Use of Polar M400 to Improve Physical Activity and Eating Behaviors among College Students: A 12-week Randomized Pilot Study.”

The Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship (DDF) gives the University’s most accomplished Ph.D. candidates an opportunity to devote full-time effort to an outstanding research project by providing time to finalize and write a dissertation during the fellowship year.

Zachary is one of just 100 students across the University who received the award this year. Congratulations!

 

Katelyn Uithoven, Ph.D. candidate, receives 2017-18 Kinesiology Doctoral Dissertation Award

Congratulations to Katelyn Uithoven, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate, who has received the 2017-18 Kinesiology Doctoral Dissertation Award. Ms. Uithoven is studying for her doctorate in the emphasis area of exercise physiology and is advised by Eric Snyder, Ph.D. She is a member of the Clinical Exercise Physiology Laboratory. Her thesis is titled, “Clinical Consequences and Lung Fluid Balance based on β-Adrenergic Interactions in Heart Failure.”

The award will provide a 50% research assistantship for the next academic year.

The Doctoral Dissertation Award allows accomplished Kinesiology  doctoral candidates the opportunity to devote efforts to an outstanding research project under the mentorship of the student’s primary faculty adviser.

 

 

Kinesiology’s Human Performance Teaching Lab hosts area high school students in Scrubs, Gloves, and Microscopes program

On April 11th, the School of Kinesiology’s Human Performance Teaching Laboratory (HPTL) hosted 24 high school students from around the metro area, who participated in the University of Minnesota’s Scrubs, Gloves & Microscopes program.

Under the direction of HPTL co-director Don Dengel, Ph.D., graduate students Christiana Raymond, Alex Kasak, Michelle Harbin, Bryce Murphy, Kate Uithoven, Neil Hultgren, Katie Bisch and undergraduate student, demonstrated laboratory exercises on Wingate testing, ultrasound imaging, body composition, pulmonary ventilation and electrocardiogram.

Neil Hultgren, Kin M.S., wins second place in Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition

Neil Hultgren, Kinesiology M.S. student advised by Donald Dengel, Ph.D., director of  the  Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, took second place in the Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition at the University of Minnesota’s 31st Annual Pediatric Research, Education and Scholarship Symposium (PRESS) on April 14, 2017. Neil’s poster presentation was titled: “Central Blood Pressure Regulation in Relation to Hypertension and Adiposity in Youth.” The research is part of Neil’s master’s thesis.

Kinesiology Ph.D. student Chris Curry accepts summer graduate research internship at Mayo Clinic

Christopher Curry, School of Kinesiology Ph.D. student and member of APAL, has accepted a summer position as a graduate research intern in the Physical Ergonomics/Human Factors research department at the Mayo Clinic. At Mayo, Chris will be part of a team working to improve medical device ergonomics, teamwork, health care ergonomics and lean health care systems. Chris’s Ph.D. adviser is Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D.

Kinesiology alumna receives funding from National Institute on Aging

Azizah Jor’dan, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology alumna (Ph.D., 2012), McNair Scholar, and current Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard Medical School recently received funding for her NIA K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Career Development project, entitled “Vascular mechanisms and tDCS treatment of gait and posture in aging and age-related disease.”

The NIA K99/R00 is a career development award presented by the National Institute on Aging as an early career mechanism for postdoctoral fellows to facilitate career advancement.

While at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Jor’dan was advised by Michael Wade, Ph.D. She has published with Dr. Wade and Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D.

Kinesiology’s Madeleine Orr and Morgan Betker awarded wins at CEHD’s Three Minute Thesis competition

image of Morgan Betker and Madelleine Orr, winners at the CEHD 2017 Three Minute Thesis contest
Betker, left, and Orr at 3MT competition

Madeleine Orr and Morgan Betker, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidates and finalists in CEHD’s Research Day Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, won prizes in the Finalist Competition held today, March 28, at the McNamara Alumni Center.

Orr (sport management emphasis, advised by Dr. Yuhei Inoue) was awarded the $500 first prize for her presentation, “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” Betker (exercise physiology emphasis, advised by Dr. Eric Snyder) won the $250 People’s Choice award for her presentation, “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers.

The six finalists from five departments across the college had exactly 3 minutes to explain their research projects in an engaging and easy-to-understand format to a packed room in McNamara.

“Telling a compelling story about your research and its implications in less than 3 minutes is way harder than I thought it was going to be!” said Orr after the event. “But to represent Kinesiology with Morgan, and come away with such great results, was a great experience.”

Betker says, “As researchers, we don’t often get the opportunity to share our passion with people outside of our niche, nor hear others’ perspectives in their chosen emphasis. This competition was an excellent way to not only challenge ourselves and grow professionally, but to broaden our perspectives and find value in the work of fellow graduate students in other fields. I’m very grateful to have been a part of the experience.”

3MT is a worldwide competition that was introduced by the University of Queensland in 2008. This is the second year the college has held the event as part of CEHD Research Day. Judges for today’s event were Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.


Tianou Zhang, Kinesiology PhD candidate, to present at U’s Doctoral Research Showcase April 11

The University’s tenth annual Doctoral Research Showcase will include a presentation by Tianou Zhang, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate and advisee of Li Li Ji, Ph.D., director of the School of Kinesiology.

The Showcase will be held Tuesday, April 11 from 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. in the Great Hall, Coffman Memorial Union.

The goal of the Doctoral Research Showcase is to help doctoral fellows develop their abilities to talk about their research to audiences outside of their disciplines and to gain exposure for their work with key stakeholders.

Mr. Zhang’s research presentation is “Dietary Antioxidant Protection Against Inflammation in Exercise and Obesity.” All Kinesiology colleagues are invited to attend and support Mr. Zhang.

For more information about the event or to view a list of all of this year’s participants, visit: z.umn.edu/drs2017.

Ruth Rath, Kinesiology PhD student, and Wade to publish in EBioMedicine

Ruth Rath, Ph.D. student in Kinesiology,  and Michael Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, have written an article on posture and aging to be published in EBioMedicine, a journal that specializes in publishing research and commentary on translational medicine.

The title of the article is, “The two faces of postural control in older adults: Stability and Function.”

Wade is a research scientist in Kinesiology’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) and Rath is a graduate assistant and graduate student researcher in the lab. She is advised by Wade and Kinesiology professor Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D.

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Kim will publish in Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport

Young Ho Kim, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has had a paper accepted for publication in the Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport. The paper, entitled “The Normalization of Sport Corruption and Interdependence of the Factors: Symbiosis of Threefolding’s Organism,” examines 1) how sport corruption is normalized in certain sport organizations and societies, and 2) how sport corruption, through the process of normalization, is produced and reproduced in their organic system. Young is advised by Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., and Rayla Allison, JD.

HSCL colleagues’ article listed as one of most influential papers of 2016 by Veterinary Clinics: Equine Practice

The journal Veterinary Clinics: Equine Practice has published a summary of the most influential papers in equine medicine for 2016. One of these is by Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL) colleagues in collaboration with a group of equine veterinarians from the University of Minnesota/Michigan State University. The paper is entitled “The Equine Movement Disorder “Shivers” Is Associated with Selective Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Axonal Degeneration.”

Valberg SJ, Lewis SS, Shivers JL, Barnes NE, Konczak J, Draper AC, Armién AG. Vet Pathol. 2015 Nov;52(6):1087-98. doi: 10.1177/0300985815571668

Betker and Orr are finalists in CEHD Three Minute Thesis Competition

Morgan Betker
Madeleine Orr

Two Kinesiology doctoral candidates are finalists in CEHD’s Research Day competition, Three Minute Thesis (3MT), which will be held March 28  from 10-11 a.m. in the McNamara Alumni Center Johnson Room.

Morgan Betker (exercise physiology emphasis) and Madeleine Orr (sport management emphasis) will be competing with six doctoral students from across the college for the first prize of $500. Prizes of $250 will go to the runner-up and people’s choice. The finalists were chosen from a preliminary round competition held last week.

Ms. Betker’s presentation is “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers” and Ms. Orr’s presentation is “The rhetoric vs. the reality of sport event legacies.”

3MT is an annual competition held in over 200 universities worldwide. It’s designed to challenge Ph.D. students to present their research in just three minutes in an engaging format that can be understood by an audience with no background in their discipline. The competition is intended to help students develop a presentation on their research and hone their academic communication skills to explain their work effectively to a general audience.

Judges in the CEHD competition are Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African-American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.

Pope awarded $1200 COGS Travel Grant to present at SHAPE America’s national convention 

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has been awarded a $1200 Council of Graduate Students (COGS) Travel Grant to present two posters and give one oral presentation at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention held in Boston March 14-18. Pope is advised by Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory.

COGS is a University-wide student organization that represents, advocates for, and supports graduate students at the U of M. The travel grant supports students who present original work at a conference with a poster, oral presentation, or other acceptable format.  The maximum award is $1200.

While at the SHAPE America Convention, Pope will also be awarded a 2017 Research Council Graduate Student Research Award by SHAPE America for his project, “Validity of Smartwatches in Assessing Energy Expenditure and Heart Rate.”

Russell, White, and Wiese-Bjornstal publish study in Sage Publications

School of Kinesiology alumna Hayley Russell, Ph.D. (2014), is the lead author on an article just released by Sage Publications. Co-authors are Andrew White, Kinesiology Ph.D. student, and their adviser, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., Kinesiology professor. Dr. Russell is currently a faculty member at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN.

The complete citation is: Russell, H. C., White, A. C., & Wiese-Bjornstal, D. M. (2017). Physical and psychological changes during marathon training and running injuries: An interdisciplinary, repeated-measures approach. SAGE research methods cases. London, UK: Sage Publications.

HSC lab publishes on exercise and brain dysfunction

Y-Ting Tseng, Sanaz Khosravani, and Arash Mahnan, all graduate students in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL), together with their adviser Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor and lab director, published in the journal Kinesiology Review. Their review titled “Exercise as Medicine for the Treatment of Brain Dysfunction: Evidence for Cortical Stroke, Cerebellar Ataxia, and Parkinson’s Disease” addresses the role of exercise as an intervention for treating neurological disease. It focuses on three major neurological diseases that either present in acute or neurodegenerative forms—Parkinson’s disease, cerebellar ataxia, and cortical stroke.

The paper is part of a series of invited papers from the National Academy of Kinesiology that appear in Kinesiology Review. Maureen Weiss, Ph.D. serves as the current editor of the journal.

Wiese-Bjornstal will present at Florida State University’s SPEAR conference

Wiese-BjornstalD-2015On February 9, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab,  will be the keynote speaker at  Florida State University’s Sport Professionals’ Experience and Research (SPEAR) conference hosted by the student-led graduate organization, Sport Psychology Organization & Research Team (SPORT). Dr. Wiese-Bjornstal will be giving two invited lectures about evidence-based research and evidence-based practice in sports medicine psychology.

Wiese-Bjornstal, alumna Russell, publish in SAGE Research Methods

Wiese-Bjornstal
Russell

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and Ph.D. alumna Hayley Russell, ’14, have published a research methods case study in SAGE Research Methods Cases. Russell is an assistant professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN. The case is titled “A Narrative Approach to Understanding Psychological Stories of Overuse Injuries Among Long-Distance Runners,” and it investigates the experiences of athletes with overuse injuries, specifically long-distance runners, by means of a narrative methodology.

Read the full study here.

 

Kinesiology graduate student Kate Uithoven is lead author on article in Journal of Vascular Diagnostics and Interventions

Kate Uithoven, M.S./Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Vascular Diagnostics and Interventions. The article entitled “Determination of bilateral symmetry of carotid artery structure and function in children and adolescents” examines symmetry of carotid arteries in youth using high-resolution ultrasound. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., Kinesiology professor and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and Nicholas Evanoff, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, are co-authors on the article.