Category Archives: Faculty & Staff

Dengel speaks at Hamline University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Hamline University, Biology Department on November 10. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Pediatric Vascular Health: Growing Up.”

Dengel gives talk at University of Maryland

On November 15, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Obesity and Pediatric Vascular Dysfunction: What are the Solutions?”

 

NYTimes quotes Kane on Thomas, Liberty sale

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is quoted in a New York Times article, “With the Liberty for Sale, What’s Next for Isiah Thomas?” Kane “said that providing team stability and being committed to making the Liberty a world-class organization ‘does not excuse his past behavior.'”

LaVoi and Baeth publish in The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport in the School of Kinesiology, and Anna Baeth, Kinesiology Ph.D.student and advisee of Lavoi, have published a chapter in the The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018. The article, “Women and Sports Coaching,” addresses the ways scholarship can be used to inform and influence the goal to increase the number of women coaching sports, currently in the minority around the world.

 

Vavrus and Demerath were plenary speakers at CIES

Dr. Frances VavrusFran Vavrus,  professor, and Peter Demerath, associate professor, in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), were both plenary speakers at the Comparative and International Education Fall Symposium held on October 26-27 at George Mason University. Their panels addressed the theme of the symposium, Interrogating and Innovating CIE Research, by focusing on the legacies of colonialism in educational research and on methodologies that offer alternative approaches to knowledge production. OLPD alumna Laura Willemsen and Ph.D. student Richard Bamattre also presented a paper at the conference on their innovative approaches to teaching comparative education at UM.

Frayeh, Lewis publish in Psychology of Sport and Exercise

Frayeh
Lewis

Amanda Frayeh, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology 2015 graduate, is lead author on an article she recently published with Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology. The article, which was based on Frayeh’s dissertation study, is titled “The effect of mirrors on women’s state body image responses to yoga,” and was published this month in Psychology of Sport and Exercise.  The study examined the effect of mirrors on women’s state body image and appearance comparisons during yoga. Lewis was Frayeh’s doctoral adviser.

Frayeh is currently an adjunct lecturer in the School of Kinesiology.

Stoffregen publishes with colleagues in PLOS ONE

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) published the article “Effects of decades of physical driving on body movement and motion sickness during virtual driving”  in PLOS ONE, one of the premiere peer-reviewed open access scientific journals.

Co-authors are Chui-Hui Chang, Fu-Chen Chen, and Wei-Jhong Zeng, all researchers at the Department of Physical Education at the National Kaohsiung Normal University in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Chui-Hui Chang and Fu-Chen Chen received their Ph.D. in kinesiology from the University of Minnesota, where they were co-advised by Dr. Michael Wade and Stoffregen.

NIH awards grant to Konczak lab to develop technology for treating a voice disorder

Jürgen Konczk, Ph.D.
Arash Mahnan, Ph.D. student

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology is the principal investigator on an NIH funded grant program administered through the University’s Office of Discovery and Translation that seeks to promote new therapies for rare diseases. The project will design and build a device that will improve the symptoms of a voice disorder called spasmodic dysphonia (SD).

People with SD experience involuntary spasms of the laryngeal musculature that leads to a strained or choked speech. There is no cure for the disease and speech therapy is ineffective. The device will alter how it feels when one speaks. The idea behind the technology is that this sensory trick will help patients to improve their voice quality.  The device development and its testing will be conducted in Konczak’s Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory.

Arash Mahnan, biomedical engineer and doctoral student in the HSC lab will serve as primary research assistant for this project.

 

Dengel publishes in Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is lead author of an article published in the journal Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article entitled “Reproducibility of blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes with end-tidal carbon dioxide alterations” examines the reproducibility of a new method to measure cerebral vascular reactivity using blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes in response to alterations in end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure during magnetic resonance imaging.

The methodology developed by this research establishes an accurate method for measuring blood vessel function in the brain, which may be used not only in
the comparison between various groups of individuals but also in longitudinal studies interested in treatment or examination of CVR over time (i.e., aging studies, traumatic brain injury evaluation).

 

Cuevas and Thompson present at Overcoming Racism conference on re-envisioning allyship

Jessica Thompson
Faustina Cuevas

CEHD senior academic advisers Faustina Cuevas and Jessica Thompson presented “Becoming an Accomplice: Are You Ready for the New Wave of Allyship?” at the 2017 Overcoming Racism conference at Metropolitan State University in St. Paul.

Their presentation addressed how the term ally has become a “buzzword, ” and how to move beyond allyship and shift towards becoming accomplices in social justice work. “Allyship” must be re-envisioned to better serve communities and dismantle systems of oppression. Participants learned the importance of the accomplice framework and its connection to advocacy.

U of M TRIO programs and CEHD Student Services celebrate first-generation students

Pictured are some of the TRIO programs and CEHD Student Services staff who were first-generation college students.

As part of the national First-Generation College Celebration on Nov. 8, U of M TRIO programs and CEHD Student Services staff and students shared their stories, and invited CEHD first-generation students to also share their story and celebrate being the first in their families to attend college. Approximately 39% of CEHD first-year students are first-generation students.

The inaugural event was founded by the Council for Opportunity in Education (COE) to mark the 52nd anniversary of the Higher Education Act of 1965. COE is  a nonprofit organization dedicated to the expansion of educational opportunities throughout the United States. The council works in conjunction with colleges, universities, and agencies that host federal TRIO programs.

Kinesiology’s Beth Bayley to perform in musical event “A Night At the Opera” at Gustavus Adolophus College

Beth Bayley, office manager in the School of Kinesiology and a soprano in the Minnesota Opera Chorus, will be performing at a musical event at Gustavus Adolphus College on November 18.

The collaborative concert, “A Night at the Opera,” features performers in southern Minnesota orchestras made up of elementary and high school students as well as adult volunteers, and is part of Minnesota Opera’s outreach endeavor, the CoOPERAtion Residency Program. The program sponsors tailor-made residencies in elementary and high schools in Minnesota communities to help kids learn about opera. Bayley also participated in a 2014 residency in Alexandria, which culminated in a concert with the Central Lakes Symphony Orchestra and Alexandria Area High School.

Bayley received her Doctor of Musical Arts from the U of M in 2016. She will be singing in this concert with two other Minnesota Opera performers. “I feel very privileged to work with the Minnesota Opera to bring opera to young people!” says Bayley. “Many of these residencies take place in communities where opera is not easily accessible, and the communities welcome us wholeheartedly.”

She has been performing and training with the Minnesota Opera since 2011. One of her most memorable experiences was workshopping the new opera, “The Manchurian Candidate” by Kevin Puts, which provided a look at the opera before it was completed. Bayley will be singing in their upcoming production of Massenet’s Thais in May, 2018.

More information about the Gustavus event and ticket availability can be found here.

LaVoi to speak at Gustavus Adolphus on Nov. 13

Gustavus Adolphus College alumna and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., will speak at her alma mater on Monday, November 13, on “Current Research on Girls and Women in Sport.” Her presentation will be held in Nobel Hall 201 at 5:30 p.m. Lavoi is also co-director of the School’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport.

LaVoi to participate in CEHD Alumni and Graduate Networking Event on Nov. 9

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, will participate in a speaking panel at a CEHD Alumni and Graduate Networking Event on Thursday, November 9, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at McNamara Alumni Center, University Hall.  The event, titled “Blaze Your Trail: Crafting a Career with Passion and Innovation,” features CEHD alumni who have forged unique career paths outside their degree programs.  The panel will share their stories and ideas on channeling creativity into professional success.

The event is geared to CEHD graduate and professional students, and an RSVP required. See more details here.

Dengel gives talk at Winona State University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Winona State University, Department of Health, Exercise, and Rehabilitative Sciences on November 1, 2017.

The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “The A, B, C’s of Graduate School.”

Seashore gives keynote at Nordic Educational Conference

Karen Seashore, Regents professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was in Norway last month, where she worked with school district leaders and school development agencies, gave a keynote presentation at the Nordic Educational Conference, and presented to 130 participants in a school leader preparation program.

 

Kinesiology alumna Yu-Ting Tseng awarded post-doc at National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan

Yu-Ting Tseng, Ph.D., 2017 graduate of the School of Kinesiology in the Biomechanics and Neuromotor Control emphasis, has been awarded a post-doc position in the Division of Child Health Research, Institute of Population Health Sciences in the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in Zhunan, Taiwan, starting in November. She will be conducting a study on the effect of different types of exercise intervention on the motor, cognitive and overall physical and mental functions in children and older adults. She may also assist in evaluating the status and needs for special needs populations.

Dr. Tseng was advised by Kinesiology professor Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.

Konczak gives lecture at Mini Medical School

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory in the School of Kinesiology, presented October 30 at the Academic Health Center’s Mini Medical School as part of their Fall 2017 series, “Medical Mysteries: Navigating Complex Health Cases.” His presentation with George S. Goding, Jr., M.D., professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, was titled “Finding a new treatment for the incurable voice disorder Spasmodic Dysphonia.” Konczak and Goding have been working with colleagues from Speech and Hearing Sciences and Engineering on a new treatment approach to improve the voice symptoms of patients with this voice disorder. Currently, there is no cure for the disease, though patients can get temporary relief through Botulinum toxin injections.

Comments from attendees after the presentation included:

This work gives me so much hope – what an interesting study!
Very interesting topic, more education on these topics is necessary so I am glad I was able to hear this presentation. Appreciated the presentation from both Dr’s because of the overlap!
Nicely simplified from complex information. Nice to hear U of M people are working together to make life better for those in need.
Loved the comment about calling around the U to find experts to help solve problems. There is so much happening at the U of M!!

Mini Medical School is a five-week program offered each semester that is designed to give individuals with a shared interest in health sciences the opportunity to examine the scientific foundations of health and disease presented by internationally renowned U of M experts who are shaping the way health care is delivered locally and globally.

Doctoral student Eydie Kramer presents at The Obesity Society meeting

Eydie Kramer, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology and advised by Dr. Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., is presenting at The Obesiety Society annual meeting on October 31, 2017 in Washington D.C.

Kramer will present a study on yoga intervention for African-American women that was conducted in the Behavioral Physical Activity Lab (BPAL) in 2016. Her poster titled “I Heart Yoga! A Pilot, Culturally-Tailored Yoga Intervention for African-American Women With Obesity” was selected as a top 10 abstract.

 

LaVoi to present at Wellesley College Oct. 25

image of Nicole M. LaVoiNicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center in the School of Kinesiology, will be guest speaking at Wellesley College on October 25 for the college’s LeadBLUE Athletic Leadership Academy. The title of her presentation is Building a Positive Team Culture.

Designed to facilitate leadership development tools and educational opportunities for all student-athletes, the LeadBLUE Athletic Leadership Academy aims to enhance the quality of team culture, student leadership, and the athletic experience at Wellesley.

LaVoi served as the head tennis coach at Wellesley from 1994-1998. See the complete announcement here.