Category Archives: Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL)

Ruth Rath, Kinesiology PhD student, and Wade to publish in EBioMedicine

Ruth Rath, Ph.D. student in Kinesiology,  and Michael Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, have written an article on posture and aging to be published in EBioMedicine, a journal that specializes in publishing research and commentary on translational medicine.

The title of the article is, “The two faces of postural control in older adults: Stability and Function.”

Wade is a research scientist in Kinesiology’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) and Rath is a graduate assistant and graduate student researcher in the lab. She is advised by Wade and Kinesiology professor Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D.

Stoffregen featured in latest Science News cover story

The cover story of the March 18 issue of Science News includes the latest research being conducted by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL). Stoffregen is quoted extensively on his work related to virtual reality, motion sickness, and the sex connection.

 

Stoffregen quoted in ScienceNews

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was interviewed about his research related to motion sickness and virtual reality for the March 18 edition of ScienceNews. A number of researchers believe that sensory mismatch is to blame for the motion sickness that can be present with virtual reality use, but Stoffregen believes that instability is the culprit. The full article can be accessed here.

Stoffregen also is lab director for the School’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory.

Stoffregen appointed to Gait & Posture board

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has accepted an appointment to the editorial board for Gait & Posture, one of the pre-eminent journals in the field of Movement Science. The journal is a vehicle for the publication of up-to-date basic and clinical research on all aspects of locomotion and balance.

Gait & Posture has a 1-year Impact Factor of 2.286, and a 5-Year Impact Factor of 2.864.

Stoffregen to publish in Ecological Psychology

StoffregenT_2015A study by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), along with Bruno Mantel and Benoit G. Bardy, has been accepted for publication in Ecological Psychology. The article is titled “The senses considered as one perceptual system.”

While peer-reviewed, the article was invited as part of a special issue commemorating the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems, by James J. Gibson, one of the foundational statements of the Ecological Approach to Perception and Action.

Dr. Mantel is on the faculty at the University of Caen, while Dr. Bardy is on the faculty at the University of Montpellier, both in France.

Stoffregen quoted in Australian ABC News

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), is quoted in the Science News section of ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). In the article, he discusses seasickness and how to prevent it, based on his research on motion sickness and postural sway.

Read the full article here.

Stoffregen co-authors article in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

StoffregenT_2015The research study “Perceiving nested affordances for another person’s actions” co-authored by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has been accepted for publication in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.

The other co-authors are:

  • Dr. Jeffrey Wagman, Illinois State University
  • Jiuyang Bai, Ph.D. Student at Illinois State University
  • Daniel Schloesser, Masters Student at Illinois State University

Postural sway research published in PLOS ONE

StoffregenT_2015
Thomas Stoffregen
WadeM-2012
Michael Wade

The research study “The rim and the ancient mariner: The nautical horizon affects postural sway in older adults,” co-authored by School of Kinesiology’s  Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), and Michael Wade, Ph.D., has been published in the widely read science journal, PLOS ONE.

The other co-authors are:

  • Justin Munafo, APAL grad student and Ph.D. candidate
  • Dr. Nick Stergiou, University of Nebraska at Omaha
The article reports research that was conducted aboard the Semester at Sea, a sea voyage that traveled from Nassau to Santo Domingo. Read the full article here.

 

Stoffregen quoted on virtual reality sickness in women in online article

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), is quoted in the online magazine NewScientist.com. The article, “Posture could explain why women get more VR sickness than men,” is based on Stoffregen’s recently published study in Experimental Brain Research.

In the research study, Stoffregen and his students Justin Munafo and Meg Diedrick found that the gaming headset Oculus Rift causes more nausea in women than in men.

Online magazine ScienceNews quotes Stoffregen on virtual reality and motion sickness

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), is quoted in the online magazine ScienceNews.org. The article, “Virtual reality raises real risk of motion sickness,” is based on Stoffregen’s recently published study in Experimental Brain Research.

In the research study, Stoffregen and his students Justin Munafo and Meg Diedrick found that the gaming headset Oculus Rift causes nausea moreso in women than in men.

International Conference on Physical Education and Sport Science invites Stoffregen to serve on Scientific Committee

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has accepted an invitation to serve on the Scientific Committee for the International Conference on Physical Education and Sport Science, held October 2-4, 2017 in Cappadocia, Turkey.

Stoffregen and students publish in Experimental Brain Research

The research study “The virtual reality head-mounted display Oculus Rift induces motion sickness and is sexist in its effects,” by Justin Munafo, Meg Diedrick, and Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., has been published in the journal Experimental Brain Research.

Thomas Stoffregen is the director of the School of Kinesiology’s  Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) where Justin Munafo, a Kinesiology PhD student and DOVE scholar, and Meg Diedrick, an undergraduate research assistant supported by a Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award, are advised by Dr. Stoffregen.

StoffregenT_2015diedrick_megmunafoj-2016

Stoffregen co-authors article in Experimental Brain Research

StoffregenT_2015The research study “Dynamic perception of dynamic affordances: Walking on a ship at sea”, co-authored by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., director of the School of Kinesiology’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has been accepted for publication in Experimental Brain Research.

The other co-authors are:
The data were collected aboard the R/V Thomas G. Thompson in January 2016 after the researchers had endured 48 hours of hurricane conditions. The video below shows hurricane force winds in the Pacific Northwest, January 12, 2016, as seen from the main deck starboard portal of a US scientific research vessel transiting from Seattle to San Diego.

 

Stoffregen featured in article on VR and motion sickness in women in online pub Inverse

StoffregenT_2015Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was interviewed for an article in the online publication Inverse on the issue of virtual reality systems (VR) causing motion sickness, which appears to affect women in disproportionate numbers.

In the article,”Playstation VR Has a Short Woman Problem,” Stoffregen says: “I don’t think that this design is intentional, but it just so happens that the design of these systems push the instability buttons on some sorts of bodies. They tend to affect shorter bodies with a lower center of mass. That is to say, females.”

He goes on to say that the issue could create future legal problems for the industry. Read the full article here.

Stoffregen co-authors piece in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied

StoffregenT_2015“Passive restraint can reduce visually induced motion sickness in older adults,” by Behrang Keshavarz, Alison Novak, Lawrence Hettinger, Jennifer Campos and Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Experimental Pyschology: Applied.

Dr. Keshavarz, Ms. Novak, and Ms. Campos are from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, and Dr. Hettinger is a Principal Researcher at the Liberty Mutual Institute for Safety. Professor Stoffregen is the  director of the School of Kinesiology’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL).

 

Wade appointed to Dept. Veteran Affairs’ Scientific Merit Review Board

WadeM-2012Michael Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, has been appointed to the Scientific Merit Review Board of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for a 4-year term. Dr. Wade will serve on the Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease Study section.

The board gives advice and evaluation of research grants that are supported by VA research funds.

 

Wade has article accepted by Human Movement Science

WadeM-2012Michael Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, has had an article accepted by Human Movement Science (HMS). “Developmental Coordination Disorder and its cause: The road less traveled,” will appear as a target article in a special edition of HMS , which will include invited commentary.

Stoffregen quoted in Vice article on Virtual Reality

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology professor and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), was interviewed for an article by Motherboard, a news channel of Vice. His research has found that women are more susceptible to motion sickness, affecting the design of virtual reality sets for women.

“VR companies need to stop looking at this as an issue of technology design,” Stoffregen states in the article. “It’s an issue of how the user and the technology interact.” He adds: “First off, companies need to recognize that their products are sexist. Not sexist by intent; rather, sexist in their effects.”

Motherboard is an online magazine and video channel dedicated to the intersection of technology, science and humans.

Read the full article here.

Stoffregen’s research featured on “Stuff You Should Know”

StoffregenT_2015On a recent podcast on the site, “Stuff You Should Know,” Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., and his research were referenced extensively in How Motion Sickness Works starting at about 20.00. Stoffregen is a professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory.

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Justin Munafo accepts two-year position at Google

Justin MunafoJustin Munafo, Ph.D. candidate in Kinesiology advised by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has accepted a two-year position working at Google in Mountain  View, CA. His title is Researcher III, and he will be conducting experiments with a driving simulator to inform design decisions for Google Maps and related applications. The position begins August 15. He will be working at Google through Adecco, a hiring agency.