Category Archives: Physical Activity & Health

Gao is co-investigator on NIH grant to study physical activity in older adults

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory in the School of Kinesiology, recently collaborated with researchers from the U of M and successfully secured a 5-year NIH R21/33 research grant as a co-investigator. The project titled “Mindful Movement for Physical Activity and Wellbeing in Older Adults: A Community Based Randomized Hybrid Effectiveness-Implementation Study” (1R21AT009110-01A1) will be led by Dr. Roni Evans, Research Director of the Integrative Health & Wellbeing Research Program at the Center for Spirituality and Healing.

Physical inactivity has reached pandemic proportions and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Of particular concern is that most middle to older age adults fall far short of recommendations for health-enhancing physical activities. This project takes a novel approach to tackling this problem by combining mindfulness with behavioral strategies in a unique ‘Mindful Movement’ program offered through YMCA community facilities. Gao will serve as the physical activity assessment specialist in the team to lead the measurement of the primary outcome – older adults’ moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Lewis and colleagues publish in Women’s Health

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues (including her advisees Lauren Billing, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate,  and Katie Schuver, Kinesiology Ph.D., 2014 ) have had an article published in Women’s Health.

The article is titled “The relationship between employment status and depression symptomatology among women at risk for postpartum depression.”

Gao and students publish book on technology, physical activity, and health promotion

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, recently published a book titled “Technology in Physical Activity and Health Promotion” together with his graduate students Jung Eun Lee, Zachary PopeHaichun Sun, and Nan Zeng with Routledge publishers.

Offering a logical and clear critique of technology in physical activity and health promotion, this book will serve as an essential reference for upper-level undergraduates, postgraduate students and scholars working in public health, physical activity and health and kinesiology, and healthcare professionals.

The book is now available on the Routledge website and Amazon.com.

Lewis presents two research projects at San Diego conference

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, presented twice at the 38th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Diego, CA., in March 2017.

The research projects Dr. Lewis presented are “Feasibility and efficacy of a physical activity intervention for the prevention of postpartum depression: A randomized trial.” (Lewis, B. A., Schuver, K., Gjerdingen, D., Terrell, C., & Avery, M. ) and “The future of physical activity intervention research: Expanding focus to sedentary behavior, technology, and dissemination.” (Lewis, B.A., Napolitano, M.A., Buman, M., Williams, D.M., Nigg, C.R.).

Lewis interviewed for online article, “2017’s Best and Worst Cities for an Active Lifestyle”

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, is one of the experts interviewed for WalletHub’s online article, “2017’s Best and Worst Cities for an Active Lifestyle.” The article lists criteria used for evaluating the cities and ranks them. (Minneapolis received an overall ranking of 6 out of 100 cities.)

Dr. Lewis was one of a panel of experts who responded to questions about how people and their families can incorporate active lifestyle changes in their lives, and how to influence change at the policy level. Read the story and Dr. Lewis’s interview here.

 

Frayeh and Lewis publish in International Journal of Exercise Science

Former School of Kinesiology doctoral student Amanda Frayeh Ph.D., now assistant professor for sport studies at Lock Haven University, published a research article titled Sport Commitment Among Adult Recreational Soccer Players: Test of an Expanded Model” in the International Journal of Exercise ScienceCo-author of the article is Amanda’s former adviser Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology.

The study expanded versions of an existing research model to explore psychosocial factors related to adults’ participation in recreational team sport. The purpose is to demonstrate that sport commitment is related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Lewis receives three-year $900,000 grant from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Beth LewisBeth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, has been awarded a three-year $900,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). The grant, “Exercise Intervention for Preventing Perinatal Depression among Low-Income Women,” will examine the influence of exercise and wellness support on depression among pregnant and postpartum women.

According to MCHB publications, perinatal (the period during and after pregnancy) depression affects approximately 14 to 25 percent of pregnant women and is used to describe a range of conditions including,  prenatal depression, postpartum blues, postpartum depression, and postpartum psychosis.

Previously, Lewis was awarded a $1.46 million grant, “Effect of Exercise and Wellness Interventions on Preventing Postpartum Depression,” from the National Institute of Mental Health.  Results from this research found that higher levels of physical activity were related to fewer depressive symptoms.

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