CEHD News Labs & Centers

CEHD News Labs & Centers

Barr-Anderson delivers seminar presentation to UW-Madison’s Department of Kinesiology

On March 9, Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented “Halting the Obesity Trajectory: Family-based Interventions for African-American Females” to the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on article published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Christiana Raymond-Pope, M.S., doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. The article, “Total and segmental body composition examination in collegiate football players using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual x-ray absorptiometry,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual X-ray absorptiometry when assessing total and segmental percent body fat, fat mass, and fat-free mass in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football athletes. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., a professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., a graduate of the School of Kinesiology, are also co-authors on the article.

Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell, Kinesiology B.S., awarded UROP grant to work in APAL

Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell, Kinesiology B.S. student, has been awarded a UROP grant that will support her work as an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) directed by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.DHayley’s funded project is “The Role of Chromaticity in the Visual Control of Stance.” Her adviser for the project is Dr. Stoffregen, and she will be working directly with Kinesiology Ph.D. student Ruth Rath.

Japan Times article features Inoue and colleagues

image of Yuhei InoueAn article,”College sports reformers stay positive despite setbacks,” appearing in The Japan Times features Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology. The article emphasizes Inoue and colleagues’ joint research project with Japan’s University of Tsukuba, Temple University and Dome Corporation to allow sport teams to be formally recognized as belonging to a university, much as in the U.S. NCAA.

WCCO/CBS MN interviews LaVoi on coaches report card

WCCO/CBS Minnesota has interviewed Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. for the article, “The Report Card: Why Aren’t More Women Coaching Women?” LaVoi talks about the women coaches report card grading, and notes the U of M is only one hire away from an “A” grade.

Spokesman-Recorder on LaVoi’s new hiring report

The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder News Online (MSR) has released an article, “New reports show little progress in college sport race, gender hiring,” featuring the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport’s recently released report, “Head coaches of women’s collegiate teams: A report on seven select NCAA Division-I conferences, 2017-18” authored by Tucker Center co-director and senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. MSR reporter Charles Hallman quotes LaVoi on the very slight rise in hiring of women head coaches of women’s teams, saying “It’s better than going in reverse.” The article also features The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) report, “Racial and Gender Report Card,” authored by Dr. Richard Lapchick (College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida).

Dengel presents at East Carolina University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at East Carolina University’s Department of Kinesiology in Greenville, NC, on February 27. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “From Peripheral to Cerebral Blood Vessels: The Impact of Vascular Dysfunction.”

PAEL lab’s Pope, Zeng, Lee, and Gao publish in Translational Behavioral Medicine

Zach Pope
Dr. Zan Gao

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology and a member of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), is first author on a recently published article in Translational Behavioral Medicine titled, “Feasibility of Smartphone Application and Social Media Intervention on Breast Cancer Survivors’ Health Outcomes.” The article’s co-authors include lab member Nan Zeng, Ph.D. candidate, former lab member June Lee, Ph.D.Zan Gao, Ph.D., lab director, as well as Hee Yun Lee, Ph.D. from the University of Alabama.

The study investigates the feasibility of employing a commercially available mobile health application and social media-based health education intervention to improve breast cancer survivors’ physical activity and health. Observations indicate that the 10-week intervention designed to increase physical activity duration and steps per day decreases body weight and body fat percentage. Improvements in breast cancer survivors’ quality of life were also observed.

Dengel and colleagues publish in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and colleagues have published in the online publication, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

The article, “Association between carotid intimates media thickness, age, and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents,” describes their study to determine the relations of measures of carotid intima media thickness with body mass index and cardiovascular risk score in children. The study concluded that maintaining normal levels of adiposity and other risk variables may be useful in preventing early changes associated with preclinical atherosclerosis.


Stoffregen publishes in newest Kinesiology Review issue

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory,  published in a recent issues of Kinesiology Review. In his article titled “Ecological Physics and the Perceptual Information That Supports Motor Control,” he discusses the nature of perceptual information and implications for kinesiology.

Kinesiology Review is the official publication of the National Academy of Kinesiology (NAK) and the American Kinesiology Association (AKA).


Ozy.com profile of US Hockey’s Hilary Knight quotes Tucker Center’s Kane

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an Ozy.com profile of US Olympic Hockey star Hilary Knight, “Team USA’s Hockey Star Has A Higher Goal: Equal Pay.” Kane says “the team’s ability to convert frustration into actionable progress has major historical significance.”

Kane podcast on WiSP Sports: “Limited sport coverage for female athletes”

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is featured in a WiSP Sports “Talking Point” podcast discussing how sport can be a site of resistance and empowerment for women. The podcast and transcript, “How Women’s Status in Sport is Contained by Men,” is a discussion of Kane’s “perspectives on why women’s sports coverage is so limited and why the focus on women’s athletes tends towards sexual objectification instead of their physical and athletic capacities.” WiSP Sports Radio is the world’s largest podcast network for women’s sport featuring more than 760 episodes and 30 unique shows with a global reach of 1.6 million.


credit – A WiSP Sports Production

Former LIHP graduate student is author of recently published paper

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a 2016 graduate from the School of Kinesiology and former member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of an article recently published in the journal, Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article, entitled “Intra- and Interday reproducibility of high-flow-mediated constriction response in young adults” examined the reproducibility of a method to measure vascular health. The results of this study indicate high-flow-mediated constriction is reproducible in young adults and should be included to assess vascular health. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the LIHP in the School of Kinesiology, Ostrem’s adviser, is a co-author on this article, as well as current lab members Nick Evanoff and Justin Ryder.

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D.
Dr. Don Dengel
Donald Dengel, Ph.D.

Wiese-Bjornstal quoted in corporate publication 3M Particles

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, is quoted in the article, “Don’t let your injury get the best of you: The role of mental fitness in rehabilitation,” by Janna Fischer. It appears in the online corporate publication, 3M Particles, which features stories about science applied to life. The article discusses the mental challenges of returning from sport- and exercise-related injuries.

HSC lab publishes first study in 2018 on abnormal muscle activity in horses with shivers disease

In an interdisciplinary collaboration with partners in veterinary medicine at the University of Minnesota and the Michigan State University, researchers in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory examined horses with shivers disease.

An earlier study identified the previously unknown neuropathology of the disease – a degeneration of neurons in the cerebellum. Because the cerebellum is involved in coordinating the control of muscles during movement, the researchers wanted to find out how the loss of cerebellar function affects the muscle recruitment in these horses. Like humans, horses activate more muscle fibers if they want to run faster. However, these horses recruited more muscles and more muscle fibers than necessary, which led to a loss of movement coordination and problems in their balance.

The results of this study, “Abnormal locomotor muscle recruitment activity is present in horses with shivering and Purkinje cell distal axonopathy,” are published in a paper that appears in Equine Veterinary Journal. Joshua Aman, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral researcher in the lab, is the first author of the paper. Other co-authors are current lab member Naveen Elangovan, Ph.D., and Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.professor in the School of Kinesiology.



Dengel presents at University of Utah

Dr. Don DengelDonald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Utah in the Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation on February 5. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “Measuring Vascular Function: From Peripheral to Cerebral.”

Barr-Anderson presents at Minne-College in Arizona

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented at Minne-College in Arizona held in Scottsdale, AZ, on February 10. The title of her presentation was “Move More to Weigh Less: The Importance of Physical Activity to Address Childhood Obesity.” Also attending were CEHD Dean Jean Quam, Serena Wright, CEHD Sr. Alumni Director, and a number of U of M alumni. Minne-College in Arizona is sponsored by the U of M Alumni Association.

Konczak gives talk to U of M ataxia group colloquium

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, gave a lecture on “Somatosensory training to overcome motor dysfunction in dystonia and Parkinson’s disease” to the University of Minnesota ataxia research group. The ataxia group is an interdisciplinary group of basic science and clinical researchers interested in understanding the neuropathology of ataxia and its treatment. Dr. Konczak spoke about how a sensory-based rehabilitation training can improve motor function in focal dystonia and Parkinson’s disease.

KARE-11 features Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report in story on National Girls and Women in Sports Day

KARE 11 TV gave a nod to the Tucker Center’s  2017- 18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences in their story related to the National Girls and Women in Sports Day celebration on February 7. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, was interviewed for the story and said the report “hopefully stimulates dialogue, raises awareness, helps to recruit and retain more women in the coaching profession, and holds decision-makers who hire coaches more accountable.”