Category Archives: Psychological Foundations of Education

Psych foundations, QME students recognized for their contributions

L-R: Yadira Peralta Torres, Jonathan Brown, Kyle Nickodem, Kelsey Will (not pictured: Nic VanMeerten and Reese Butterfuss)

On May 4, 2017, psychological foundations of education students: Reese Butterfuss, Nic VanMeerten, and Kelsey Will,  along with quantitative methods in education students: Jonathan Brown, Kyle Nickodem, and Yadira Peralta Torres were awarded for their contributions to each program at the annual Psych Foundations and QME Awards and Recognition Ceremony.

Psychological foundations of education awards:

Reese Butterfuss has been awarded the 2016-17 Research Award for the psych foundations program. He is gradually developing a research program on the role of higher-order cognition in knowledge revision, with a current focus on the role of executive functions. Since joining the graduate program in 2015, Reese has co-authored three journal papers, has one more under review, and is preparing another two for submission. He has already presented 17 papers at professional conferences and will be presenting another three later this year.

Nic VanMeerten is 2016-17 Leadership Award recipient. As a third year graduate student in the Department of Educational Psychology, Nic continually shows leadership in his efforts to better the department, university, and Twin Cities community. He is the elected student representative for the psych foundations program and is an advocate for graduate students’ perspectives and ideas. Additionally, Nic co-founded GLITCH, a non-profit organization to support game designers and individuals interested in game based learning.

Kelsey Will received the 2016-17 Teaching Award for her work on developing a new undergraduate course, EPSY 1281 – Applied Psychological Science. She taught one lab section in both fall and spring semesters this year. Kelsey introduced many creative ways to engage and motivate students while working with a team of teaching assistants and the course instructor.

Quantitative methods in education awards:

Jonathan Brown has been awarded the 2016-17 Teaching Award.  Since beginning the QME program, Jonathan has taught and developed curricular material for both the Introductory and Intermediate Statistical Methods courses for Master’s-level students. Students appreciate Jonathan’s teaching as he earns average course evaluation ratings of 5.6 or higher on a 6-point scale.  In the summer of 2016, Jonathan developed and taught a section of the Introductory Statistical Methods course for the OLPD Executive Ph.D. cohort.

For a second time, Kyle Nickodem was awarded the  Leadership Award for his leadership in the program and department.  Through his work with the Educational Equity Resource Center and the Campbell Leadership Chair, he has made important contributions to schools, school leaders, and education communities regarding data and assessment literacy. In addition, he has contributed to presentations and presented to the University of Minnesota Principals’ Academy, Generation Next, the Minnesota Assessment Group, and a number of school districts across the state.

Yadira Peralta Torres received the 2016-17 Research Award.  She has made numerous contributions to the field. Since 2016, she  published or has in press four papers, including The American Statistician and  Journal of Modern Applied Statistical Methods. Also, she has three papers under review (two of which she is first author for), is preparing two others for submission to a journal, and has presented or co-presented eight papers (three as first author) at national and regional conferences. Yadira has also developed a research program focusing on improving analyses of student growth, which is the basis of her dissertation.

 

 

Undergrads research with psych foundations faculty, present at symposium

On April 20, eight undergraduates conducting research with faculty in the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program presented their research at the 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium.

The Relationship Between Executive Functions and Science Achievement
Student: Drake Bauer
Mentor: Sashank Varma

Bauer is also a participant in the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) and is getting his minor in Applied Psychology in Educational and Community Settings (APECS). 

Influence of using technology on culturally responsive science teaching
Students: Ju Ae Kim, Juno Park
Mentor: Keisha Varma, Julie Brown (C&I)

Supporting Parental Involvement and Increasing Engagement in Science Learning through SLE Activities among Middle School Students with Diverse Cultural Backgrounds
Students: Jiyeon Lee, Wing Tung Chan
Mentors: Keisha Varma, Julie Brown (C&I)

Exploring the Use of Board Games to Support Cognitive Mechanisms Related to Science AchievementStudent: Lindsay Jerome
Mentor: Keisha Varma

Expanded Study: A Novel Extension of the Spacing Effect on Learning
Student: Kaitlin Mork
Mentor: Sashank Varma

Mork is also a participant in UROP and working toward an APECS minor.

Literature Review: Immigration Research in the Past Decade
(Not pictured)
Student: Selena Wang
Mentor: Geoffrey Maruyama

The Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual poster fair that gives all undergraduate researchers a chance to share their research, scholarly and creative projects with the University community.

Ed Psych faculty, staff, student honored with CEHD awards

On April 24, CEHD hosted the annual Spring Assembly and Recognition Ceremony to recognize members of the university for their distinguished service and leadership. This year, the Department of Educational Psychology’s Annie Hansen-Burke, Sarah Jergenson, and Nicolaas VanMeerten were award recipients.

Annie Hansen-Burke, senior lecturer and field placement coordinator in the school psychology program was recognized with the Distinguished Teaching Award. The award recognizes outstanding contributions by a college faculty member who enhances learning through classroom and/or field-based teaching, student advising, and academic innovations.

The Civil Service/Bargaining Unit Innovative Ideas Award was given to Sarah Jergenson, communications associate and content strategist for the department. The award recognizes civil service/bargaining unit employees who have made an impact in CEHD by creating, suggesting and implementing an innovative change strategy which resulted in a measurable benefit to the college.

Psychological foundations of education Ph.D. student, Nicolaas VanMeerten was awarded the Outstanding Student Leadership Graduate Award. This award recognizes undergraduate and graduate students for exceptional leadership and/or service contributions to the CEHD, the University community, and the surrounding community.

Congratulations to all of our award-winning department members!

Ed Psych research on debunking misinformation around autism featured in Connect

Panayiota Kendeou, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, Veronica Fleury, assistant professor in the special education program, and postdoctoral fellow Gregory Trevors were recently featured in a CE+HD Connect article, “Debunking Misinformation.”

The article summarizes findings from the Global Signature program and how Department of Educational Psychology researchers are working to cut through misconceptions about the causes and treatments of autism spectrum disorder.  

In the article, Fleury explains that autism was a prime topic to research because there is so much misinformation about what causes it and about the best treatments for families, schools, and communities.

“Autism tends to be a fad magnet. People use a variety of strategies that don’t have a strong research base—in fact, we have research to refute their effectiveness—yet they still have a strong hold,” says Fleury.

According to Connect in an age of misinformation and fake news, Fleury, Kendeou, and Trevors’ work has gained urgency.

“You cannot really erase and replace misconceptions that people have acquired. That’s the sad story about misinformation,” Kendeou told Connect. “We want to reduce its impact, not change people’s beliefs.”
Read the full article.

Ed Psych researchers present on misinformation surrounding ASD

Despite the facts, people across the world hold different beliefs about what causes autism spectrum disorder (ASD). On March 31, faculty and researchers from the Department of Educational Psychology shared findings from a recent “glocal” (locally based with global components) study on the misinformation that surrounds ASD.

Panayiota Kendeou, Guy Bond Chair in Reading and associate professor in the psychological foundations of education program, kicked off the event with an introduction into the cognitive theory behind “Reducing the Impact of Misinformation around ASD.” She explained the misinformation effect and her Knowledge Revision Components Framework (KrEC) which examines the incremental steps of knowledge revision.Watch Kendeou’s presentation.

Gregory Trevors, post-doctoral fellow in the psychological foundations of education program, provided additional background, presenting local and global data from the study on “The Public’s Prior Knowledge about the Causes of ASD and its Relations to Treatment Recommendation.” Watch Trevor’s presentation.

Veronica Fleury, assistant professor and ASD licensure & M.Ed. coordinator in the special education program, presented findings from the local portion of the study conducted at the Minnesota State fair, specifically examining “The Impact of (source) Credibility on Treatment Recommendations.” Watch Fleury’s presentation.

Finally, Krista Muis, associate professor in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology at McGill University, provided an outside perspective on why the Global Signature Program is important. Muis, who studies how individuals process complex, contradictory content on socio-scientific issues such as vaccinations, noted the strengths of the research project. She also posed a few questions about the local portion of study and provided recommendations for future global research on the topic. Watch Muis’ presentation.

The event ended with a discussion that will help inform the content for future coursework, including a study abroad course focused on understanding ASD with an emphasis on debunking global misinformation.

The signature program is funded by the Office of International Initiatives and Relations at the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD).

  1. Kendeou, P., & O’Brien, E. J. (2014). The Knowledge Revision Components (KReC) Framework: Processes and Mechanisms. In D. Rapp, & J. Braasch (Eds.), Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences Cambridge: MIT.

Kendeou presents at Northwestern University on debunking misinformation

Panayiota Kendeou

Panayiota (Pani) Kendeou, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Guy Bond Chair in Reading, recently presented to the Multi-disciplinary Program in Learning Sciences at Northwestern University on the “Science of Debunking Misinformation.”

In the talk, Kendeou discussed a series of studies that examine the incremental steps of knowledge revision, detailing its time course and mechanisms during reading comprehension in the context of the Knowledge Revision Components framework (KReC).1 She explained how KReC—which she developed with Professor Edward J O’Brien at the University of New Hampshire—aligns itself nicely with knowledge revision in the context of reading comprehension and has implications for research in text comprehension, conceptual change, persuasion, and the misinformation effect.

Get more information on Kendeou’s research by visiting her Reading & Language Lab.

  1. Kendeou, P., & O’Brien, E. J. (2014). The Knowledge Revision Components (KReC) Framework: Processes and Mechanisms. In D. Rapp, & J. Braasch (Eds.), Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences Cambridge: MIT.

McComas named CEHD President’s Community Engaged Scholar

Jennifer McComas with award
Jennifer McComas with the award presented to her on March 30

Jennifer McComas, associate chair and special education professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, is the CEHD nominee for this year’s President’s Community Engaged Scholar award. This award recognizes  faculty involvement in public service and encourages and emphasizes civic engagement as a permanent priority of the College of Education and Human Development.

McComas was recognized on March 30 in a University-wide ceremony hosted by the Office for Public Engagement and the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost.

“Jennifer is highly deserving of the award,” says Department of Educational Psychology chair, Geoffrey Maruyama. “She has worked over the past decade in Minneapolis Public Schools, first in North Minneapolis, then with Anishinabe Academy, and recently, she added tele-health research to connect with rural communities,” says Maruyama. “These and other projects reflect her deep commitment to engaged research and to doing work that makes a difference in people’s lives.”

Please join us in congratulating Professor McComas on this tremendous accomplishment!

VanMeerten organizes GLITCHCON track on games that make a difference

Nic VanMeerten, a doctoral student in the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, is serving on the leadership team for GLITCH CONNECT (GLITCHCON).

Taking place May 5-7, GLITCHCON is an arts and cultural festival that serves as a catalyst for digital innovation that focuses on building connections between leaders and emerging creative technologists.

VanMeerten will be organizing the “Impact” track of the conference which focuses on games that make a difference, addressing everything from education and humanitarian issues to saving the world through play. Three faculty members from the University of Minnesota are also serving on the “Impact” track committee, Keisha Varma from the Department of Educational Psychology, Svetlana Yarosh from Computer Science & Engineering and Edward Downs from the College of Liberal Arts at UMD.

For more information or to register for GLITCHCON visit www.glitchcon.mn.

Ed Psych, special education receive top rankings

Education Sciences Building
Education Sciences Building

The Department of Educational Psychology and our special education program were ranked in the top 10 of the 2018 U.S. News & World Report rankings of graduate schools. We maintained a #8 ranking in special education and moved up to #9 in educational psychology. The department is part of the University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) which ranked 12th among public professional schools of education, 21st among all schools, in the rankings.

CEHD is a world leader in developing innovative programs to address opportunity gaps in child development, teaching, and learning. Consider its outstanding partnership programs with school districts in Minnesota that apply evidence-based teaching methodologies to strengthen schools. Note also the impact of recent groundbreaking research on autism—which Jason Wolff, assistant professor in special education was a part of—has uncovered new patterns of brain development in infants. CEHD’s productivity last year included $44.3 million of externally funded research.

CEHD’s developmental psychology program (Institute of Child Development) was also ranked by U.S. News &  World Report and is #1 in the country.

“Our college continues to reach new heights of excellence in graduate teaching, research, and outreach,” said Dean Jean K. Quam. “We are focused on improving the lives of students across Minnesota, the nation, and the world.”

Learn more about Educational Psychology’s top rated masters and doctorate programs.

Rankings methodology: U.S. News surveyed 379 schools granting education doctoral degrees. It calculates rankings based on quality assessments from peer institutions and school superintendents nationwide, student selectivity, and faculty research and resources, which includes student/faculty ratio and faculty awards as well as support for research.

Psych Foundations undergraduate researchers to train with AERA

Two undergraduate students conducting research with Department of Educational Psychology faculty members in the psychological foundations of education program have been invited to participate in an Undergraduate Student Education Research Training Workshop put on by the American Educational Research Association (AERA).

  • Drake Bauer is an undergraduate student majoring in life sciences and psychology. Bauer works with two psychological foundations of education faculty members, Sashank Varma in the Cognitive Architecture Lab and Keisha Varma in the STEM Thinking, Reasoning, & Learning Lab.
  • Nikita Salovich, an undergraduate majoring in psychology, works with Panayiota Kendeou—also a faculty member in psychological foundations of education—in the Reading & Language Lab.

Bauer and Salovich will attend the AERA workshop, April 27-29 in San Antonio, Texas. This workshop, led by early career and senior scholars, will give the students an overview of how education research is designed across disciplines, how quantitative and qualitative research methods are used in studies, and how research is applied to education policy and practice. Bauer and Salovich were selected for the workshop based on their strong academic performance, research skills and experience, and potential to contribute to the education research field.

The AERA Undergraduate Student Education Research Training Workshop is part of the 2017 AERA Annual Meeting. Leading researchers and scholars provide guidance to undergraduates as they learn about research. Attendees participate in focused lectures and discussions about education research and attend some general Annual Meeting activities.

Varma, student present research on the origins of numerical abilities to Royal Society

Sashank Varma, associate professor and coordinator for the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, and doctoral student, Soo-hyun Im, recently traveled to London for the Royal Society Meeting on the Origins of Numerical Abilities, a scientific discussion about how when humans acquire numerical competence, we build upon an inherited cognitive foundation. At the meeting, Varma and Im presented their research projects entitled Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students1 and From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis.2

Co-authors of Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement include: Purav Patel, a doctoral student in psychological foundations of education and Rachel Voit, a Macalester College student at the time of data collection and now a masters student in social work.

The Royal Society is a fellowship of many of the world’s most eminent scientists and is the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.

  1.  Varma, S., Voit, R., Im, S.-h., & Patel, P. J. (2017, February). Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.
  1. Im, S.-h., & Varma, S. (2017, February). From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.

Anthony Schulzetenberg receives “Thank a Teacher” note from student

Anthony Schulzetenber

The Center for Education Innovation allows students to send thank you notes to teachers who make a positive difference on their achievement and development. Educational psychology Ph.D. student and teaching assistant, Anthony Schulzetenber is already making a difference in his students’ lives, and received a “thank you” note from one of them in an official letter from the Center of Education Innovation. The note reads:

“Thank you, Anthony for your help and patience during the semester! You went through very important stuff covered in lectures with us and explained everything with great examples in our lab. You are the best TA I have ever had. I feel really lucky to be in your lab section. Thanks a lot!” -Yue Zuo

Since 1998, the Center for Educational Innovation has formally recognized unsolicited student feedback and praise to University of Minnesota teachers through the Thank a Teacher program.

Have you had a teacher that has made a difference in your education? Thank them here.

Trevors’ research mentioned in “Learning from Donald Trump’s new rules”

Dr. Gregory Trevors

Dr. Gregory Trevors, post doctoral fellow in the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program and the Reading & Language Lab, was recently mentioned the Globe and Mail article, “Learning from Donald Trump’s new rules.” The article argues, “while leaders in the political arena and outside have followed certain time-honored rules for handling controversy and scandals… Trump has not” and shares five “new rules” based on his behavior.

Specifically in Rule 3 of the article, “Persuading people with facts may not work,” Globe and Mail argues that “facts failed to stop” Trump from winning the presidency. The publication supports this argument with Trevors’ research on how new information can threaten its recipients’ sense of identity. Originally covered by the British Psychological Research Society’s Digest, Trevors’ research shows that new information can trigger negative emotions, which impair the understanding and digestion of written information.

Learn more about research being done in the Reading & Language Lab.

Kendeou presents at symposium on reducing impact of misinformation, fake news

Dr. Panayiota Kendeou

Panayiota Kendeou, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology’s Psychological Foundations of Education program, recently traveled to Sydney, Australia, to present her work on the 12th biennial meeting of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC). Kendeou was part of a featured symposium–organized by two world-renowned experts on misinformation,  Ullrich Ecker (The University of Western Australia) and Stephan Lewandowsky (University of Bristol)–on research advances that reduce the impact of misinformation and fake news. At the event, Kendeou presented her work on the conditions that promote successful change of pre-existing beliefs in the context of her Knowledge Revision Components framework (KReC; Kendeou & O’Brien, 2014).

Dedicated to encouraging and promoting quality scientific research in applied domains, the SARMAC’s purpose is to enhance collaboration and co-operation between basic and applied researchers in memory and cognition.

Learn more about this and other work conducted in Kendeou’s Reading & Language lab.

Johnson awarded APF 2016 Gold Medal for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology

David W. Johnson

David W. Johnson, emeritus faculty member in the Department of Educational Psychology’s Psychological Foundations of Education program, was recently awarded the American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology. Johnson received the medal in a ceremony held in Denver, Colorado in August of 2016.

Johnson has authored over 500 research articles and book chapters and over 50 books. He’s a former editor of the American Educational Research Journal and has served as an organizational consultant to schools and businesses throughout the world. His research interests include: cooperative, competitive, and individualistic efforts; conflict resolution (structured controversy and peer mediation); and social psychology of groups in general. Johnson is active in the field of organizational development and change, and in innovation in educational practice. His work emphasizes the integration of psychology theory, research, and practice.

Psych foundations students to present at annual AERA meeting

Psychological foundations of education students, Kelsey Will, Reese Butterfuss, Bader Moshen, and Nic VanMeerten—as well as post-doctoral researcher Gregory Trevors—will present at the 2017 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting April 27-May 1. The theme of this year’s event is Achieving the Promise of Equal Educational Opportunity. Presentation topics will include:

  • “Reducing Interference from Misconceptions: The Role of Inhibition in Knowledge Revision,” Reese Butterfuss
  • “Exploring Student Engagement in an Augmented Reality Game,” Nic VanMeerten
  • “The Role of Quality Explanations in Knowledge Revision,” Kelsey Will
  • “Refuting vaccine misconceptions,” Gregory Trevors

Learn more about AERA’s Annual Meeting.

 

Nic VanMeerten, psych foundations student, hosts Games Research Forum

Nic_VanMeerten-thumbnailOn December 2nd, the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) Digital Games and Learning Research Collaborative led by Nic VanMeerten, Ph.D. student in the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, hosted a Games Research Forum that explored how to broaden interdisciplinary research on digital games and learning within the University of Minnesota system.

University of Minnesota faculty members Keisha Varma (Department of Educational Psychology), Lana Yarosh (College of Science and Engineering), and Edward Downs (University of Minnesota-Duluth) supported the effort as part of a collaborative leadership team.

Read the TECHdotMN article “Minnesota’s digital gaming minds meld at Games Research Forum” for a full recap of the event.

Varma promotes positive math mindsets, parent involvement for minority and immigrant families

Keisha Varma, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, is working with Anne Sullivan Middle School, as part of the project GopherMath to design programs to increase parent involvement for minority and immigrant families. Her work is a collaboration with faculty from the Department of Educational Psychology, Institute of Child Development, and Department of Curriculum and Instruction and is funded by the University of Minnesota’s Office of the President and Generation Next.

Currently, Varma is designing programming promoting positive mathematical mindsets, including dealing with math anxiety and supporting math learning in 3rd – 6th grade students. Parents attend monthly meetings that include presentations and small group discussions. Next semester, her work is expanding to include text messaging to support interactions between parents and teachers and encourage curriculum-informed math activities at home.

Three Educational Psychology faculty recognized with endowed chairs and professorships

Recently, three faculty members from the Department of Educational Psychology were honored with endowed chairs and professorships. These appointments— awarded over a period of three years— recognize the professors’ professional achievements and the impact of their work.

Dr. Clayton Cook (school psychology) is the first-ever John W. and Nancy E. Peyton Faculty Fellow in Child and Adolescent Wellbeing.  Dr. Panayiota Kendeou (psychological foundations of education) holds the Guy Bond Chair in Reading, and Dr. Michael Rodriguez (quantitative methods in education) will continue in his role as Campbell Leadership Chair in Education and Human Development. Please join us in congratulating them on their excellent contributions!

Faculty members in the Department of Educational Psychology hold a total of seven active endowed chairs and professorships.

Learn more about the other endowed chairs and professors of educational psychology.