Category Archives: Labs & Centers

Tucker Center releases report honoring 45th anniversary of Title IX

image of report coverThe Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport has released a report, “Gender, Race & LGBT Inclusion of Head Coaches of Women’s Teams: A Report on Select NCAA Division I Conferences for the 45th Anniversary of Title IX,” in honor of the 45th anniversary of Title IX. This special report is a partnership among LGBT SportSafe, The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida, and the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport at the University of Minnesota.

Race and gender data for head coaches of women’s teams were collected for eight select NCAA Division I conferences including: American Athletic Conference (AAC), Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), Big 12, Big East, Big Ten, the Ivy League, Pacific-12 (Pac-12), and Southeastern Conference (SEC). The conferences selected for this study were chosen to include the “Power 5” (ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12, SEC). Conferences were assigned a grade for race, a separate grade for gender, and recognition was included for LGBT inclusion practices at the institutional and conference level.

Kin PhD student Christiana Raymond is lead author on article published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

Christiana Raymond, M.S., doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the journal, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. The article, “Accuracy and reliability of assessing lateral compartmental leg composition using dual-energy X-ray absoprtiometry,” examined the accuracy and reliability of a novel dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning method in the frontal plane for total, fat, and lean mass quantification of the anterior and posterior upper leg compartments. The article was part of Ms. Raymond’s master’s thesis.

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, Foster Bosch, B.S., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., graduates of the School of Kinesiology, are co-authors on this article.

Lewis’s research cited in Reuters feature on benefits of exercise on postpartum depression

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology with a research focus on behavioral aspects of physical activity, was recently cited in a story published by Reuters.  The Health News feature, titled “Exercise may stave off postpartum depression,” discussed an article recently published by researchers from Spain and Chile. Their findings align with Lewis’s research outcome that regular, low-intensity exercise has a positive effect on postpartum depression.

The study authors didn’t draw conclusions or provide recommendations about the type or length of exercise that would be most beneficial, but suggested that future studies should include more data about the types of physical activity programs that could reduce depression.

Lewis and her colleagues currently are conducting a randomized trial that analyzes home-based exercise and home-based wellness programs among 450 mothers with a history of depression. In another study, they’re analyzing exercise programs among low-income women at risk for postpartum depression.

“Exercise is often the first thing that gets crossed off the list when there’s a new baby,” Lewis said in the article. “It’s important to take care of yourself through exercise to keep that wellbeing high.”

The story also appeared on the English language media outlet, Channel NewsAsia, based in Singapore.

 

 

 

Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory researchers present at ACSM’s 64th Annual Meeting

Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory - logoZan Gao, Ph.D.,  associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the  Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), together with his doctoral students June Lee, Zachary Pope, and Nan Zeng, took part in the American College of Sport Medicine’s (ACSM) 64th Annual Meeting in Denver, CO, held May 30-June 3. At the conference, the lab members presented their research:

Gao, Z., Li, X.X., Zeng, N., Pope, Z., Yang, H.H., Liu, W.F., Xiong, H., Chen, Y.T., Li, J., & He, W. (2017, June). Accuracy of smartwatches in assessing college students’ energy expenditure in exercise with different intensities.

Lee, J., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang. Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Associations among objectively-determined physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and cognitive function in preschool children.

Pope, Z., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Effects of mhealth apps on physical activity and weight loss outcomes: A meta-analysis.

Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Liao, N., Han, C.Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Predicting biomarkers through affordable fitness band in Chinese breast cancer survivors.

Zeng, N., Li, X.X., Yang, H.M., Liu, W.F., Xiong, H., Chen, Y.T., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). The effects of different types of exercise on Chinese college students’ energy expenditure.

Zeng, N., Han, C.Y., Liao, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Examining the relationships among Chinese breast cancer survivors’ psychosocial outcomes and physical fitness.

 

Dengel and students publish book chapter

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology in exercise physiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is lead author of a chapter titled “Assessment of muscle mass” appearing in the book Body Composition: Health and Performance in Exercise and Sport recently published by CRC Press. School of Kinesiology doctoral student Christiana Raymond and School of Kinesiology graduate Dr. Tyler Bosch are also authors on the chapter.

Dengel, students present at ACSM

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology in exercise physiology, and students traveled to the American College of Sport Medicine’s (ACSM) Annual Meeting in Denver, CO held May 30-June 3 to give several presentations.

Poster presentations were:
  • “Total and Segmental Body Composition Examination in Collegiate Football Players Using Multifrequency BIA and DXA.” Christiana Raymond (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology doctoral student), Tyler Bosch (University of Minnesota), Donald Dengel (University of Minnesota).
  • “Effect Of Body Composition And Mass Adjustments On Workload Estimation In NCAA Division I Football Players.” Bryce Murphy (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology master’s student), Donald Dengel (University of Minnesota), Eric Klein (University of Minnesota), Dustin Perry (University of Minnesota), Chad Pearson (University of Minnesota) Tyler Bosch (University of Minnesota).
  • “Effects of Multiple Sports Related Concussions On Neurocognition and Cerebral Vascular Function.” Nicholas Evanoff (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology doctoral student), Kara Marlatt (University of Minnesota), Bryon Mueller (University of Minnesota), Suzanne Hecht (University of Minnesota), Jeffery Wozniak (University of Minnesota), Kelvin Lim (University of Minnesota), Donald Dengel (University of Minnesota).
  • “Body Composition And Bone Mineral Density Of Division I Collegiate Track And Field Athletes.” Donald Dengel (University of Minnesota), Kathryn Keller (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology undergraduate student), Aaron Carbuhn (Kansas University), Philip Stanforth (University of Texas-Austin), Jonathan Oliver (Texas Christian University), Tyler Bosch (University of Minnesota).
  • “Validation of a Three-Dimensional Body Scanner for Body Composition Measures.” Michelle Harbin (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology doctoral student).
  • “Body Composition And Bone Mineral Density Of NCAA Division I Football Players” (oral presentation). Tyler Bosch (University of Minneasota), Aaron Carbuhn (Kansas University), Philip Stanforth (University of Texas-Austin), Jonathan Oliver (Texas Christian University), Kathryn Keller (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology undergraduate student), Donald, Dengel (University of Minnesota).

Media microaggressions against female athletes, female athletes of color, show increase

An online article in Phys.org reveals that microaggressions against female athletes in the media increased by nearly 40 percent from the 2012 Summer Olympic Games to the 2016 Summer Olympic Games.

Female athletes have a history of experiencing microaggressions, such as racism, sexism, the belittling of athletic accomplishments and being the brunt of sexual jokes. Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Journalism also report that  Cynthia Frisby, an associate professor of strategic communication at Mizzou, found evidence of increased microaggressions against female athletes of color compared to white athletes.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-06-media-microaggressions-female-olympic-athletes.html#jCp

Lavoi interviewed on Way of Champions podcast

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is featured in a Way of Champions podcast, in which she discusses a variety of issues, including women in sport leadership, women in coaching, kids’ participation in sports, “background anger,” and the connection between winning at sports and character development. Listen here.

Women Coaches Report cited in article on UM Duluth gay coach lawsuit

Data from the Tucker Center’sWomen Coaches Report Card Series,” authored by Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., was cited in a Grand Forks Herald article, “Gay coaches counter University of Minnesota Duluth’s claims in $18 million lawsuit.” UMD’s Director of Marketing and Public Relations noted UMD’s “A grade” for the percentage of women’s teams with female head coaches.

Barr-Anderson, students present at ACSM

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., and students traveled to the American College of Sport Medicine’s Annual Meeting in Denver, CO held May 30-June 3 to give several presentations. Barr-Anderson is an assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology in behavioral aspects of physical activity.

Tutorial: Hot Fitness Trends to Promote Health and Physical Activity in Minority Communities – Yoga. Daheia Barr-Anderson

Oral Presentation: Exploring the link between exercise identity and intervention dosage: I-FIT (Initiating Feelings of Individual Transformation). Eydie Kramer, Kinesiology doctoral student; Daheia Barr-Anderson

Poster Presentation: Vertical jump test as a health-promotion screening tool for predicting bone strength in young adults. Maggie King, Kinesiology doctoral student; Steven Levy, Lucas Carr, and Kathleen Janz, Iowa State University

Kramer is recipient of inaugural Drinkwalter Fellowship for Nutrition Research

images of Eydie KramerThe inaugural fellowship for the Roger W. and Ann T. Drinkwalter Fellowship for Nutrition Research has been awarded to Eydie Kramer, a School of Kinesiology doctoral student in Behavioral Aspects of Physical Activity under the guidance of Dr. Daheia Barr-Anderson, assistant professor. The Drinkwalter Fellowship was established in 2016 through a generous endowment from Mrs. Ann T. Drinkwalter as a continuing legacy to her husband Roger’s and her mutual, lifelong interest and professional dedication to food- and nutrition-related fields. The fellowship supports graduate students in CEHD’s School of Kinesiology who are pursuing research in nutrition as an important context for critical factors related to health and well-being.

Gao’s research on exergaming highlighted in CEHD Vision 2020 blog

School of Kinesiology associate professor Zan Gao, Ph.D., has written an article on his work related to the positive health outcomes of fitness technology and exergaming on the CEHD Vision 2020 blog.

His research shows that replacing younger students’ “screen time” on tablets or computers with apps for exercise games can be as effective as physical education classes.

Gao emphasizes that exercise games on the computer do not replace time playing outside or the traditional physical education curriculum. Instead, he says, “we hope that active, fitness-oriented apps and games can replace sedentary time young people spend using tablets, watching television or playing traditional games – not physical activities like sports, biking or outside play.”

“Exercise games are not just a fad,” says Gao,  “and can be part of our approach to capturing the attention of students who are not drawn to athletics and physical education.”

Gao is director of the School’s Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory.

 

Dengel quoted on positive effects of exercise on circulation in Experience Life

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology was recently quoted in the June issue of Experience Life, an online health and fitness magazine, on how exercise improves circulation. “The circulatory system loves exercise,” Dengel says in the article, and explains that exercise makes the circulatory system stronger, more flexible, and more expansive, which in turn boosts athletic performance. The article can be accessed here.

Dahia Barr-Anderson and Sanaz Khosravani receive 2017 Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle awards

Dr. Barr-Anderson
Ms. Khosravani

A faculty member and doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology have been selected to receive awards from the College of Education and Human Development’s Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle (WPLC).

Dahia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School, has received the Rising Star Faculty Award of $1,500 to use for professional development.  She joins an elite group of CEHD female faculty members in the college who have received this prestigious award.

Sanaz Khosravani, a Kinesiology doctoral student in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, will receive a $1,400 Graduate Student Ph.D. award based on the review committee’s assessment of her “academic achievements, community involvement, leadership, and passion for her academic and professional career.”

The awards will be conferred at the WPLC’s annual celebration on Tuesday, June 13, at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul.

Thul’s research quoted in Deadspin article “The Full-Court Pressure of the Somali-American Sportswoman”

The latest posting of online publication Deadspin includes an article, “The Full-Court Pressure of the Somali-American Sportswoman,” which explores the challenges Somali women face in participating in sports and physical activity through the lens of the Somali-American community in Minneapolis.  The research of School of Kinesiology lecturer Chelsey Thul, Ph.D., is discussed extensively, and Thul; Cawo Abdi, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology at the U of M; Sarah Hopkins, head coach of U of M women’s cross country; and Muna Mohamed, Kinesiology master’s student and research assistant, are quoted.

Lewis promoted to full professor

The Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota has approved the promotion of the School of Kinesiology‘s director designate Beth Lewis, Ph.D., to the rank of full professor. A ceremony was held at the MacNamara Alumni Center to honor Dr. Lewis and others who were promoted.

Dr. Lewis’ research focuses on examining the efficacy of nonface-to-face behavioral interventions for physical activity promotion among sedentary adults. Recent studies are examining the effect of exercise on preventing postpartum depression.

Congratulations, Professor Lewis!

Weiss publishes in The Sage Encyclopedia of Out-of- School Learning

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, published an article, “Positive youth development through sport” in the just-released anthology by Sage on after-school and out-of- school programs related to teaching methods and learning styles. The two-volume series covering over 200 articles documents what the best research has revealed about out-of- school learning—what facilitates or hampers it; where it takes place most effectively; how we can encourage it to develop talents and strengthen communities; and why it matters.

Gao is co-investigator on NIH grant to study physical activity in older adults

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory in the School of Kinesiology, recently collaborated with researchers from the U of M and successfully secured a 5-year NIH R21/33 research grant as a co-investigator. The project titled “Mindful Movement for Physical Activity and Wellbeing in Older Adults: A Community Based Randomized Hybrid Effectiveness-Implementation Study” (1R21AT009110-01A1) will be led by Dr. Roni Evans, Research Director of the Integrative Health & Wellbeing Research Program at the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

Physical inactivity has reached pandemic proportions and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Of particular concern is that most middle to older age adults fall far short of recommendations for health-enhancing physical activities. This project takes a novel approach to tackling this problem by combining mindfulness with behavioral strategies in a unique ‘Mindful Movement’ program offered through YMCA community facilities. Gao will serve as the physical activity assessment specialist in the team to lead the measurement of the primary outcome – older adults’ moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Tucker Center’s “Media Coverage and Female Athletes” video rebroadcast

Media Coverage and Female Athletes
Media Coverage & Female Athletes

The Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to announce several new airings of the video in May of 2017 of its groundbreaking video, “Media Coverage and Female Athletes.”

tpt MN Channel 2.2
Friday, May 12, 2017 at 5:00 AM
Friday, May 12, 2017 at 11:00 PM

The video builds on a research-based examination of the amount and type of coverage given to female athletes with commentary from expert scholars and award winning coaches and athletes who discuss this timely issue from a variety of perspectives as they help dispel the common—but untrue—myths that “sex sells” women’s sport, and no one is interested in it anyway. Effective strategies for increasing media coverage and creating images which reflect the reality of women’s sports participation and why this is so important are also discussed.

To view the entire program online now, click here. For more information on upcoming broadcasts, click here.

Lewis and colleagues publish in Women’s Health

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues (including her advisees Lauren Billing, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate,  and Katie Schuver, Kinesiology Ph.D., 2014 ) have had an article published in Women’s Health.

The article is titled “The relationship between employment status and depression symptomatology among women at risk for postpartum depression.”