CEHD News Exercise & Mental Health Lab (EMHL)

CEHD News Exercise & Mental Health Lab (EMHL)

Lewis is co-author of article on fall prevention and physical activity resources for older adults

LewisBeth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology,  is a co-author with U of M colleagues from the School of Nursing, the School of Public Health, and the Department of Psychology, an article in The Gerontologist. “Older Adults’ Utilization of Community Resources Targeting Fall Prevention and Physical Activity”  discusses the effects of older adults knowing about and using local community resources to improve their level of physical activity, which is related to fall prevention in older adults. The study shows that the effects are only short-term and suggests research to identify future strategies.

Lewis blogposts on exercise principles in CEHD Vision2020

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director in the School of Kinesiology, is published in a CEHD Vision 2020 Improving Lives blog article entitled, “Research-Based Principles to Help You Stick to a Regular Exercise Program.” Citing research, Lewis touches on four principles to “help you keep your commitment to exercise.”

Lewis publishes article on sleep pattern changes and postpartum depressive symptoms

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., director and professor in the School of Kinesiology, has published the article “The effect of sleep pattern changes on postpartum depressive symptoms in BMC Women’s Health, a peer-reviewed, open access journal with a focus on the physical, mental, and emotional health of women.

The study finds an increased risk for depressive symptoms later in the postpartum phase if sleep problems with postpartum women worsen or show only minimal improvement over time. One conclusion recommends a six-week postpartum clinic visit to educate women about potential worsening of sleep patterns and to provide strategies for preventing sleep-related problems in order to decrease the risk of postpartum depression.

One of the co-authors is Katie Schuver, Ph.D., research associate in Lewis’s Exercise and Mental Health Laboratory.

Lewis and McAvoy are featured in December 2017 issue of Connect

Connect, the magazine of the College of Education and Human Development, features two School of Kinesiology faculty/emeritus faculty in the December 2017 issue.

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., School director and professor, is featured in “Healthy Moms,” a story about her research in the areas of motivational interventions for physical activity and the relationship between exercise and mental health, and her pivotal studies focused on the role of exercise in preventing postpartum depression. She is also working on a new research project on postpartum depression prevention beginning during pregnancy and continuing through the postpartum phase.

Leo McAvoy, Ph.D., professor emeritus of recreation, park, and leisure studies in the School, was presented the Outstanding Achievement Award last July, the highest honor presented to a University alumnus.  “Everybody outside!” recounts his many years as an inspiring, involved, and beloved professor and scholar, driven by deep commitment to and respect for the power of nature and his belief in the value of hands-on education.

Lewis quoted in article on yoga and preventing weight gain in the Minnesota Daily

An article in the October 18 online issue of the Minnesota Daily features a study showing a relationship between the effect of practicing yoga and preventing weight gain. Researchers studied young adults who were overweight five years before the study, and found that those who engaged in yoga had a slight weight loss over time, while those who were not practicing yoga gained weight.  Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director in the School of Kinesiology, was quoted, saying: “[Yoga] has the potential to reach individuals who … want something that combines a physical activity that really deals with not only your mental health but your physical well-being.”

The study is part of a larger research initiative,  Project EAT, which examines nutrition, physical activity and weight status among people in Minnesota ranging from adolescence to adulthood.

 

 

 

 

Lewis is co-investigator on NIH/National Institute of Nursing grant

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology director and professor, is a co-investigator on an NIH/National Institute of Nursing grant (R01 NR016705-01), “Community-based intervention effects of older adults’ physical activity and falls.” The purpose of this study is to identify behavioral change strategies that lead to increased physical activity and in turn lead to a reduction in falls and improved quality of life (QOL) among older adults. She will be working with PI Siobhan McMahon and other co-investigators to refine and consult on the intervention implementation and physical activity assessment. The grant will run through January, 2022.

Lewis served as a faculty mentor for Dr. McMahon’s KL2 Scholars Career Development Program for assistant professors conducting clinical or translational research.

 

 

Lewis’s research cited in Reuters feature on benefits of exercise on postpartum depression

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology with a research focus on behavioral aspects of physical activity, was recently cited in a story published by Reuters.  The Health News feature, titled “Exercise may stave off postpartum depression,” discussed an article recently published by researchers from Spain and Chile. Their findings align with Lewis’s research outcome that regular, low-intensity exercise has a positive effect on postpartum depression.

The study authors didn’t draw conclusions or provide recommendations about the type or length of exercise that would be most beneficial, but suggested that future studies should include more data about the types of physical activity programs that could reduce depression.

Lewis and her colleagues currently are conducting a randomized trial that analyzes home-based exercise and home-based wellness programs among 450 mothers with a history of depression. In another study, they’re analyzing exercise programs among low-income women at risk for postpartum depression.

“Exercise is often the first thing that gets crossed off the list when there’s a new baby,” Lewis said in the article. “It’s important to take care of yourself through exercise to keep that wellbeing high.”

The story also appeared on the English language media outlet, Channel NewsAsia, based in Singapore.

 

 

 

Lewis promoted to full professor

The Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota has approved the promotion of the School of Kinesiology‘s director designate Beth Lewis, Ph.D., to the rank of full professor. A ceremony was held at the MacNamara Alumni Center to honor Dr. Lewis and others who were promoted.

Dr. Lewis’ research focuses on examining the efficacy of nonface-to-face behavioral interventions for physical activity promotion among sedentary adults. Recent studies are examining the effect of exercise on preventing postpartum depression.

Congratulations, Professor Lewis!

Lewis and colleagues publish in Women’s Health

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues (including her advisees Lauren Billing, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate,  and Katie Schuver, Kinesiology Ph.D., 2014 ) have had an article published in Women’s Health.

The article is titled “The relationship between employment status and depression symptomatology among women at risk for postpartum depression.”

Lewis presents two research projects at San Diego conference

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, presented twice at the 38th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Diego, CA., in March 2017.

The research projects Dr. Lewis presented are “Feasibility and efficacy of a physical activity intervention for the prevention of postpartum depression: A randomized trial.” (Lewis, B. A., Schuver, K., Gjerdingen, D., Terrell, C., & Avery, M. ) and “The future of physical activity intervention research: Expanding focus to sedentary behavior, technology, and dissemination.” (Lewis, B.A., Napolitano, M.A., Buman, M., Williams, D.M., Nigg, C.R.).

Lewis interviewed for online article, “2017’s Best and Worst Cities for an Active Lifestyle”

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, is one of the experts interviewed for WalletHub’s online article, “2017’s Best and Worst Cities for an Active Lifestyle.” The article lists criteria used for evaluating the cities and ranks them. (Minneapolis received an overall ranking of 6 out of 100 cities.)

Dr. Lewis was one of a panel of experts who responded to questions about how people and their families can incorporate active lifestyle changes in their lives, and how to influence change at the policy level. Read the story and Dr. Lewis’s interview here.

 

Frayeh and Lewis publish in International Journal of Exercise Science

Former School of Kinesiology doctoral student Amanda Frayeh Ph.D., now assistant professor for sport studies at Lock Haven University, published a research article titled Sport Commitment Among Adult Recreational Soccer Players: Test of an Expanded Model” in the International Journal of Exercise ScienceCo-author of the article is Amanda’s former adviser Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology.

The study expanded versions of an existing research model to explore psychosocial factors related to adults’ participation in recreational team sport. The purpose is to demonstrate that sport commitment is related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Lewis receives three-year $900,000 grant from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Beth LewisBeth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, has been awarded a three-year $900,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). The grant, “Exercise Intervention for Preventing Perinatal Depression among Low-Income Women,” will examine the influence of exercise and wellness support on depression among pregnant and postpartum women.

According to MCHB publications, perinatal (the period during and after pregnancy) depression affects approximately 14 to 25 percent of pregnant women and is used to describe a range of conditions including,  prenatal depression, postpartum blues, postpartum depression, and postpartum psychosis.

Previously, Lewis was awarded a $1.46 million grant, “Effect of Exercise and Wellness Interventions on Preventing Postpartum Depression,” from the National Institute of Mental Health.  Results from this research found that higher levels of physical activity were related to fewer depressive symptoms.

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