Category Archives: Labs & Centers

Barr-Anderson is lead author on article in Journal of Adolescent Health

Dahiea Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory, is lead Daheia J Barr-Andersonauthor on an article published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. “The Modifying Effects of Race/Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Status on the Change in Physical Activity From Elementary to Middle School” examines whether the association between the change in individual, interpersonal, and environmental factors and the change in physical activity is modified by race/ethnicity or SES.

 

 

Nicholas Evanoff, doctoral student, presents at 2017 TBI Summit

Nicholas Evanoff
Kara Marlatt
Donald Dengel

Nicholas Evanoff, M.S., a kinesiology doctoral student in the School’s  Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the Big Ten/Ivy League Traumatic Brain Injury Research Collaboration’s 2017 TBI Summit held in Rosemont, Illinois, on July 19.

The title of Mr. Evanoff’s presentation was “Effects of Multiple Sports-Related Concussions on Neurocognition and Cerebral Vascular Function.” Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and Kara Marlatt, Ph.D., a 2015 graduate of the School of Kinesiology, were co-authors on the presentation.

 

Konczak presents at International Conference of Robotic Rehabilitation in London

 Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, gave an invited presentation at a workshop at the 15th International Conference of Robotic Rehabilitation (ICORR) at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London, UK. The conference was a part of the London Rehab Week, where around a thousand attendees discussed the newest trends in neurorehabilitation. Konczak presented an overview on the current state of how robotic medical devices can be used to diagnose sensory and motor deficits of neurological diseases.

 

 

Tucker Center Title IX anniversary report cited in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

The recent study, Gender, Race & LGBT Inclusion of Head Coaches of Women’s Teams: A Report on Select NCAA Division I Conferences for the 45th Anniversary of Title IX, June 2017, co-produced by LGBT SportSafe, The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida, and the Tucker Center, was cited June 16 in the  publication Diverse: Issues in Higher Education. The article, Women of Color Remain Invisible in Leading College Athletics, discusses the ongoing issue of the lack of diversity, particularly for women of color, in coaching college sports.

“A recent study of the eight major American collegiate sports conferences revealed that 88 percent of head coaches of women’s college teams are White and 57 percent are male,” the article points out. “For the NCAA athletic directors, this number is even more dismal as there are more than 1,200 collegiate schools across the nation.”

 

 

Stoffregen interviewed on Take Care radio program in New York

School of Kinesiology professor Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., was interviewed on Take Care, a radio program on health and wellness that originates at station WRVO in Oswego, NY.  Co-hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interviewed Stoffregen about his research related to motion sickness.

The interview was broadcast on Saturday, July 15, and again on Sunday, July 16. The full interview is  on the Take Care website and on iTunes, and the preview clip is here.

Barr-Anderson quoted in Highlights Magazine online

Dr. Barr-Anderson
Dr. Barr-Anderson

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Lab, was quoted in two online magazine articles for Highlights Magazine online. Barr-Anderson’s research interests focus on physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and obesity prevention in children and adolescents, and she used her expertise to answer questions and advise parents on how to aid their children in living an active lifestyle and combat the couch-potato culture.

Barr-Anderson is cited in two articles, titled “Struggle-Free Tips to Get Your Couch-Potato Kid Moving,” and “Why’s My Kid a Couch Potato: Is he Lazy…or Something Else?“. These pieces are part of the journal’s series “Smart Answers to Parents’ Toughest Questions”, which offers insight on what keeps children from being active, and tips on how to be active together.

“You can’t underestimate the importance of going outside together to throw around a ball or start a garden,” says Barr-Anderson. “You get movement and activity, and time spent together.”

 

Moehnke noted in The Katy News as scholarship recipient

Hailee Moehnke, a graduate student in the School of Kinesiology and a recent recipient of the Edith Mueller Endowed Fund for Graduate Education in the Tucker Center scholarship, was noted in her hometown newspaper, The Katy News, of Katy, Texas.

Moehnke, who is advised by Professor Maureen R. Weiss, is pursuing her Masters of Science in Kinesiology, with an emphasis in Sport and Exercise Psychology. Her research focus is in Positive Youth Development, and she is interested in learning how participation in sport and physical activity affects youth psychological and social maturity.

The fund, administered by the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, is used to support graduate education, including for graduate assistantships, research support, travel to conferences, and equipment.

Dengel is lead author of article published in American Journal of Lifestyle

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is the lead author of an article published in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. The article, entitled “Impact of health status and lifestyle modifications on vascular structure and function in children and adolescents,” examined the effects of various lifestyle interventions (i.e., exercise, weight loss, etc.) on vascular structure and function in children and adolescents.

Konczak gives invited presentation at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

As part of a two-day visit to Budapest, Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, presented his work on robotic rehabilitation to members of the Wigner Research Centre for Physics at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and toured a new rehabilitation clinic.

His Hungarian hosts comprised researchers with backgrounds in mathematics, physics, and cognitive neuroscience with an interest in modeling human movement and translating this knowledge to help patients with spinal cord injuries to regain function. The Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Magyar Tudományos Akadémia) is the most important and prestigious academic society of Hungary. Its main responsibilities are the cultivation of science, dissemination of scientific findings, supporting research and development and representing Hungarian science domestically and around the world.

Three Kinesiology faculty give lectures on exercise and healthy aging in Chinese cities in June

School of Kinesiology professors Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., Li Li Ji, Ph.D., and Michael Wade, Ph.D.,  gave invited lectures at one international conference and three Chinese universities  from June 9 through June 15. Their talks centered broadly around a theme of exercise and healthy aging, and how age-related changes in older adults affect balance and posture.

Dr. Wade and Dr. Konczak first gave two keynote addresses at the China Preschool Children Health Conference held in Suzhou, a fast-growing modern city outside Shanghai. They then visited Shanxi University in Taiyuan, the capital city in Shanxi province in northwestern China with 4.2 million people. Next they traveled by high-speed rail to Tianjin, where they presented at Tianjin Sport University, a long-time partner of the School of Kinesiology. Their final lecture was at Hebei University in Shijiazhuan, where the first modern higher education institution in China was founded in 1895.

 

 

 

 

Wiese-Bjornstal presenting at ISSP 14th World Congress in Seville, Spain

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab (SMPL) in the School of Kinesiology, will present a paper July 13 at the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) 14th World Congress Sevilla 2017, held July 10-14 in Seville, Spain.

The paper represents Wiese-Bjornstal’s collaborative work with student authors from the U of M, including SMPL graduate students (Kristin Wood, Andrew White) and SMPL former undergraduate student (Amanda Wambach), as well as 2016 U of M visiting Fulbright scholar Professor Victor Rubio from the University of Autonoma, Madrid.

The paper being presented is:  Wiese-Bjornstal, D. M., Wood, K. N., White, A. C., Wambach, A. J., & Rubio, V. J. (accepted for 2017, July). Exploring religiosity and spirituality in coping with sport injuries. In V. J. Rubio (Chair), Coping, resilience and personal growth following a sport injury.

Gao delivers keynote at 2017 China-America Summit Forum on Breast Cancer

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL), gave a keynote address at the 2017 China-America Summit Forum on Breast Cancer in Guangzhou, a major city of over 20 million in southern China, on June 18th, 2017. He delivered a 30-minute,  well-received presentation titled “Disease Management and Improvement of Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Survivors” to over 200 conference attendees.

Stoffregen article in PLOS ONE is among most cited

An article by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) in the School of Kinesiology, is among the 10% most-cited articles published in PLOS ONE.

The article, “Getting Your Sea Legs,”  was published in 2013. It has been viewed 6,901 times and cited 30 times as of June 2017.

 

 

Konczak and Wade give invited talks at child health development conference in China

Kinesiology professors Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., and Michael Wade, Ph.D.,  addressed over 700 attendees of the Suzhou International Conference on Child Health Development. The conference centered around themes of how early childhood education best promotes cognitive, social, sensory and motor development. Suzhou is a city of about 10.5 million people in southeastern China. Kinesiology professor Li Li Ji, Ph.D., also attended the conference.
Dr. Wade
Dr. Ji and Dr. Konczak

Dengel named editor of International Journal of Sports Medicine

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology in the School of Kinesiology, has been named editor for the International Journal of Sports Medicine. The journal publishes peer-reviewed scientific research on physiology and biochemistry, immunology, nutrition, training and testing, orthopedics and clinical science, and behavioral science. The International Journal of Sports Medicine publishes key research results from top centers around the world.

StarTribune features Stoffregen and his research in article on virtual reality and motion sickness

Since 1990, Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, has studied motion sickness and virtual reality (VR), sometimes called “simulator sickness.” One of his interests is  examining the effects of VR and VR applications, which can cause people to become spatially disoriented and physically ill.

In a June 30 article titled  “What’s the future of virtual reality? Minnesota researchers may hold the answer,” the StarTribune discusses Stoffregen’s research and the way VR technology deals with motion sickness – or not.

“Why would anyone pay $600 for something that makes you toss your cookies?” Stoffregen asks in the article. He argues that companies who sell VR games are not dealing with changing the designs of the games, but are simply changing their liability rules should consumers become ill.

The article discusses Stoffregen’s research extensively, as well as studies being conducted by the Mayo Clinic, which may provide answers to the problems with nausea and sickness related to VR and VR applications across a broad spectrum.

Stoffregen gives invited talk at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

On June 30, Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), gave an invited talk at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA, titled “Getting your sea legs: The horizon, seasickness, and adaptive human movement.” His presentation was cited in an article in the Cape Cod Times on July 2.

WHOI was the terminus of Stoffregen’s latest research cruise from Costa Rica to Woods Hole. He and student lab members spent 16 days at sea conducting a number of experiments.

Lewis is co-investigator on NIH/National Institute of Nursing grant

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology director and professor, is a co-investigator on an NIH/National Institute of Nursing grant (R01 NR016705-01), “Community-based intervention effects of older adults’ physical activity and falls.” The purpose of this study is to identify behavioral change strategies that lead to increased physical activity and in turn lead to a reduction in falls and improved quality of life (QOL) among older adults. She will be working with PI Siobhan McMahon and other co-investigators to refine and consult on the intervention implementation and physical activity assessment. The grant will run through January, 2022.

Lewis served as a faculty mentor for Dr. McMahon’s KL2 Scholars Career Development Program for assistant professors conducting clinical or translational research.

 

 

Barr-Anderson appears on “Public Health Minute with Dr. William Latimer”

Daheia J Barr-AndersonDahiea Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory in the School of Kinesiology, appeared on the Public Health Minute with Dr. William Latimer, presented by the School of Health Sciences, Human Services, and Nursing at Lehman College, CUNY, Bronx, NY, on a segment titled “Physical Activity and Healthy Eating“.

The Public Health Minute is a one-minute audio segment in which the creator and host, Dr. William Latimer, interviews researchers and medical professionals about a wide variety of public health topics and is designed to get practical health advice informed by cutting- edge research to the public.

LaVoi quoted on reasons for bias in hiring women soccer coaches

In the past, high school and college women’s soccer teams were coached overwhelmingly  by women. After Title IX was passed in 1972 and women’s sports began attaining greater support and prestige, more men became interested in coaching women’s sports teams. Their numbers grew dramatically while women coaches’ numbers declined.  Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, was quoted in an online article in SBNation, “Soccer’s ugly sexism is keeping women from coaching the beautiful game,” on reasons for the bias in hiring. Lavoi gave a presentation on women coaches in soccer at the 2017 NSCAA convention last January.