Category Archives: Faculty & Staff

Weerts quoted in Star Tribune article about University of the People’s free tuition

David Weerts, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was quoted in the Star Tribune article “Free tuition draws Minnesota students to University of the People.”

“What remains to be seen is how the marketplace will respond in hiring University of the People graduates,” he said. He also wonders how a school could survive without paying instructors (Reshef says they receive honoraria of $3 an hour.) “I was surprised that they could find that many volunteers to actually teach,” said Weerts.

 

Gao and advisees publish in Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy

Kinesiology’s Richardson panelist at Sustainability Education Summit

portrait image of Tiffany Richardson taken in 2015Tiffany Richardson, Ph.D., lecturer in Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, is part of this year’s Sustainability Education Summit, organized by the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota. On September 15, all five University of Minnesota campus digitally co-hosted this event. Dr. Richardson, who is an IonE educator, talked about her involvement in teaching innovation in sustainability.

Stoffregen gives invited talk at National Academy of Kinesiology meeting

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), gave an invited talk at the 87th annual meeting of the National Academy of Kinesiology in Washington, DC, on September 16. His presentation was titled “Ecological physics and the perceptual information for motor control.

 

Thompson helps build graduate student exchange with Korean university

CEHD’s Marina Aleixo (center-left) and ICD’s Ross Thompson (center-right) meet with staff at Seoul National University.

Ross Thompson, M.Ed., a lead teacher at the Shirley G. Moore Lab School in the Institute of Child Development, recently traveled to South Korea to build a graduate student exchange with Seoul National University (SNU). Thompson was joined by Marina Aleixo, Ph.D., program director of international initiatives and relations at the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD).

During their trip, Thompson and Aleixo visited the SNU lab school, a training site for graduate students, and met with teachers to exchange ideas on research and best practices for early childhood education. Thompson also gave a talk on big body play and integrating early childhood education.

“It was an amazing first meeting with the faculty and grad students at SNU,” Thompson said. “The level of dedication and eagerness to learn displayed by the students shows the workings of a great potential partnership. We look forward to continuing to cultivate our relationship with SNU and its Lab School.”

ICI receives $10 million grant from US Department of Education

Congratulations to the Institute on Community Integration and David Johnson, Director, for receiving a $10M grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. This five-year cooperative agreement aims to establish the National Technical Assistance Center on Inclusive Practices and Policies. Sheryl Lazarus, Principal Investigator and Kristi Liu, Co-Principal Investigator.

Koenig receives Sara Evans Woman Scholarship and Leadership Award

Melissa Koenig
Melissa Koenig, Ph.D.

Melissa Koenig, Ph.D., professor in the Institute of Child Development, is the recipient of a 2017 Sara Evans Faculty Woman Scholar/Leader Award.

The award is sponsored by the University of Minnesota’s Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost and the Women’s Center. It recognizes women faculty at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities who have achieved significant scientific accomplishments, national and international reputations, and who contribute as leaders on campus.

Up to two awards are offered per year, one in science and engineering and one in humanities, arts, and social sciences. As a recipient of a 2017 award, Koenig will receive $5,000 to support her research.

Koenig will be honored during the Celebrating Changemakers 2017 awards program, which will take place on Oct. 19.

Kihl presents research at the European Association for Sport Management Conference

Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, attended and presented at the European Association for Sport Management held September 5-8 in Bern, Switzerland.

The title of Dr. Kihl’s presentation was “Examining the Dimensions of Athlete Representation in Sport Governance”. Vicki D. Schull, Ph.D., a 2014 graduate of the School of Kinesiology and current assistant professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and Caroline Heffernan, Ph.D. candidate were co-authors on the presentation.

LaVoi publishes essay on women coaches in Contexts

In honor of Title IX’s 45th year, Contexts magazine publishes a piece “title ix at xlv” with several viewpoints on this topic. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, contributed the essay “Woman Want to Coach“.

Other essays in this article are “Title IX at 45” by Cheryl Cooky, “Where All Kids Can Compete” by Erin Buzuvis, and “Union Busting and the Title IX Straw Man” by Ellen J. Staurowsky.

Contexts magazine’s goal is to make cutting-edge social research accessible to general readers.

 

 

 

 

 

Dengel and colleagues publish findings of childhood cancer survivor study

Donald Dengel, Ph.D.
Marlatt Kara, Ph.D.

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, published with colleagues in the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

Dengel’s former graduate student Marlatt Kara, Ph.D., now a postdoctoral researcher at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, LA, is the lead author of the article titled “The Effect of Atorvastatin on Vascular Function and Structure in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Clinical Trial.” This pilot study examines the development of cardiovascular disease in childhood cancer survivors.

Co-author Aaron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Minnesota, also received his doctoral degree in the School of Kinesiology.

Tucker Center’s “Media Coverage and Female Athletes” video rebroadcast

Media Coverage and Female Athletes
Media Coverage & Female Athletes

The Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to announce several new airings of its groundbreaking video, “Media Coverage and Female Athletes.”

tpt statewide digital MNChannel
Friday, September 8, 2017 at 5:00 AM
Friday, September 8, 2017 at 11:00 AM
Friday, September 8, 2017 at 5:00 PM
Friday, September 8, 2017 at 11:00 PM

The video builds on a research-based examination of the amount and type of coverage given to female athletes with commentary from expert scholars and award winning coaches and athletes who discuss this timely issue from a variety of perspectives as they help dispel the common—but untrue—myths that “sex sells” women’s sport, and no one is interested in it anyway. Effective strategies for increasing media coverage and creating images which reflect the reality of women’s sports participation and why this is so important are also discussed.

To view the entire program online now, click here. For more information on upcoming broadcasts, click here.

Gao selected as Chinese high-end foreign expert and Foreign Outstanding Instructor for Hunan Province in summer 2017

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL), was reappointed as a high-end foreign expert on Physical Activity and Health by the People’s Republic of China for summer 2017. During his appointment tenure, Gao was based at Hunan Normal University (Changsha, China) and stayed in China for one month over the summer.

Gao at Hunan Normal University

During his stay, Gao delivered a series of lectures on physical activity and health, helped the university establish the discipline in physical activity and health, offered a number of workshops to faculty and students, as well as trained the faculty and graduate students in conducting a cutting-edge research project. Gao is an alumnus of Hunan Normal University, where he received his bachelor’s degree in physical education.

In addition, Gao was selected as the Foreign Outstanding Instructor by Hunan Province of China in summer 2017. He was based at Huaihua University, where he delivered a course titled “Advances in Physical Activity and Health,” as well as mentored the faculty and students in conducting two research projects in the university and local rural communities. Gao’s lectures have been well-received by the students and faculty members at Huaihua University.

Gao lecturing at Huaihua University
Gao consulting on research project

 

 

 

 

 

Konczak lab receives NSF I-corps award

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, is the PI on a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) I-Corps program.

This program prepares scientists and engineers to extend their focus beyond the university laboratory and to accelerate basic-research projects that are ready to move toward commercialization. The aim of this grant is to move forward the lab’s robotic rehabilitation technology that is jointly developed with partners in Italy and Singapore. As part of this grant, a team consisting of postdoctoral researcher Naveen Elangovan (entrepreneurial lead), Jürgen Konczak and Pat Tarnowski as a business adviser is formed. Pat is a trained PT with an MBA and is currently the Senior Director of Clinical Health Solutions at BCBS of Minnesota. The team will work closely with NSF staff and advisers to explore and understand the U.S. market.

LaVoi publishes commentary on women coaches in SportsBusiness Journal

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, published an article on the importance of increasing the number of women coaching women’s sport teams in SportsBusiness Journal. While the number of women playing college sports has increased dramatically since the passage of Title IX in 1972, the number of women coaching them has decreased, from 90% in 1974 to 40% today.

“One hundred percent of male athletes have had a male coaching role model during their athletic careers, to their benefit,” writes LaVoi. “Young women likewise need and deserve more same sex role models.”

LaVoi helps produce the annual Women in College Coaching Report Card, which gives conferences and sports a grade of A through F for the percentage of women head coaches for women’s teams. She states that the Report Card provides accountability, creates awareness and helps stimulate a national dialogue on women in the coaching profession.

 

 

 

LaVoi opinion piece on leadership in SportsBusiness Journal

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, has written an opinion piece for the SportsBusiness Journal entitled, “Leadership on the sidelines should not be defined by gender” on women leaders and obstacles they face. The piece invites “leaders in athletics and business who are passionate about increasing the percentage of women in coaching to get involved.”

Demerath elected president of Council on Anthropology and Education

Peter Demerath, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), has been elected president of the Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE). A section of the American Anthropological Association, CAE was founded in 1968 to support scholarship on “schooling in social and cultural contexts, and on human learning both inside and outside of schools.” Its mission is “to advance anti-oppressive, socially equitable, and racially just solutions to educational problems through research using anthropological perspectives, theories, methods, and findings.”

Peter wins award for his collection of short fiction

Gary Peter, lecturer in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), has written a collection of short fiction, Oranges, which has been named the winner of the 2016 Many Voices Project Competition in Prose sponsored by New Rivers Press. The national competition promotes the work of new and emerging writers, with one prize given each year in prose and one in poetry. The prize includes a $1,000 honorarium as well as publication of his manuscript in fall 2018.

Konczak is senior personnel on $2.9 million NSF grant

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, is serving as senior personnel on a nearly $3 million training grant awarded by the National Science Foundation to develop and implement bold new graduate education in the STEM fields.

The award for the project, “Graduate Training Program in Sensory Science: Optimizing the Information Available for Mind and Brain,” was granted jointly to the Center for Cognitive Sciences and the Center for Applied and Translational Sensory Sciences. The grant will enable the centers’ teams to initiate a new interdisciplinary graduate training program that unites a fundamental understanding of basic sensory science (vision, audition, motor control, speech and language) with deep technical expertise in engineering, computer science, and other related fields. The project will explore the development of effective assistive technologies for people with sensory deficits that have a major impact on an individual’s quality of life.

Konczak is a member of the faculty of the Center for Cognitive Sciences and director of the Center for Clinical Movement Science. Colleges providing support on the grant are the College of Education and Human Development, College of Liberal Arts, and College of Science and Engineering. More information about the award is available here.

Christian Science Monitor quotes LaVoi on women coaches

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, is quoted in a Christian Science Monitor piece, “Why there’s been a big drop in women coaches under Title IX” on the phenomena and its logical outcome.

 

National evaluation study of Girls on the Run by Kinesiology professor Maureen Weiss reveals the program transforms young girls’ lives

An independent evaluation study by Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, shows that Girls on the Run, a national physical activity-based positive youth development program for elementary-age girls, has a profound and lasting positive impact on girls’ confidence, competence, connection to others, character, caring, and life skills.

Girls on the Run is a nonprofit organization that uses running as a vehicle for teaching life skills to girls in third through fifth grades. The intentional life skills curriculum and mandatory annual coach training set Girls on the Run apart from other activity programs. The three-part curriculum teaches understanding of self, valuing relationships and teamwork, and exploring one’s connection to the world.

Weiss’s study revealed that:

  • Girls on the Run participants were significantly more likely than girls in organized sport and physical education to learn and use life skills including managing emotions, resolving conflict, helping others or making intentional decisions.
  • 97% of girls said they learned critical life skills at Girls on the Run that they are using at home, at school and with their friends
  • Girls who began the program with below-average scores dramatically improved from pre- to post-season on all outcomes—competence, confidence, connection, character, and caring. This shows that girls who might need a positive youth development program benefited most from their participation.
  • Girls who were the least active before Girls on the Run increased their physical activity level by 40% from pre- to post-season and maintained this increased level beyond the program’s end.

The video and the website illuminate the study findings through an interactive format. The study has also been publicized on Globe Newswire.

“Girls on the Run participants scored higher in managing emotions, resolving conflict, helping others, and making intentional decisions than participants in organized sport or physical education,” said Weiss.  “Being able to generalize skills learned in the program to other situations such as at school or at home is a distinguishing feature of Girls on the Run compared to traditional youth sports and school PE, and suggests that the intentional life skills curriculum and coach-training program can serve as exemplars for other youth programs.”

This study got also mentioned in The Daily Iowan.