Category Archives: Kinesiology

MN Spokesman-Recorder cites LaVoi’s longitudinal research

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageNicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., faculty in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, is quoted in “Men still coach majority of women’s collegiate teams,” a Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder article by Charles Hallman. The article interviews LaVoi, citing data in her extensive, longitudinal research on coaching trends, most recently the fifth in the Women Coaches Research Series & Report Card.

Wade to give talk at University of Georgia

On February 17, 2017, Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, will speak at the College of Education, University of Georgia, as part of their Research Colloquium Series.

In his talk, “Does theorizing about Developmental Coordination Disorder inform diagnosis and intervention?”, Dr. Wade will comment on the empirical data and conclusions as to the possible cause of developmental coordination disorder. He argues that the data for an information theory explanation is not compelling, and a reconsideration of developmental coordination disorder from a dynamical systems perspective is perhaps more promising.

Minnesota Legislative Office on the Economic Status of Women quotes Tucker Center’s Mary Jo Kane

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in the Women’s Sports & the Media and Legislative Update Newsletter from the Minnesota Legislative Office on the Economic Status of Women. In an analysis of the Minneapolis Star Tribune’s sports section’s percentage of men’s  vs. women’s article, Kane’s comments help interpret the data regarding media coverage.

Stoffregen appointed to Gait & Posture board

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has accepted an appointment to the editorial board for Gait & Posture, one of the pre-eminent journals in the field of Movement Science. The journal is a vehicle for the publication of up-to-date basic and clinical research on all aspects of locomotion and balance.

Gait & Posture has a 1-year Impact Factor of 2.286, and a 5-Year Impact Factor of 2.864.

MomEnough podcast interviews LaVoi on sport parent behavior

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageNicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., faculty in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, was interviewed in podcast for a Mom Enough website article, “Being a Good Sport Parent: Practical Guidance on Bringing Out the Best in Your Young Athlete.” LaVoi is cited for doing work to improve “positive attitudes and behavior to support children’s development as athletes and people of character.”

Family Social Science launches new M.A. in prevention science

Family Social Science (FSOS) has launched a new master’s degree program in prevention science that will help prepare family science practitioners to prevent or moderate major human dysfunctions before they occur.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Prevention Science will equip students to confront many of the daunting challenges facing today’s families and communities, including trauma and drug addiction. The M.A. in Prevention Science will also help students develop strategies to promote the health and well-being of families.

Core coursework for the M.A. in Prevention Science gives students a solid foundation in statistics and research methodology, family conceptual frameworks, and ethics. Students can choose the Plan A which includes a thesis, or the Plan B which includes a project and a paper.

The M.A. in Prevention Science is intended for individuals who would like to build a career that supports families and works to redirect maladaptive behaviors.

The program is currently accepting applications for Fall 2017. The application deadline is March 1, 2017.

Moore and Inoue presenting research results to Minnetonka Senior Services

image of Yuhei Inoue
Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D.
Chris Moore, Ph.D. candidate

Graduate assistant Chris Moore, advised by Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology presented research results to study participants at the Minnetonka Senior Services.

This research study titled “The Influence of Sport Team Identification on Mental Health for Older Adults” was funded by Janet B. Parks NASSM Research Grant. For this study, Moore and Inoue worked with Minnetonka Senior Services to recruit older adults and coordinated trips to three home games of University of Minnesota Women’s volleyball team. The purpose of the project was to examine if attending sporting events and establishing a sense of connections with the sport team and its fans may help enhance older adults’ social relationships and well-being.

Kihl and collegeaues serve as guest editors for special issue on corruption in sport

KihllL-prefLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues James Skinner, MBA, Ph.D. (Loughborough University-London) and Terry Engelberg-Moston, Ph.D. (James Cook University-Australia) served as guest editors for the Special Issue – Corruption in sport: Understanding the complexity of corruption in European Sport Management Quarterly.

In addition, to serving as guest editors, Kihl and colleagues wrote an introductory piece emphasizing how the special issue increases our understanding of the complexity and multidimensional nature of sport corruption through examining integrity and different causes of match fixing.

The entire piece can be read online: “Corruption in sport: Understanding the complexity of corruption“.

Wiese-Bjornstal will present at Florida State University’s SPEAR conference

Wiese-BjornstalD-2015On February 9, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab,  will be the keynote speaker at  Florida State University’s Sport Professionals’ Experience and Research (SPEAR) conference hosted by the student-led graduate organization, Sport Psychology Organization & Research Team (SPORT). Dr. Wiese-Bjornstal will be giving two invited lectures about evidence-based research and evidence-based practice in sports medicine psychology.

Wiese-Bjornstal, alumna Russell, publish in SAGE Research Methods

Wiese-Bjornstal
Russell

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and Ph.D. alumna Hayley Russell, ’14, have published a research methods case study in SAGE Research Methods Cases. Russell is an assistant professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN. The case is titled “A Narrative Approach to Understanding Psychological Stories of Overuse Injuries Among Long-Distance Runners,” and it investigates the experiences of athletes with overuse injuries, specifically long-distance runners, by means of a narrative methodology.

Read the full study here.

 

Stoffregen to publish in Ecological Psychology

StoffregenT_2015A study by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), along with Bruno Mantel and Benoit G. Bardy, has been accepted for publication in Ecological Psychology. The article is titled “The senses considered as one perceptual system.”

While peer-reviewed, the article was invited as part of a special issue commemorating the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems, by James J. Gibson, one of the foundational statements of the Ecological Approach to Perception and Action.

Dr. Mantel is on the faculty at the University of Caen, while Dr. Bardy is on the faculty at the University of Montpellier, both in France.

InsideHigherEd cites just-released Tucker Center Women Coaches Report

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageAn article appearing on the InsideHigherEd online site, “Report: Hiring of Women’s Coaches Stagnates,” features a Tucker Center newly released report, “Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Select NCAA Division-I Institutions, 2016-17.” The report, one of several in the fifth year of the series, is authored by Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology faculty Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. The InsideHigherEd piece focuses on both the lack of decline but also the continued underrepresentation of women coaches of women’s sports in the collegiate arena.

Inoue and partners featured in The Japan Times

image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology together with his partners from Temple University and the University of Tsukuba in Japan are featured in The Japan Times, Japan’s largest English-language newspaper.

The article discusses the project to reform Japanese college sports by establishing an athletic department that is modeled after US intercollegiate athletic departments. In the next two years, Dr. Inoue and his partners will study the first implementation of this structure at the University of Tsukuba.

Read the entire article titled “Researchers urge Japan to reform college sports system”.

LaVoi, Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report Card featured on espnW

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageThe Tucker Center‘s “Women Coaches Research Series & Report Card,” authored by co-director and School of Kinesiology faculty Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, is featured in an online espnW article, “Tucker Center report: Number of women college coaches still not making the grade.” The report is quoted multiple times within the article, discussing the impact women coaches have on the diversity and culture of sports.

Tucker Center announces 2016-17 NCAA Division I Women Coaches Report

Women coaches Report, NCAA DI 2016-17 cover with two women high-fiving over a golf bagIn honor of the February 1 National Girls and Women in Sports Day, the Tucker Center, in collaboration with the Alliance of Women Coaches, is proud to announce the release of “Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Select NCAA Division-I Institutions, 2016-17,” the latest in the Women Coaches Research Series and Report Card. Forty plus years after the passage of Title IX, female sport participation is at an all-time high but the percentage of women coaching women at the collegiate level is stagnant and near an all-time low of ~40% today.

To read the full report, discover the many ways the report is making a difference, and learn about interesting trends (including insight into which of the 86 select “big time” NCAA Division-I institutions, sports and conferences receive passing and failing grades), view the report here.

Gao and Lee publish paper in Computers in Human Behavior


Zan Gao, Ph.D
.
, associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and Director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab, recently published a paper in Computers in Human Behavior. The first author, Jung Eun Lee, is Dr. Gao’s Ph.D. student and currently an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

The paper examined the acute effect of playing a single bout of active video games on children’s mood change and whether mood change differed by gender and age group. The researchers found that a short bout of active video games significantly reduced anger, depression and vigor, and fourth grade children had greater vigor than the third graders.

Lee, J., Xiang, P., & Gao, Z. (2017). Acute effect of active video games on older children’s mood change. Computers in Human Behavior, 70, 97-103. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.12.060 (impact factor: 2.69)

Minnesota Girls & Women in Sports Day is Wednesday!

National Girls & Women in Sport Day logoThe Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to celebrate the 31st Annual National Girls and Women in Sports Day (NGWSD) on Wednesday, February 1. NGWSD is the premiere occasion to celebrate the participation, success, and accomplishments of girls and women athletes. As part of the celebration the Tucker Center is screening “The Founders,” a film about the “13 women who together battled society, prejudice, and preconception to create a lasting, global sporting legacy in golf.”  Members of the Tucker Team will be at the Minnesota History Museum to help honor one of those extraordinary women, Patty Berg, who will receive a Minnesota Legacy Award at the annual Minnesota Girls & Women in Sport Day.

Lakeland Ledger quotes LaVoi on difficulty finding women coaches

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageNicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., faculty in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, is quoted in the Lakeland Ledger article, “Local colleges say it’s difficult finding female coaches.” LaVoi says the overarching reason “has to do with systemic bias in college athletics.”

Inoue to publish in Journal of Business Research

A research paper by Yuhei Inoue,  Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Business Research.The study, titled “Predicting behavioral loyalty through corporate social responsibility: The mediating role of involvement and commitment“, examined whether consumers’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities can predict behavioral loyalty, and how attitudinal constructs mediate this relationship. A field study of 634 customers of an Australian professional football team was conducted by combining attitudinal surveys with actual behavioral data collected one year later. The study’s findings indicate that the contribution of CSR initiatives to behavioral loyalty is not as robust as past research suggests, and is contingent upon specific psychological states activated by consumers’ perceptions of such initiatives.

Citation of this article: Inoue, Y., Funk, D.C., & McDonald, H. (in press). Predicting behavioral loyalty through corporate social responsibility: The mediating role of involvement and commitment. Journal of Business Research.

Konczak publishes in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

Konczak-2012Together with colleagues from Italy and Singapore, Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Lab,  published a paper that presents a new method to measure proprioception in children. Francesca Marini, a doctoral student at the Italian Institute of Technology, is the first author of the article, “Robot-aided developmental assessment of wrist proprioception in children.

Neurodevelopmental disorders and brain injuries in children have been associated with proprioceptive dysfunctions that will negatively affect their movements. Unfortunately, the knowledge of how proprioception evolves in typically developing children is still sparse due to the lack of reliable clinical examination protocols.