Category Archives: PASS Lab

Mary Jo Kane interviewed on MPR for the 45th anniversary of Title IX

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, will be interviewed by Minnesota Public Radio host Tom Weber on Thursday, June 22, at 11:00 a.m. on 91.1 FM.

Kane will be discussing the 45th anniversary of the passage of Title IX, the social and cultural impact of the law, progress made in the last four decades, and areas of improvement still needed in the world of women’s sports.

Listen to the interview from June 22, 2017: 45 years of Title IX: what’s changed?

Lewis’s research cited in Reuters feature on benefits of exercise on postpartum depression

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology with a research focus on behavioral aspects of physical activity, was recently cited in a story published by Reuters.  The Health News feature, titled “Exercise may stave off postpartum depression,” discussed an article recently published by researchers from Spain and Chile. Their findings align with Lewis’s research outcome that regular, low-intensity exercise has a positive effect on postpartum depression.

The study authors didn’t draw conclusions or provide recommendations about the type or length of exercise that would be most beneficial, but suggested that future studies should include more data about the types of physical activity programs that could reduce depression.

Lewis and her colleagues currently are conducting a randomized trial that analyzes home-based exercise and home-based wellness programs among 450 mothers with a history of depression. In another study, they’re analyzing exercise programs among low-income women at risk for postpartum depression.

“Exercise is often the first thing that gets crossed off the list when there’s a new baby,” Lewis said in the article. “It’s important to take care of yourself through exercise to keep that wellbeing high.”

The story also appeared on the English language media outlet, Channel NewsAsia, based in Singapore.

 

 

 

Weiss and legacy of students present research at NASPSPA

image of Dr. Maureen Weiss and her students at NASPSPA 2017Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and 12 graduate students spanning 30 years and three institutions, presented research studies and convened for an “academic family dinner” at the annual meeting of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA) in San Diego held on June 3-7, 2017.

The photo shows Weiss with former and current students at the University of Oregon, University of Virginia, and University of Minnesota. Students from the University of Minnesota include Alison Phillips (Ph.D., 2015) and Lindsay Kipp (Ph.D., 2012) in the front row, and Nicole Bolter (Ph.D., 2010), Hailee Moehnke (current M.S. student), and Sarah Espinoza (current Ph.D. student) in the back row. Weiss was president of NASPSPA in 2005-2006 and just completed a 5-year term on the Executive Committee as Past-President’s Liaison.

Lavoi interviewed on Way of Champions podcast

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is featured in a Way of Champions podcast, in which she discusses a variety of issues, including women in sport leadership, women in coaching, kids’ participation in sports, “background anger,” and the connection between winning at sports and character development. Listen here.

Barr-Anderson, students present at ACSM

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., and students traveled to the American College of Sport Medicine’s Annual Meeting in Denver, CO held May 30-June 3 to give several presentations. Barr-Anderson is an assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology in behavioral aspects of physical activity.

Tutorial: Hot Fitness Trends to Promote Health and Physical Activity in Minority Communities – Yoga. Daheia Barr-Anderson

Oral Presentation: Exploring the link between exercise identity and intervention dosage: I-FIT (Initiating Feelings of Individual Transformation). Eydie Kramer, Kinesiology doctoral student; Daheia Barr-Anderson

Poster Presentation: Vertical jump test as a health-promotion screening tool for predicting bone strength in young adults. Maggie King, Kinesiology doctoral student; Steven Levy, Lucas Carr, and Kathleen Janz, Iowa State University

Kramer is recipient of inaugural Drinkwalter Fellowship for Nutrition Research

images of Eydie KramerThe inaugural fellowship for the Roger W. and Ann T. Drinkwalter Fellowship for Nutrition Research has been awarded to Eydie Kramer, a School of Kinesiology doctoral student in Behavioral Aspects of Physical Activity under the guidance of Dr. Daheia Barr-Anderson, assistant professor. The Drinkwalter Fellowship was established in 2016 through a generous endowment from Mrs. Ann T. Drinkwalter as a continuing legacy to her husband Roger’s and her mutual, lifelong interest and professional dedication to food- and nutrition-related fields. The fellowship supports graduate students in CEHD’s School of Kinesiology who are pursuing research in nutrition as an important context for critical factors related to health and well-being.

Two new books out this week in the “Expanding Literacies in Education” series edited by C&I’s Cynthia Lewis

Two new books in Routledge’s Expanding Literacies in Education series, co-edited by Professor Cynthia Lewis in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, were released this week—Reading Students’ Lives by Catherine Compton-Lilly, Literacy and Mobility by Brice Nordquist.

The Expanding Literacies in Education series features books that highlight the changing landscape and explore new directions and theoretical tools in literacy studies as it is transforming education—including material, embodied, affective, and global emphases; digital and virtual worlds; and transcultural and cosmopolitan spaces. These books engage researchers, graduate students, and teacher educators with new and emerging theoretical approaches to literacy practices in all of their complexities, challenges, and possibilities.

Reading Students’ Lives: Literacy Learning Across Time documents literacy practices as children move through school, with a focus on issues of schooling, identity construction and how students and their parents make sense of students’ lives across time. It is the final book in a series of four that track a group of low-income African American students and their parents across a decade. This is a free-standing volume that breaks new ground both theoretically and methodologically and has important implications for children, schools, and educational research.

Literacy and Mobility: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Agency at the Nexus of High School and College follows students from different tracks of high school English in a “failing” U.S. public school through their first two years after high school. The work illustrates how students help constitute and connect one scene of literacy with others in their daily lives; how their mobile literacies produce, maintain, and disrupt social relations and identities with respect to race, gender, class, language, and nationality; and how they draw upon multiple literacies and linguistic resources to accommodate, resist, and transform dominant discourses.

Lewis’s research draws on critical sociocultural theory to study the relationship between classroom discourse, social identities, and learning in English/Language Arts. She holds the Emma Birkmaier Professorship in Educational Leadership and serves as the Department Chair.

Learn more about Literacy Education programs and research in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

Dahia Barr-Anderson and Sanaz Khosravani receive 2017 Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle awards

Dr. Barr-Anderson
Ms. Khosravani

A faculty member and doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology have been selected to receive awards from the College of Education and Human Development’s Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle (WPLC).

Dahia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School, has received the Rising Star Faculty Award of $1,500 to use for professional development.  She joins an elite group of CEHD female faculty members in the college who have received this prestigious award.

Sanaz Khosravani, a Kinesiology doctoral student in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, will receive a $1,400 Graduate Student Ph.D. award based on the review committee’s assessment of her “academic achievements, community involvement, leadership, and passion for her academic and professional career.”

The awards will be conferred at the WPLC’s annual celebration on Tuesday, June 13, at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul.

Thul’s research quoted in Deadspin article “The Full-Court Pressure of the Somali-American Sportswoman”

The latest posting of online publication Deadspin includes an article, “The Full-Court Pressure of the Somali-American Sportswoman,” which explores the challenges Somali women face in participating in sports and physical activity through the lens of the Somali-American community in Minneapolis.  The research of School of Kinesiology lecturer Chelsey Thul, Ph.D., is discussed extensively, and Thul; Cawo Abdi, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology at the U of M; Sarah Hopkins, head coach of U of M women’s cross country; and Muna Mohamed, Kinesiology master’s student and research assistant, are quoted.

Lewis promoted to full professor

The Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota has approved the promotion of the School of Kinesiology‘s director designate Beth Lewis, Ph.D., to the rank of full professor. A ceremony was held at the MacNamara Alumni Center to honor Dr. Lewis and others who were promoted.

Dr. Lewis’ research focuses on examining the efficacy of nonface-to-face behavioral interventions for physical activity promotion among sedentary adults. Recent studies are examining the effect of exercise on preventing postpartum depression.

Congratulations, Professor Lewis!

Weiss publishes in The Sage Encyclopedia of Out-of- School Learning

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, published an article, “Positive youth development through sport” in the just-released anthology by Sage on after-school and out-of- school programs related to teaching methods and learning styles. The two-volume series covering over 200 articles documents what the best research has revealed about out-of- school learning—what facilitates or hampers it; where it takes place most effectively; how we can encourage it to develop talents and strengthen communities; and why it matters.

Tucker Center’s “Media Coverage and Female Athletes” video rebroadcast

Media Coverage and Female Athletes
Media Coverage & Female Athletes

The Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to announce several new airings of the video in May of 2017 of its groundbreaking video, “Media Coverage and Female Athletes.”

tpt MN Channel 2.2
Friday, May 12, 2017 at 5:00 AM
Friday, May 12, 2017 at 11:00 PM

The video builds on a research-based examination of the amount and type of coverage given to female athletes with commentary from expert scholars and award winning coaches and athletes who discuss this timely issue from a variety of perspectives as they help dispel the common—but untrue—myths that “sex sells” women’s sport, and no one is interested in it anyway. Effective strategies for increasing media coverage and creating images which reflect the reality of women’s sports participation and why this is so important are also discussed.

To view the entire program online now, click here. For more information on upcoming broadcasts, click here.

Lewis and colleagues publish in Women’s Health

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues (including her advisees Lauren Billing, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate,  and Katie Schuver, Kinesiology Ph.D., 2014 ) have had an article published in Women’s Health.

The article is titled “The relationship between employment status and depression symptomatology among women at risk for postpartum depression.”

Tucker Center research cited in article on Meyer case at Iowa

The Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report research series is cited in a Cedar Rapids Gazette article, “After Jane Meyer verdict, UI orders review of employment practices.” Meyer, a former senior Associate Athletics Director, had filed a gender and sexual orientation case against the University.

WomenTalkingFootball blog features Tucker Center’s LaVoi

Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., is featured in a Women Talking Football podcast talking about women in coaching, the Tucker Center and the Women Coaches Symposium, media portrayals of female athletes, among other issues.

Weiss to give keynote presentation at Sport Psychology Conference in Switzerland

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, will give the keynote lecture at the Annual Congress of the German Society of Sport Psychology in Bern, Switzerland, on May 25.

The title of her talk is, “Positive youth development through sport and physical activity: Progress, puzzles, and promise.” The Society represents the interests of the sport psychology community inside and outside universities in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria, and its purpose is to promote and develop research, teaching, and applied fields of performance, expertise, and health. In addition to her keynote lecture, Weiss will give a presentation as part of a symposium on Youth Sport titled, “Evaluating impact of physical activity-based positive youth development programs: A tale of two exemplars.”

350-strong attend Tucker Center Women Coaches Symposium event

Coach Jill Ellis with the TC’s Nicole M. LaVoi

The Tucker Center‘s 4th Annual, 2017 Women Coaches Symposium (WCS) co-hosted by The Alliance of Women Coaches and Gopher Athletics welcomed 350+ female coaches tothe DQ Room at the TCF Bank Stadium last Friday. Jill Ellis, US Women’s National Soccer Team Head Coach, keynoted the event, with presentations by 23 other standouts in coaching and sport science research. The WCS, brainchild of Tucker Center Co-director Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., is the largest professional development, networking, and community building opportunity for women coaches at all levels and all sports in the country. The goal of the WCS is to recruit and retain women in coaching, as female athletes need and deserve same-sex role models.

Red & Black article cites Tucker Center and LaVoi’s research

The Tucker Center  and co-director and Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., are cited in a Red & Black online article, “Female head women’s basketball coaches in NCAA on the decline.” The article cites several sources in noting the decline but ends with an optimistic quote from Dr. LaVoi.

Barr-Anderson will present at Diversity Through the Disciplines Symposium 2017

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, will presenting at the Diversity Through the Disciplines Symposium 2017 this Thursday, April 27, from 11:30 am – 3:00 pm in 100 Murphy Hall. The Symposium, hosted by The Institute for Diversity, Equity, and Advocacy, invites presenters who are past Multicultural Research Award Recipients.

Barr-Anderson will be speaking at 2:20 p.m. on her research, “A Mixed Methods Assessment of Family Influence on Weight-Related Behaviors Among African-Americans.”

LaVoi quoted in Harvard Crimson

Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., is quoted in a Harvard Crimson article, “In Harvard’s Athletics Department, A Stark Wage Gap.” The article critically reviews Harvard athletic coach salaries.