Category Archives: Movement Science

Konczak gives invited presentation at European workshop

On October 10, Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, presented a lecture on robotic rehabilitation to the PACE network community in Genova, Italy.

PACE stands for Perception and Action in Complex Environments. The network is funded by the European Union and seeks to train predoctoral students with a background in engineering, mathematics, neuroscience, and psychology.

 

Mahnan featured in Global Programs and Strategy Alliance’s “Global U”

Arash Mahnan, Kinesiology Ph.D. student and IT Fellow, is one of three people featured in the Global Programs and Strategy Alliance online newsletter, Global U, promoting Driven: The University of Minnesota Campaign, the first system-wide fundraising campaign at the U of M in more than a decade. The Alliance has set a goal of raising $7 million to “Drive a Global U.”

Mahnan discusses his goal to fill the gap between engineering and clinical research, and the imperative to attract top students and faculty from around the world to come to the University of Minnesota. He is a student in the area of biomechanics and neural control and is advised by Juergen Konczak, Ph.D.

Read Mahnan’s feature here.

 

 

Stoffregen gives invited talk at National Academy of Kinesiology meeting

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), gave an invited talk at the 87th annual meeting of the National Academy of Kinesiology in Washington, DC, on September 16. His presentation was titled “Ecological physics and the perceptual information for motor control.

 

Konczak lab receives NSF I-corps award

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, is the PI on a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) I-Corps program.

This program prepares scientists and engineers to extend their focus beyond the university laboratory and to accelerate basic-research projects that are ready to move toward commercialization. The aim of this grant is to move forward the lab’s robotic rehabilitation technology that is jointly developed with partners in Italy and Singapore. As part of this grant, a team consisting of postdoctoral researcher Naveen Elangovan (entrepreneurial lead), Jürgen Konczak and Pat Tarnowski as a business adviser is formed. Pat is a trained PT with an MBA and is currently the Senior Director of Clinical Health Solutions at BCBS of Minnesota. The team will work closely with NSF staff and advisers to explore and understand the U.S. market.

Kinesiology doctoral student Arash Mahnan appointed to U’s Senate Information Technologies Committee

Arash Mahnan, Kinesiology Ph.D. student in Movement Science, has been appointed to the University’s Senate Information Technologies Committee (SITC). The committee represents the institution’s faculty, academic professional, civil service and student interests in the development, implementation, and distribution of information technologies at the U. The committee reports to the Senate and makes recommendations concerning policies and administration around information technologies.

The committee meets monthly and consists of eight faculty, four P&A, three students, and one civil service representative. The students include Mahnan, a representative from the Department of Engineering and one from the College of Continuing Education. The student representatives were chosen based on their background, experience and qualifications in the field of information technology. Mahnan will serve a two-year term on the committee.

Konczak presents at International Conference of Robotic Rehabilitation in London

 Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, gave an invited presentation at a workshop at the 15th International Conference of Robotic Rehabilitation (ICORR) at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London, UK. The conference was a part of the London Rehab Week, where around a thousand attendees discussed the newest trends in neurorehabilitation. Konczak presented an overview on the current state of how robotic medical devices can be used to diagnose sensory and motor deficits of neurological diseases.

 

 

Stoffregen interviewed on Take Care radio program in New York

School of Kinesiology professor Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., was interviewed on Take Care, a radio program on health and wellness that originates at station WRVO in Oswego, NY.  Co-hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interviewed Stoffregen about his research related to motion sickness.

The interview was broadcast on Saturday, July 15, and again on Sunday, July 16. The full interview is  on the Take Care website and on iTunes, and the preview clip is here.

Konczak gives invited presentation at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

As part of a two-day visit to Budapest, Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, presented his work on robotic rehabilitation to members of the Wigner Research Centre for Physics at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and toured a new rehabilitation clinic.

His Hungarian hosts comprised researchers with backgrounds in mathematics, physics, and cognitive neuroscience with an interest in modeling human movement and translating this knowledge to help patients with spinal cord injuries to regain function. The Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Magyar Tudományos Akadémia) is the most important and prestigious academic society of Hungary. Its main responsibilities are the cultivation of science, dissemination of scientific findings, supporting research and development and representing Hungarian science domestically and around the world.

Three Kinesiology faculty give lectures on exercise and healthy aging in Chinese cities in June

School of Kinesiology professors Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., Li Li Ji, Ph.D., and Michael Wade, Ph.D.,  gave invited lectures at one international conference and three Chinese universities  from June 9 through June 15. Their talks centered broadly around a theme of exercise and healthy aging, and how age-related changes in older adults affect balance and posture.

Dr. Wade and Dr. Konczak first gave two keynote addresses at the China Preschool Children Health Conference held in Suzhou, a fast-growing modern city outside Shanghai. They then visited Shanxi University in Taiyuan, the capital city in Shanxi province in northwestern China with 4.2 million people. Next they traveled by high-speed rail to Tianjin, where they presented at Tianjin Sport University, a long-time partner of the School of Kinesiology. Their final lecture was at Hebei University in Shijiazhuan, where the first modern higher education institution in China was founded in 1895.

 

 

 

 

Stoffregen article in PLOS ONE is among most cited

An article by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) in the School of Kinesiology, is among the 10% most-cited articles published in PLOS ONE.

The article, “Getting Your Sea Legs,”  was published in 2013. It has been viewed 6,901 times and cited 30 times as of June 2017.

 

 

Konczak and Wade give invited talks at child health development conference in China

Kinesiology professors Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., and Michael Wade, Ph.D.,  addressed over 700 attendees of the Suzhou International Conference on Child Health Development. The conference centered around themes of how early childhood education best promotes cognitive, social, sensory and motor development. Suzhou is a city of about 10.5 million people in southeastern China. Kinesiology professor Li Li Ji, Ph.D., also attended the conference.
Dr. Wade
Dr. Ji and Dr. Konczak

StarTribune features Stoffregen and his research in article on virtual reality and motion sickness

Since 1990, Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, has studied motion sickness and virtual reality (VR), sometimes called “simulator sickness.” One of his interests is  examining the effects of VR and VR applications, which can cause people to become spatially disoriented and physically ill.

In a June 30 article titled  “What’s the future of virtual reality? Minnesota researchers may hold the answer,” the StarTribune discusses Stoffregen’s research and the way VR technology deals with motion sickness – or not.

“Why would anyone pay $600 for something that makes you toss your cookies?” Stoffregen asks in the article. He argues that companies who sell VR games are not dealing with changing the designs of the games, but are simply changing their liability rules should consumers become ill.

The article discusses Stoffregen’s research extensively, as well as studies being conducted by the Mayo Clinic, which may provide answers to the problems with nausea and sickness related to VR and VR applications across a broad spectrum.

Stoffregen gives invited talk at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

On June 30, Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), gave an invited talk at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA, titled “Getting your sea legs: The horizon, seasickness, and adaptive human movement.” His presentation was cited in an article in the Cape Cod Times on July 2.

WHOI was the terminus of Stoffregen’s latest research cruise from Costa Rica to Woods Hole. He and student lab members spent 16 days at sea conducting a number of experiments.

Smith’s research presented at 12th International Conference on Occupational Stress and Health

Thomas J. Smith, Ph.D., adjunct lecturer for the School of Kinesiology, is first author on a paper presented at the recently concluded 12th International Conference on Occupational Stress and Health, “Work, Stress and Health 2017: Contemporary Challenges and Opportunities,” that convened in Minneapolis June 7-10. The paper is titled, ‘The Productivity Paradox – A Distracted Working Hypothesis.’ The paper also will be published in the conference proceedings.

Dahia Barr-Anderson and Sanaz Khosravani receive 2017 Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle awards

Dr. Barr-Anderson
Ms. Khosravani

A faculty member and doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology have been selected to receive awards from the College of Education and Human Development’s Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle (WPLC).

Dahia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School, has received the Rising Star Faculty Award of $1,500 to use for professional development.  She joins an elite group of CEHD female faculty members in the college who have received this prestigious award.

Sanaz Khosravani, a Kinesiology doctoral student in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, will receive a $1,400 Graduate Student Ph.D. award based on the review committee’s assessment of her “academic achievements, community involvement, leadership, and passion for her academic and professional career.”

The awards will be conferred at the WPLC’s annual celebration on Tuesday, June 13, at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul.

Konczak gives invited presentation at Neural Control of Movement meeting in Dublin

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, spoke to an audience of about 150 international neuroscientists at the 27th annual meeting of the Society for Neural Control of Movement in Dublin, Ireland.

Konczak provided an overview of his lab’s research on somatosensory deficits in Parkinson’s disease and dystonia and outlined how these sensory impairments may cause the motor deficits seen in the neurological diseases. He also presented recent work led by Dr. Naveen Elangovan, postdoctoral researcher in the lab, that showed that Parkinsonian symptoms can be improved through a specialized sensory training.

Kinesiology’s Nicolette Peterson and Anna Solfest present at 2017 UROP Symposium

Nicolette Peterson and Anna Solfest, both undergraduate students in the School of Kinesiology, participated in today’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) at the U of M.

Peterson, mentored in the UROP program by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor of movement science and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), presented her research, “The Effect of Feedback on Postural Sway and the Result of Possible Motion Sickness.” Solfest, mentored by Don Dengel, Ph.D., professor of exercise science and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), presented her research, “Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density of Division I Collegiate Male and Female Basketball Athletes.”

Nicolette Peterson
Anna Solfest

Stoffregen presents twice at Interdisciplinary Symposium

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, is one of two featured speakers at the 9th Annual Interdisciplinary Symposium of the Postural Restoration Institute in Lincoln, NE, April 20 and 21, 2017.

The titles of Dr. Stoffregen’s keynotes are “Motion Sickness and Human Movement” and “Getting Your Sea Legs.”

Kinesiology Ph.D. student Chris Curry accepts summer graduate research internship at Mayo Clinic

Christopher Curry, School of Kinesiology Ph.D. student and member of APAL, has accepted a summer position as a graduate research intern in the Physical Ergonomics/Human Factors research department at the Mayo Clinic. At Mayo, Chris will be part of a team working to improve medical device ergonomics, teamwork, health care ergonomics and lean health care systems. Chris’s Ph.D. adviser is Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D.

Stoffregen discusses motion sickness research in To See the Sea

An online publication for the cruising set, To See the Sea, features an interview with Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and researcher on motion sickness. Stoffregen discusses his fascination as a boy in the 1960s with astronauts and space travel, including the phenomenon of motion sickness (which afflicts many astronauts in space), and how it led him to the research he is doing today.

The podcast and written transcript are available at tps://toseethesea.com/index.php/interviews/.