Category Archives: MNYSRC

LaVoi gives public lecture at Arizona State

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageNicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., faculty in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, will be doing a public lecture at Arizona State University on March 14. Her talk is entitled, “The Paradox of Women in Strong Leadership,” and addresses gender discrimination, unfair double standards, and both explicit and unconscious gender bias in the hiring process.

Arizona Sonora News cites LaVoi, coaches research series

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageThe Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport research report series, Women Coaches Research Series & Report Card, and the author, Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., faculty in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, are cited in an Arizona Sonora News article, “Women continue to be neglected in NCAA Division I athletics,” featuring Erika Barnes, University of Arizona Interim Athletic Director.

MN Spokesman-Recorder cites LaVoi’s longitudinal research

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageNicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., faculty in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, is quoted in “Men still coach majority of women’s collegiate teams,” a Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder article by Charles Hallman. The article interviews LaVoi, citing data in her extensive, longitudinal research on coaching trends, most recently the fifth in the Women Coaches Research Series & Report Card.

MomEnough podcast interviews LaVoi on sport parent behavior

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageNicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., faculty in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, was interviewed in podcast for a Mom Enough website article, “Being a Good Sport Parent: Practical Guidance on Bringing Out the Best in Your Young Athlete.” LaVoi is cited for doing work to improve “positive attitudes and behavior to support children’s development as athletes and people of character.”

Minnesota Girls & Women in Sports Day is Wednesday!

National Girls & Women in Sport Day logoThe Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to celebrate the 31st Annual National Girls and Women in Sports Day (NGWSD) on Wednesday, February 1. NGWSD is the premiere occasion to celebrate the participation, success, and accomplishments of girls and women athletes. As part of the celebration the Tucker Center is screening “The Founders,” a film about the “13 women who together battled society, prejudice, and preconception to create a lasting, global sporting legacy in golf.”  Members of the Tucker Team will be at the Minnesota History Museum to help honor one of those extraordinary women, Patty Berg, who will receive a Minnesota Legacy Award at the annual Minnesota Girls & Women in Sport Day.

Kinesiology’s Tucker Center releases annual Women in College Coaching Report and Report Card

Tucker Center annual report cardThe Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport at the University of Minnesota’s School of Kinesiology, in collaboration with the Alliance of Women Coaches, is releasing today the fourth annual Women in College Coaching Report and Report Card, coinciding with National Girls & Women in Sport Day on February 3, 2016. 

In the more than 40 years since the passage of Title IX, female sport participation is at an all-time high, but the percentage of women coaching women at the collegiate level has declined from over 90 percent in 1974 to a nearly all-time low today of 40 percent, a number that appears to have leveled off in the last decade. This annual report card was created to increase awareness of the issue while helping increase the percentage of women in the coaching profession, and to start a national dialogue, says Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, co-director of the Tucker Center. The report assigns letter grades A -F to institutions based on the percentage of women head coaches of women’s teams, providing a visible mechanism of accountability at the institutional level.

To read the full report, visit http://www.TuckerCenter.org.  espnW provides additional coverage of the report launch online.

LaVoi to receive Special Merit Award from Minnesota Coalition of Women in Athletic Leadership

Nicole M. LaVoi, 2013 photoDr. Nicole M. LaVoi, faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, has been chosen by the Minnesota Coalition of Women in Athletic Leadership to receive their 2015 Special Merit Award given annually to individuals who exemplify extraordinary levels of commitment to breaking barriers for girls and women in sport. The award will be presented at the Minnesota National Girls and Women in Sports Day celebration, held at the Minnesota History Center, Wednesday, February 4, 2015, at 12 p.m.

LaVoi quoted on the precedents set by UMD Miller firing

Nicole M. LaVoi, 2013 photoDr. Nicole M. LaVoi, faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, comments in a Minnesota Public Radio web article, “Female hockey coach firing was about more than money,” on the precedents set by the recent firing of University of Minnesota, Duluth’s hockey coach Shannon Miller.

InsideHigherEd.com quotes LaVoi on career of UM Duluth hockey’s Shannon Miller

Nicole M. LaVoi, 2013 photoDr. Nicole M. LaVoi, faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, is quoted in an InsideHigherEd.com piece, “Salary Ceiling for Women Only?” on the University of Minnesota—Duluth’s hockey coach Shannon Miller’s non-renewal of contract. LaVoi notes she has never seen the lack-of-funds rationale, given by Duluth, in her years of researching female coaches.

Strib quotes LaVoi in article on female coaches in girls’ hockey

Nicole M. LaVoi, 2013 photoDr. Nicole M. LaVoi, faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, is quoted in the Minneapolis Star Tribune article, “Female coaches in girls’ hockey still scarce, doubted.” LaVoi comments on the perception of female vs male coaches.

LaVoi quoted in St Louis Post-Dispatch on 12-year-old’s letter to Dick’s Sporting Goods

Nicole M. LaVoi, 2013 photoDr. Nicole M. LaVoi, faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, is quoted in the St Louis Post-Dispatch article “Sporting-goods Industry Ignores One of its Biggest-growing Markets” on 12-year-old McKenna Peterson’s letter to Dick’s Sporting Goods about the absence of women in their catalog.

LaVoi quoted in The Gazette on differing treatment of female and male coaches

Nicole M. LaVoi, 2013 photoDr. Nicole M. LaVoi, faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, is quoted in the Cedar Rapids, IA The Gazette article, “Are there differences between coaching men and women?” about a University of Iowa field hockey coach firing, and the consequences of different expectations for male and female coaches.

LaVoi invited to contribute to New York Times’ “Room for Debate”

Nicole M. LaVoi, 2013 photoDr. Nicole M. LaVoi, faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, has been invited to contribute to the New York Times “Room for Debate” opinion collection, “Who Needs Football?” LaVoi’s contribution, “Now Women Are Seeing Benefits,” addresses and emphasizes the benefits of sport participation.

LaVoi writes invited piece for Minnesota Hockey newsletter

nmlavoi-2013Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, teaching faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, has written an article, “Should Boys and Girls be Coached Differently?,” appearing in the Minnesota Youth Hockey Newsletter. The column addresses the question, how does coaching females differ from coaching males.

LaVoi on expert panel at Notre Dame coaching ethics symposium

nmlavoi-2013On April 25, Play Like a Champion Today, the world’s only university-based initiative focused on promoting a positive sports culture for all young people, is hosting a symposium entitled “Coaching Ethics: Creating a Value Centered Athletic Community in Higher Education.” Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, teaching faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, is a featured speaker at the symposium in a group of experts from sports ethics, higher education, professional ethics, as well as coaches, administrators and faculty. Topics include the coaching culture of collegiate athletics, the ethical principles that should inform coaching practice, and a plan to create values-centered athletic communities through sport.

LaVoi attends DC conference on safety in youth sport

LaVoiN-2010Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, teaching faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, is attending the Protecting Athletes and Sports Safety (PASS) National Conference on Youth Sports Safety in Washington, DC [watch live]. The focus of the conference is on concussion and youth sport culture. PASS was launched by the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine and the Department of Global Health at George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services to address and combat the incidence of catastrophic brain injuries among youth who participate in organized sports.

LaVoi featured in New York Times discussion on children’s athletics

LaVoiN-2010Joining five other experts, Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, teaching faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, speaks out in a New York Times “Room for Debate” piece, “Can Playing Ball Be Bad for Children?” LaVoi addresses opportunities for girls in athletics in the context of some parents’ “winning at all costs” attitude.

LaVoi describes parents’ role in youth sport on ice skating website

LaVoi-Nicole-2010 Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, teaching faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, explains what sport can afford youth in “Be a Winning Parent: 3 Tips for Parents of Young Athletes,” a piece that appeared on Riedell skates’ blog. LaVoi states that youth sports should be a place where young people have fun, socialize, develop, and strive for success. Further, she notes that adults have a large role and need to be conscious of their actions.

Ivanhoe Broadcast Television features LaVoi in Fall 2013 “Smart Woman” segment

LaVoi-Nicole-2010This fall, Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, teaching faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, will appear in a television show produced by Ivanhoe Broadcast News, a syndicated television news-gathering organization. The segment is based on the 2007 Tucker Center Research Report, “Developing Physically Active Girls: An Evidence-based Multidisciplinary Approach,” and appears as part of Ivanhoe’s “Smart Woman” syndicated series. Ivanhoe provides TV stations with news segments offering viewers health solutions with the latest breakthroughs in science and medicine, tips on staying healthy, and advice from women for women. Ivanhoe reaches 11 of the top 20 television markets including Rochester, La Crosse, and Eau Claire (though not the Twin Cities) reaching an audience of 80 million households.

LaVoi in two AAHPERD research symposia

LaVoi-Nicole-2010 Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, teaching faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, is part of two research-based symposia at the annual American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) Conference in Charlotte, NC:

  • “Conducting Research on Female Athletes: Strategies for Success,” is a session organized by the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS). The purpose of this session is to provide a multi-disciplinary overview of research related to female athletes and share strategies for conducting research with female athletes.
  • LaVoi and Tucker Center Affiliated Scholar Dr. Cindra S. Kamphoff, Minnesota State University-Mankato, will present their national database findings, “Females in Positions of Power Within U.S. High School Sports.” This session is part of the Research Consortium Grant Findings.