Category Archives: Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP)

Kinesiology’s Nicolette Peterson and Anna Solfest present at 2017 UROP Symposium

Nicolette Peterson and Anna Solfest, both undergraduate students in the School of Kinesiology, participated in today’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) at the U of M.

Peterson, mentored in the UROP program by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor of movement science and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), presented her research, “The Effect of Feedback on Postural Sway and the Result of Possible Motion Sickness.” Solfest, mentored by Don Dengel, Ph.D., professor of exercise science and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), presented her research, “Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density of Division I Collegiate Male and Female Basketball Athletes.”

Nicolette Peterson
Anna Solfest

Kinesiology’s Dengel featured in CEHD Connect article on Dexalytics

Dr. Don Dengel

Together with CEHD’s Education Technology Innovation (EDI) team, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and his former advisee and partner Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., Research Scientist in Educational Technology Innovations in the College of Education and Human Development at the U of M, are featured in the current CEHD Connect magazine article, “What the body is.”

Dengel and Bosch have developed the Dexalytics tool to utilize massive amounts of DXA (dual-x-ray absorptiometry) body scan data to produce a single, “manageable score for each athlete, the Dexalytics Score, and connect body composition to performance.” With this information they are further able to help coaches and athletes develop individualized training plans.

Kinesiology’s Human Performance Teaching Lab hosts area high school students in Scrubs, Gloves, and Microscopes program

On April 11th, the School of Kinesiology’s Human Performance Teaching Laboratory (HPTL) hosted 24 high school students from around the metro area, who participated in the University of Minnesota’s Scrubs, Gloves & Microscopes program.

Under the direction of HPTL co-director Don Dengel, Ph.D., graduate students Christiana Raymond, Alex Kasak, Michelle Harbin, Bryce Murphy, Kate Uithoven, Neil Hultgren, Katie Bisch and undergraduate student, demonstrated laboratory exercises on Wingate testing, ultrasound imaging, body composition, pulmonary ventilation and electrocardiogram.

Neil Hultgren, Kin M.S., wins second place in Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition

Neil Hultgren, Kinesiology M.S. student advised by Donald Dengel, Ph.D., director of  the  Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, took second place in the Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition at the University of Minnesota’s 31st Annual Pediatric Research, Education and Scholarship Symposium (PRESS) on April 14, 2017. Neil’s poster presentation was titled: “Central Blood Pressure Regulation in Relation to Hypertension and Adiposity in Youth.” The research is part of Neil’s master’s thesis.

Kinesiology’s Madeline Czeck awarded UROP to perform research in LIPH lab

Madeline Czeck, an undergraduate student in the School of Kinesiology, has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Maddy’s UROP will examine total and segmental body composition measures of muscle mass, fat mass, bone density of NCAA Division I softball and baseball players using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). In addition, this research project will also compare the effect of positions (i.e., pitcher, catcher, outfielder, and infielder), usage patterns (i.e., throwing arm versus the non-throwing arm) and gender on total and segmental body composition differences. The project is under the direction of Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIPH).

The UROP Award offers financial awards to full-time undergraduates for quality research, scholarly, or creative projects that are judged to contribute to the student’s academic development and which are undertaken in collaboration with a faculty sponsor.

 

Kinesiology alumna receives funding from National Institute on Aging

Azizah Jor’dan, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology alumna (Ph.D., 2012), McNair Scholar, and current Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard Medical School recently received funding for her NIA K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Career Development project, entitled “Vascular mechanisms and tDCS treatment of gait and posture in aging and age-related disease.”

The NIA K99/R00 is a career development award presented by the National Institute on Aging as an early career mechanism for postdoctoral fellows to facilitate career advancement.

While at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Jor’dan was advised by Michael Wade, Ph.D. She has published with Dr. Wade and Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D.

LIHP recent graduate and lab members publish in Journal of Clinical Ultrasound

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a recent graduate from the School of Kinesiology (2016) is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound. The is article entitled “High-flow-mediated constriction in adults is not influenced by biomarkers of cardiovascular and metabolic risk.” The results of this study demonstrated that increased body mass, fat mass, and body mass index were associated with a greater high-flow mediated constriction.

Dr. Ostrem’s former adviser, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, co-authored this article together with Nik Brinck, a recent undergraduate (2015), Katie Bisch, a master student, and Nick Evanoff, a doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology.

Kinesiology graduate student Kate Uithoven is lead author on article in Journal of Vascular Diagnostics and Interventions

Kate Uithoven, M.S./Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Vascular Diagnostics and Interventions. The article entitled “Determination of bilateral symmetry of carotid artery structure and function in children and adolescents” examines symmetry of carotid arteries in youth using high-resolution ultrasound. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., Kinesiology professor and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and Nicholas Evanoff, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, are co-authors on the article.

Dengel publishes in Journal of Geriatric Cardiology and Pediatric Research

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, has co-authored two recently published articles.

Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction” appeared in the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology.

The article  “Impaired cardiac autonomic nervous system function is associated with pediatric hypertension independent of adiposity” appeared in Pediatric Research and examined whether sympathetic nervous system activity influences hypertension status and blood pressure in children and adolescents. These data suggest that impaired cardiac autonomic nervous system function is associated with higher odds of being prehypertensive/hypertensive and may be independent of adiposity in children and adolescents.

 

 

Kinesiology’s Anna Solfest awarded UROP to perform research in LIPH lab

solfestanna-2016Anna Solfest, a undergraduate student in the School of Kinesiology, has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Anna’s UROP project will examine body composition, bone density, and visceral adipose tissue in male and female NCAA Division I basketball players. The project is under the direction of Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIPH).

The UROP Award offers financial awards to full-time undergraduates for quality research, scholarly, or creative projects that are judged to contribute to the student’s academic development and which are undertaken in collaboration with a faculty sponsor.

Dengel gives invited talks at East Carolina University

DengelD-2005Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, gave two research talks at East Carolina University this month.

The first talk, “Frontiers in Body Composition Analysis From NFL Players to Infants and Beyond,” was presented to students and faculty in the Department of Kinesiology on November 8. The second talk, “The Paradox of Severe Obesity and Vascular Function,” was presented to the Surgical Research Group at the East Carolina University School of Medicine on November 10. 

Dengel presents at Southeastern Pediatric Nutrition Conference

DengelD-2005Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, was invited to present at the Southeastern Neonatal/Pediatric Nutrition Conference on November 11 in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. His presentation was titled “Pediatric Vascular Health: Growing Up.” 

Barr-Anderson, Biltz present at NASPEM conference

Dr. Barr-Anderson
Dr. Barr-Anderson

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, presented a poster entitled “Teachers’ influence on weight-related behaviors of African American preschoolers” at the 2016 North American Society of Pediatric Exercise Medicine (NASPEM) in Knoxville, TN, on August 11. George Biltz, M.D., lecturer in the School, also presented a poster, “Initial Submaximal RER and Tidal Volume Variability Appear Inversely Related to Direction of Response to Marathon Training.” The conference was held from August 10-13.

George Biltz
Dr. Biltz

Formed in 1985, NASPEM’s membership is comprised of medical doctors, researchers, educators, and students interested in pediatric exercise. Their mission is to promote exercise science, physical activity and fitness in the health and medical care of children and adolescents.

LIHP alumni, faculty publish in “Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology”

coverJustin Geijer, Ph.D., (Ph.D., 2015) an assistant professor at Winona State University, is the lead author of an article recently published in Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. The article, “Reproducibility of brachial vascular changes with alterations in end-tidal carbon dioxide,” examined the reproducibility of using carbon dioxide to alter diameter in the brachial artery. The results of this study suggest that carbon dioxide can alter the diameter of the brachial artery, but it is not reproducible enough to use this method to examine vascular health.

This article was part of Dr. Geijer’s dissertation. His advisor, Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is also a co-author on this article as are School alumni Nick Evanoff, Aaron Kelly, Michael Chermin, and Matthew Stoltman.

Dengel quoted in Huffington Post

Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Don Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP) was recently quoted in The Huffington Post on why it is important to change up your workout routines.

Dengel said, “Any form of activity is good activity … but speciality is not the best way to work our bodies. Variety is what we want.”

Read the full article here.

Dengel co-author on article published in Techniques Magazine

DengelD-2005Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology in the School of Kinesiology, is co-author of an article published in the May 2016 issue of Techniques Magazine, published by the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association. The article entitled “Body Composition: Methods and importance for performance and health” examined body composition of track and field athletes in the various disciplines. Olivia Dengel, an undergraduate student at the College of Saint Benedict, was also a co-author on the paper.

School of Kinesiology professors meet with Guatemalan Olympic Committee

 

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Lundstrom
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Biltz
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Dengel

Last week, School Kinesiology Drs. Christopher Lundstrom, George Biltz, and  Donald
Dengel
 traveled to Guatemala City, Guatemala to meet with members of the Guatemalan Sports Confederation and the Guatemalan Olympic Committee to evaluate the two programs.

In addition to evaluating the two sports programs, Drs. Lundstrom, Biltz and Dengel presented to the staff and members of both the Guatemalan Sports Confederation and the Guatemalan Olympic Committee. Dr. Lundstrom presented on “Exercise Testing and Assessment” and “Development of Training Programs Theory” on April 13th. On April 14th, Dr. Dengel gave two presentations: “Sports Nutrition: Fueling Athletes to  the Olympics” and “Body Composition Assessment for Sport.” Dr. Biltz gave two presentations on April 15th. The first being “Physiological Variability Analysis – Potential Applications” and the second being “Pediatric Sports Injuries – A Functional Approach.”

The representatives from the School of Kinesiology also engaged in discussions regarding future collaborations with the Guatemalan Sports Confederation and the Guatemalan Olympic Committee, as well as study abroad opportunities for School of Kinesiology students.

 

Kinesiology alum, adviser involved in multi-million NIH grant

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aaron kelly
Kelly

Kinesiology alumnus Aaron Kelly, Ph.D. (2004), associate professor of pediatrics and medicine in the U of M Department of Pediatrics,  and a colleague, Dr. Jennifer Abuzzahab, received a pilot grant in 2010 from the Clinical and Translational Science Institute to study severe obesity in children. That pilot grant paved the way for a multi-million NIH grant and resulted in the creation of a pediatric obesity research consortium among four major health organizations in Minnesota.

The CTSI-funded pilot project explored the potential of using a drug originally designed for adults with type 2 diabetes to help treat severe obesity in teenagers.  Adolescent participants who took the drug achieved clinically significant weight loss and demonstrated improvements in risk factors for diabetes and heart disease.

Dr. Kelly’s doctoral adviser, Donald Dengel, Ph.D., Kinesiology professor and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Physiology, is working with Dr. Kelly on the grant measuring body composition in subjects. More information is available at this link.

 

 

Dengel publishes book chapter with current student and alumna

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Raymond
Marlatt Kara
Marlatt
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Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is lead author of a book chapter titled “The effects and long-term outlook of cancer therapies on cardiovascular structure and function in childhood cancer survivors.” The chapter appears in the book, Horizons in Cancer Research. Volume 61. Former advisee Kara Marlatt, Ph.D. (2015), and current master’s student and advisee  Christiana Raymond, B.S., are also authors on the chapter.

Complete citation: Dengel DR, Marlatt KL, Raymond CJ: The effects and long-term outlook of cancer therapies on cardiovascular structure and function in childhood cancer survivors. In Watanabe HS (ed.), Horizons in Cancer Research. Volume 61. New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp.149-176, 2016.

Dengel’s research cited in NewsOne

DengelD-2005An article in the online publication News One  cites Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, for his co-authored study on the benefits of standing desks in the classroom. A teacher in San Rafael, CA, has replaced chairs with balance balls in her kindergarten class as a way of channeling the students’ “wiggle time” and improving concentration in learning the alphabet and how to count. Dr. Dengel was quoted in the article for his research findings that students burned more calories  when they stood rather than sat at a desk.