Category Archives: Kinesiology

New York Times cites Tucker Center Women Coaches Report data

In reviewing the status of women in college coaching the New York Times article, “Number of Women Coaching in College Has Plummeted in Title IX Era,” cites the Tucker Center’s most recent Women in College Coaching Series report, “Head coaches of women’s collegiate teams: A report on select NCAA Division-I institutions, 2016-17.”

Kihl appointed to USA Dance Ethics Committee

KihllL-prefAssociate professor Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, was appointed to the national sport federation USA Dance Ethics Committee. The Ethics Committee was recently created and oversees implementation of and compliance with the organization’s Code of Ethics. Dr. Kihl is one of four committee appointments who will serve a two-year term.

Weiss and Former Students Receive Outstanding Research Writing Award

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues and former students Nicole Bolter (PhD, 2010, UMN) and Lindsay Kipp (PhD, 2012, UMN), are recipients of the Outstanding Research Writing Award for their article published in Volume 87 of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES). The Research Council of the Society for Health and Physical Education (SHAPE) recognized the authors at their annual meeting on March 16. This award identifies one article in each yearly volume of RQES that characterizes an outstanding contribution of scholarship and writing quality from among all manuscripts published that year. This is the seventh time that Weiss has personally been recognized with this scholarly writing award.

Dr. Weiss (left), Dr. Bolter (center), and Dr. Kipp (right)

The full citation is, Weiss, M. R., Bolter, N. D., & Kipp, L. E. (2016). Evaluation of The First Tee in Promoting Positive Youth Development: Group Comparisons and Longitudinal Trends. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 87, 271-283.

Here is a brief abstract: Purpose: This manuscript represents the third in a series documenting our longitudinal evaluation of The First Tee, a physical activity-based youth development program that uses golf as a vehicle for teaching life skills and enhancing developmental outcomes. Previous phases of our project: (a) established initial data-based evidence of effectiveness through cross-sectional and qualitative methods (Weiss et al., 2013), and (b) provided validity and reliability for a measure of life skills transfer in three studies using mixed methods (Weiss et al., 2014). The purpose of the present phase was to: (a) compare youth in The First Tee to youth in other activities on life skills transfer and developmental outcomes, and (b) examine change and stability over three years in life skills transfer among youth in The First Tee. Method: In Study 1, youth participating in The First Tee (N = 405) and a comparison group (N = 159) completed measures of key constructs. In Study 2, a longitudinal sample of 192 youth participating in The First Tee completed the life skills transfer measure for three consecutive years. Results: Study 1 revealed that youth in The First Tee compared favorably to youth in other activities on 5 of 8 life skills and 6 of 8 developmental outcomes, and Study 2 showed that scores improved or remained stable for life skills transfer over time. Conclusion: Results from both studies show that The First Tee is effective in teaching for transfer of life skills and promoting developmental outcomes.

April 7 rebroadcasts of Tucker Center “Concussions and Female Athletes” video

The Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to announce several rebroadcasts this April of its groundbreaking video, “Concussions and Female Athletes.”

tptMN Statewide Digital MN Channel
Fri 7 April @ 2:00 am
Fri 7 April @ 8:00 pm

Through the personal stories and experiences of coaches, athletes and their families, as well as in-depth interviews with nationally recognized scholars and medical experts, this documentary examines the causes underlying concussion and offers practical solutions to help prevent and treat sports-related concussion injuries in female athletes.

To view the entire program online now, click here. For more information on upcoming broadcasts, click here.

KARE11 video interview with Tucker Center’s Nicole LaVoi on USA Hockey boycott

Tucker Center co-director and Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., was interviewed in a KARE-11 video piece, “The Team USA Women’s Hockey boycott is winning for a few reasons” in which Dr. LaVoi spoke to the various reasons the boycott has been successful.

Kinesiology alumna receives funding from National Institute on Aging

Azizah Jor’dan, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology alumna (Ph.D., 2012), McNair Scholar, and current Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard Medical School recently received funding for her NIA K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Career Development project, entitled “Vascular mechanisms and tDCS treatment of gait and posture in aging and age-related disease.”

The NIA K99/R00 is a career development award presented by the National Institute on Aging as an early career mechanism for postdoctoral fellows to facilitate career advancement.

While at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Jor’dan was advised by Michael Wade, Ph.D. She has published with Dr. Wade and Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D.

New York Times quotes Tucker Center’s Mary Jo Kane on women’s hockey deal

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in a New York Times article, “U.S. Women’s Team Strikes a Deal With U.S.A. Hockey,” noting the deal to be “an iconic moment in women’s sports.”

Kinesiology’s Madeleine Orr and Morgan Betker awarded wins at CEHD’s Three Minute Thesis competition

image of Morgan Betker and Madelleine Orr, winners at the CEHD 2017 Three Minute Thesis contest
Betker, left, and Orr at 3MT competition

Madeleine Orr and Morgan Betker, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidates and finalists in CEHD’s Research Day Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, won prizes in the Finalist Competition held today, March 28, at the McNamara Alumni Center.

Orr (sport management emphasis, advised by Dr. Yuhei Inoue) was awarded the $500 first prize for her presentation, “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” Betker (exercise physiology emphasis, advised by Dr. Eric Snyder) won the $250 People’s Choice award for her presentation, “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers.

The six finalists from five departments across the college had exactly 3 minutes to explain their research projects in an engaging and easy-to-understand format to a packed room in McNamara.

“Telling a compelling story about your research and its implications in less than 3 minutes is way harder than I thought it was going to be!” said Orr after the event. “But to represent Kinesiology with Morgan, and come away with such great results, was a great experience.”

Betker says, “As researchers, we don’t often get the opportunity to share our passion with people outside of our niche, nor hear others’ perspectives in their chosen emphasis. This competition was an excellent way to not only challenge ourselves and grow professionally, but to broaden our perspectives and find value in the work of fellow graduate students in other fields. I’m very grateful to have been a part of the experience.”

3MT is a worldwide competition that was introduced by the University of Queensland in 2008. This is the second year the college has held the event as part of CEHD Research Day. Judges for today’s event were Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.


LaVoi is guest speaker at Haverford Group’s spring meeting

Tucker Center co-director and Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., was a guest speaker at this year’s Haverford Group spring meeting held March 25-27 at Macalester College in St. Paul.

LaVoi spoke on the topic, “Women in Coaching and Team Culture.”

The Haverford Group was created in the mid-1980s to bring together an influential group of academic institutions concerned with the positive influence, thinking and direction of NCAA Division III athletics. Members include Amherst College, Austin College, Bridgewater College, Bryn Mawr College, Centre College, Clark University, DePauw University, Grinnell College, Haverford College, Lewis & Clark College, Macalester College, Occidental College, Pomona-Pitzer College, Skidmore College, Smith College, Swarthmore College, Washington & Lee University, Wellesley College, Wesleyan University, Whitman College and The College of Wooster.

 

 

 

Tianou Zhang, Kinesiology PhD candidate, to present at U’s Doctoral Research Showcase April 11

The University’s tenth annual Doctoral Research Showcase will include a presentation by Tianou Zhang, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate and advisee of Li Li Ji, Ph.D., director of the School of Kinesiology.

The Showcase will be held Tuesday, April 11 from 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. in the Great Hall, Coffman Memorial Union.

The goal of the Doctoral Research Showcase is to help doctoral fellows develop their abilities to talk about their research to audiences outside of their disciplines and to gain exposure for their work with key stakeholders.

Mr. Zhang’s research presentation is “Dietary Antioxidant Protection Against Inflammation in Exercise and Obesity.” All Kinesiology colleagues are invited to attend and support Mr. Zhang.

For more information about the event or to view a list of all of this year’s participants, visit: z.umn.edu/drs2017.

Ruth Rath, Kinesiology PhD student, and Wade to publish in EBioMedicine

Ruth Rath, Ph.D. student in Kinesiology,  and Michael Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, have written an article on posture and aging to be published in EBioMedicine, a journal that specializes in publishing research and commentary on translational medicine.

The title of the article is, “The two faces of postural control in older adults: Stability and Function.”

Wade is a research scientist in Kinesiology’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) and Rath is a graduate assistant and graduate student researcher in the lab. She is advised by Wade and Kinesiology professor Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D.

LaVoi, Hamilton manuscript accepted to Journal of Moral Education

Nicole LaVoi, 2013Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and Tucker Center co-director in the School of Kinesiology, and former Tucker Center RA and Kinesiology graduate Dr. Maya Hamilton, have a manuscript accepted for publication in the Journal of Moral Education titled, “Coaches Who Care: The Ethical Professional Identity Development of Moral Exemplar Collegiate Coaches.” This paper is part of Hamilton’s dissertation.

Crain’s Detroit Business article quotes Tucker Center’s Kane

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Tucker Center for Research in Girls & Women in Sport, is quoted in a Crain’s Detroit Business article, “Women in the front office: There aren’t many, and that’s bad for business.” Kane notes that “gender equity efforts in professional sports have been a mixed bag.”

Kihl and colleague to publish in Business & Society Review

KihllL-prefAssociate professor Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, and her colleague, Dr. Kathy Babiak (University of Michigan) have had their paper titled, “A blueprint for CSR engagement: Identifying stakeholder expectations and attitudes of a community relations program,” accepted for publication in Business & Society Review. The paper examines sport stakeholders’ expectations regarding corporations’ CSR initiatives through dialogue. Kihl and Babiak argue that stakeholder dialogue is an important way for a business to gain perceptions about how it is viewed and evaluated by its stakeholders and underlies subsequent interactions.

Stoffregen featured in latest Science News cover story

The cover story of the March 18 issue of Science News includes the latest research being conducted by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL). Stoffregen is quoted extensively on his work related to virtual reality, motion sickness, and the sex connection.

 

LaVoi to serve on panel at event at Villanova University

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and Tucker Center co-director in the School of Kinesiology, will be at Villanova University on March 24, 2017, to serve as a panelist for the event,“The Grace of Playing: A Conversation on Sports and Their Role in Human Flourishing.”

Kane to moderate session at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study conference

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Tucker Center for Research in Girls & Women in Sport, will be moderating the session, “Gender, Media, and Popular Culture,” at the conference “Game Changers: Sports, Gender, and Society” to be held April 6-7 at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Award-winning book on sport management theory features chapters by Inoue, Kane, and Kihl

Three School of Kinesiology faculty contributed chapters to an award-winning book on sport management theory.

Routledge Handbook of Theory in Sport Management was selected as an Outstanding Academic Title 2016 by CHOICE magazine, published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., and Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., each wrote chapters. This is the first book to trace the intellectual contours of theory in sport management, and to explain, critique and celebrate the importance of sport management theory in academic research, teaching and learning, and in the development of professional practice.

Inoue and Kihl contributed to the Managerial Theories section with their chapters, “Developing a Theory of Suffering and Academic Corruption in Sport” (Kihl) and “Applying Strategic CSR in Sport” (Inoue). Kane contributed the chapter “The Continuum Theory: Challenging Traditional Conceptualization and Practices of Sport” in the section Sociocultural Theories. Dr. Kane is director of the School of Kinesiology’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, and Dr. Kihl is an affiliated scholar in the Tucker Center.

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Kim will publish in Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport

Young Ho Kim, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has had a paper accepted for publication in the Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport. The paper, entitled “The Normalization of Sport Corruption and Interdependence of the Factors: Symbiosis of Threefolding’s Organism,” examines 1) how sport corruption is normalized in certain sport organizations and societies, and 2) how sport corruption, through the process of normalization, is produced and reproduced in their organic system. Young is advised by Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., and Rayla Allison, JD.

HSCL colleagues’ article listed as one of most influential papers of 2016 by Veterinary Clinics: Equine Practice

The journal Veterinary Clinics: Equine Practice has published a summary of the most influential papers in equine medicine for 2016. One of these is by Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL) colleagues in collaboration with a group of equine veterinarians from the University of Minnesota/Michigan State University. The paper is entitled “The Equine Movement Disorder “Shivers” Is Associated with Selective Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Axonal Degeneration.”

Valberg SJ, Lewis SS, Shivers JL, Barnes NE, Konczak J, Draper AC, Armién AG. Vet Pathol. 2015 Nov;52(6):1087-98. doi: 10.1177/0300985815571668