Category Archives: PASS Lab

LaVoi quoted on women coaches in collegiate sports in Online Athens

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, was quoted in an article in Online Athens discussing the South Carolina women’s basketball team, coached by Dawn Staley, which won this year’s national championship. “Female coaches are underrepresented in the power five,” she commented.  “That number has been very stagnant over the last 12 years.”

LaVoi went on to describe the challenges women coaches face in a field dominated by men in the Southeastern Conference and elsewhere.  Read the full article here.

 

 

LaVoi quoted in article on female coaches for The Atlantic

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, was quoted in an online article in The Atlantic, “The Field Where Men Still Call the Shots,” on the reasoning behind the lack of female coaches in youth sports making lasting impressions on boys and girls.

The article discusses the decline of female coaches in both collegiate and youth sports, and how their absence affects youth that are involved. LaVoi is specifically quoted about research that has found that girls who are coached by men were less likely to pursue coaching careers than those led by women, saying, “When you only see men in positions of power, you conclude ‘sports are not for me.'” LaVoi organized and was a speaker at the 2017 Women Coaches Symposium.

 

 

Wiese-Bjornstal shares research in video interview with Halmstad University, Sweden

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab (SMPL) in the School of Kinesiology, attended and presented at the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) 14th World Congress Sevilla 2017, held July 10-14 in Seville, Spain. While attending the conference, Dr. Wiese-Bjornstal was interviewed by Sweden’s Halmstad University for a series of research chats.

In the interview, Wiese-Bjornstal discusses her SMPL research on religiosity and spirituality in coping with sport injuries.

Barr-Anderson is lead author on article in Journal of Adolescent Health

Dahiea Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory, is lead Daheia J Barr-Andersonauthor on an article published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. “The Modifying Effects of Race/Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Status on the Change in Physical Activity From Elementary to Middle School” examines whether the association between the change in individual, interpersonal, and environmental factors and the change in physical activity is modified by race/ethnicity or SES.

 

 

Tucker Center Title IX anniversary report cited in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

The recent study, Gender, Race & LGBT Inclusion of Head Coaches of Women’s Teams: A Report on Select NCAA Division I Conferences for the 45th Anniversary of Title IX, June 2017, co-produced by LGBT SportSafe, The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida, and the Tucker Center, was cited June 16 in the  publication Diverse: Issues in Higher Education. The article, Women of Color Remain Invisible in Leading College Athletics, discusses the ongoing issue of the lack of diversity, particularly for women of color, in coaching college sports.

“A recent study of the eight major American collegiate sports conferences revealed that 88 percent of head coaches of women’s college teams are White and 57 percent are male,” the article points out. “For the NCAA athletic directors, this number is even more dismal as there are more than 1,200 collegiate schools across the nation.”

 

 

Barr-Anderson quoted in Highlights Magazine online

Dr. Barr-Anderson
Dr. Barr-Anderson

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Lab, was quoted in two online magazine articles for Highlights Magazine online. Barr-Anderson’s research interests focus on physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and obesity prevention in children and adolescents, and she used her expertise to answer questions and advise parents on how to aid their children in living an active lifestyle and combat the couch-potato culture.

Barr-Anderson is cited in two articles, titled “Struggle-Free Tips to Get Your Couch-Potato Kid Moving,” and “Why’s My Kid a Couch Potato: Is he Lazy…or Something Else?“. These pieces are part of the journal’s series “Smart Answers to Parents’ Toughest Questions”, which offers insight on what keeps children from being active, and tips on how to be active together.

“You can’t underestimate the importance of going outside together to throw around a ball or start a garden,” says Barr-Anderson. “You get movement and activity, and time spent together.”

 

Wiese-Bjornstal presenting at ISSP 14th World Congress in Seville, Spain

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab (SMPL) in the School of Kinesiology, will present a paper July 13 at the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) 14th World Congress Sevilla 2017, held July 10-14 in Seville, Spain.

The paper represents Wiese-Bjornstal’s collaborative work with student authors from the U of M, including SMPL graduate students (Kristin Wood, Andrew White) and SMPL former undergraduate student (Amanda Wambach), as well as 2016 U of M visiting Fulbright scholar Professor Victor Rubio from the University of Autonoma, Madrid.

The paper being presented is:  Wiese-Bjornstal, D. M., Wood, K. N., White, A. C., Wambach, A. J., & Rubio, V. J. (accepted for 2017, July). Exploring religiosity and spirituality in coping with sport injuries. In V. J. Rubio (Chair), Coping, resilience and personal growth following a sport injury.

Lewis is co-investigator on NIH/National Institute of Nursing grant

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology director and professor, is a co-investigator on an NIH/National Institute of Nursing grant (R01 NR016705-01), “Community-based intervention effects of older adults’ physical activity and falls.” The purpose of this study is to identify behavioral change strategies that lead to increased physical activity and in turn lead to a reduction in falls and improved quality of life (QOL) among older adults. She will be working with PI Siobhan McMahon and other co-investigators to refine and consult on the intervention implementation and physical activity assessment. The grant will run through January, 2022.

Lewis served as a faculty mentor for Dr. McMahon’s KL2 Scholars Career Development Program for assistant professors conducting clinical or translational research.

 

 

Barr-Anderson appears on “Public Health Minute with Dr. William Latimer”

Daheia J Barr-AndersonDahiea Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory in the School of Kinesiology, appeared on the Public Health Minute with Dr. William Latimer, presented by the School of Health Sciences, Human Services, and Nursing at Lehman College, CUNY, Bronx, NY, on a segment titled “Physical Activity and Healthy Eating“.

The Public Health Minute is a one-minute audio segment in which the creator and host, Dr. William Latimer, interviews researchers and medical professionals about a wide variety of public health topics and is designed to get practical health advice informed by cutting- edge research to the public.

LaVoi quoted on reasons for bias in hiring women soccer coaches

In the past, high school and college women’s soccer teams were coached overwhelmingly  by women. After Title IX was passed in 1972 and women’s sports began attaining greater support and prestige, more men became interested in coaching women’s sports teams. Their numbers grew dramatically while women coaches’ numbers declined.  Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, was quoted in an online article in SBNation, “Soccer’s ugly sexism is keeping women from coaching the beautiful game,” on reasons for the bias in hiring. Lavoi gave a presentation on women coaches in soccer at the 2017 NSCAA convention last January.

 

Kane quoted in Newsday article comparing women athletes to male athletes

Dr. Mary Jo KaneA June 27 article in Newsday ,“Female athletes don’t have to beat men to be the best in their sport”, discusses tennis star John McEnroe comparing world-class talent Serena Williams with male players. He called her the greatest woman to play tennis, “but if she had to just play… the men’s circuit that would be an entirely different story.”

In the article, Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology professor and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, weighs in on the prevalence of comparing women athletes to male counterparts. “The broad issue is why can’t great female athletes simply be great without the constant comparison to men?” she says in the article. ““When North Carolina wins the NCAA Tournament, people don’t demand they go beat Cleveland or the Golden State Warriors. In boxing, you don’t ask the middleweight champion to beat the heavyweight.” When we compare men to women, she says, “it takes away from their greatness. They aren’t allowed to be great on their own.”

Tucker Center report cited in ESPN online

image of report coverIn an online article, “Study: Majority of women’s college coaches are white, male,” ESPN.com cited the Tucker Center’s  new report, “Gender, Race & LGBT Inclusion of Head Coaches of Women’s Team.” The article provides a summary look at the numbers from the report, produced in honor of the 45th anniversary of Title IX and in partnership with LGBT SportSafe and The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida.

Tucker Center releases report honoring 45th anniversary of Title IX

image of report coverThe Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport has released a report, “Gender, Race & LGBT Inclusion of Head Coaches of Women’s Teams: A Report on Select NCAA Division I Conferences for the 45th Anniversary of Title IX,” in honor of the 45th anniversary of Title IX. This special report is a partnership among LGBT SportSafe, The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida, and the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport at the University of Minnesota.

Race and gender data for head coaches of women’s teams were collected for eight select NCAA Division I conferences including: American Athletic Conference (AAC), Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), Big 12, Big East, Big Ten, the Ivy League, Pacific-12 (Pac-12), and Southeastern Conference (SEC). The conferences selected for this study were chosen to include the “Power 5” (ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12, SEC). Conferences were assigned a grade for race, a separate grade for gender, and recognition was included for LGBT inclusion practices at the institutional and conference level.

See also:

Mary Jo Kane interviewed on MPR for the 45th anniversary of Title IX

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, will be interviewed by Minnesota Public Radio host Tom Weber on Thursday, June 22, at 11:00 a.m. on 91.1 FM.

Kane will be discussing the 45th anniversary of the passage of Title IX, the social and cultural impact of the law, progress made in the last four decades, and areas of improvement still needed in the world of women’s sports.

Listen to the interview from June 22, 2017: 45 years of Title IX: what’s changed?

Lewis’s research cited in Reuters feature on benefits of exercise on postpartum depression

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology with a research focus on behavioral aspects of physical activity, was recently cited in a story published by Reuters.  The Health News feature, titled “Exercise may stave off postpartum depression,” discussed an article recently published by researchers from Spain and Chile. Their findings align with Lewis’s research outcome that regular, low-intensity exercise has a positive effect on postpartum depression.

The study authors didn’t draw conclusions or provide recommendations about the type or length of exercise that would be most beneficial, but suggested that future studies should include more data about the types of physical activity programs that could reduce depression.

Lewis and her colleagues currently are conducting a randomized trial that analyzes home-based exercise and home-based wellness programs among 450 mothers with a history of depression. In another study, they’re analyzing exercise programs among low-income women at risk for postpartum depression.

“Exercise is often the first thing that gets crossed off the list when there’s a new baby,” Lewis said in the article. “It’s important to take care of yourself through exercise to keep that wellbeing high.”

The story also appeared on the English language media outlet, Channel NewsAsia, based in Singapore.

 

 

 

Weiss and legacy of students present research at NASPSPA

image of Dr. Maureen Weiss and her students at NASPSPA 2017Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and 12 graduate students spanning 30 years and three institutions, presented research studies and convened for an “academic family dinner” at the annual meeting of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA) in San Diego held on June 3-7, 2017.

The photo shows Weiss with former and current students at the University of Oregon, University of Virginia, and University of Minnesota. Students from the University of Minnesota include Alison Phillips (Ph.D., 2015) and Lindsay Kipp (Ph.D., 2012) in the front row, and Nicole Bolter (Ph.D., 2010), Hailee Moehnke (current M.S. student), and Sarah Espinoza (current Ph.D. student) in the back row. Weiss was president of NASPSPA in 2005-2006 and just completed a 5-year term on the Executive Committee as Past-President’s Liaison.

Lavoi interviewed on Way of Champions podcast

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is featured in a Way of Champions podcast, in which she discusses a variety of issues, including women in sport leadership, women in coaching, kids’ participation in sports, “background anger,” and the connection between winning at sports and character development. Listen here.

Barr-Anderson, students present at ACSM

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., and students traveled to the American College of Sport Medicine’s Annual Meeting in Denver, CO held May 30-June 3 to give several presentations. Barr-Anderson is an assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology in behavioral aspects of physical activity.

Tutorial: Hot Fitness Trends to Promote Health and Physical Activity in Minority Communities – Yoga. Daheia Barr-Anderson

Oral Presentation: Exploring the link between exercise identity and intervention dosage: I-FIT (Initiating Feelings of Individual Transformation). Eydie Kramer, Kinesiology doctoral student; Daheia Barr-Anderson

Poster Presentation: Vertical jump test as a health-promotion screening tool for predicting bone strength in young adults. Maggie King, Kinesiology doctoral student; Steven Levy, Lucas Carr, and Kathleen Janz, Iowa State University

Kramer is recipient of inaugural Drinkwalter Fellowship for Nutrition Research

images of Eydie KramerThe inaugural fellowship for the Roger W. and Ann T. Drinkwalter Fellowship for Nutrition Research has been awarded to Eydie Kramer, a School of Kinesiology doctoral student in Behavioral Aspects of Physical Activity under the guidance of Dr. Daheia Barr-Anderson, assistant professor. The Drinkwalter Fellowship was established in 2016 through a generous endowment from Mrs. Ann T. Drinkwalter as a continuing legacy to her husband Roger’s and her mutual, lifelong interest and professional dedication to food- and nutrition-related fields. The fellowship supports graduate students in CEHD’s School of Kinesiology who are pursuing research in nutrition as an important context for critical factors related to health and well-being.

Two new books out this week in the “Expanding Literacies in Education” series edited by C&I’s Cynthia Lewis

Two new books in Routledge’s Expanding Literacies in Education series, co-edited by Professor Cynthia Lewis in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, were released this week—Reading Students’ Lives by Catherine Compton-Lilly, Literacy and Mobility by Brice Nordquist.

The Expanding Literacies in Education series features books that highlight the changing landscape and explore new directions and theoretical tools in literacy studies as it is transforming education—including material, embodied, affective, and global emphases; digital and virtual worlds; and transcultural and cosmopolitan spaces. These books engage researchers, graduate students, and teacher educators with new and emerging theoretical approaches to literacy practices in all of their complexities, challenges, and possibilities.

Reading Students’ Lives: Literacy Learning Across Time documents literacy practices as children move through school, with a focus on issues of schooling, identity construction and how students and their parents make sense of students’ lives across time. It is the final book in a series of four that track a group of low-income African American students and their parents across a decade. This is a free-standing volume that breaks new ground both theoretically and methodologically and has important implications for children, schools, and educational research.

Literacy and Mobility: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Agency at the Nexus of High School and College follows students from different tracks of high school English in a “failing” U.S. public school through their first two years after high school. The work illustrates how students help constitute and connect one scene of literacy with others in their daily lives; how their mobile literacies produce, maintain, and disrupt social relations and identities with respect to race, gender, class, language, and nationality; and how they draw upon multiple literacies and linguistic resources to accommodate, resist, and transform dominant discourses.

Lewis’s research draws on critical sociocultural theory to study the relationship between classroom discourse, social identities, and learning in English/Language Arts. She holds the Emma Birkmaier Professorship in Educational Leadership and serves as the Department Chair.

Learn more about Literacy Education programs and research in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.