Category Archives: Faculty & Staff

LaVoi quoted on reasons for bias in hiring women soccer coaches

In the past, high school and college women’s soccer teams were coached overwhelmingly  by women. After Title IX was passed in 1972 and women’s sports began attaining greater support and prestige, more men became interested in coaching women’s sports teams. Their numbers grew dramatically while women coaches’ numbers declined.  Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, was quoted in an online article in SBNation, “Soccer’s ugly sexism is keeping women from coaching the beautiful game,” on reasons for the bias in hiring. Lavoi gave a presentation on women coaches in soccer at the 2017 NSCAA convention last January.

 

Kane quoted in Newsday article comparing women athletes to male athletes

Dr. Mary Jo KaneA June 27 article in Newsday ,“Female athletes don’t have to beat men to be the best in their sport”, discusses tennis star John McEnroe comparing world-class talent Serena Williams with male players. He called her the greatest woman to play tennis, “but if she had to just play… the men’s circuit that would be an entirely different story.”

In the article, Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology professor and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, weighs in on the prevalence of comparing women athletes to male counterparts. “The broad issue is why can’t great female athletes simply be great without the constant comparison to men?” she says in the article. ““When North Carolina wins the NCAA Tournament, people don’t demand they go beat Cleveland or the Golden State Warriors. In boxing, you don’t ask the middleweight champion to beat the heavyweight.” When we compare men to women, she says, “it takes away from their greatness. They aren’t allowed to be great on their own.”

Shirazi spoke about reconfiguring representations at Columbia University

Roozbeh Shirazi, assistant professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), spoke on Reconfiguring Representations of The Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia as part of a special panel at Columbia University. His presentation explored the politics of representation in the classroom at a time of heightened political tensions between the US and Iran. It featured ethnographic research he carried out in the Twin Cities that addressed pedagogical challenges and possibilities in how English teachers approach the graphic novel Persepolis with students. The panel was sponsored by Teachers College, the Middle East Institute of Columbia University, and the Department of Social Studies Education at Teachers College.

Kin PhD student Christiana Raymond is lead author on article published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

Christiana Raymond, M.S., doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the journal, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. The article, “Accuracy and reliability of assessing lateral compartmental leg composition using dual-energy X-ray absoprtiometry,” examined the accuracy and reliability of a novel dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning method in the frontal plane for total, fat, and lean mass quantification of the anterior and posterior upper leg compartments. The article was part of Ms. Raymond’s master’s thesis.

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, Foster Bosch, B.S., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., graduates of the School of Kinesiology, are co-authors on this article.

Mary Jo Kane interviewed on MPR for the 45th anniversary of Title IX

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, will be interviewed by Minnesota Public Radio host Tom Weber on Thursday, June 22, at 11:00 a.m. on 91.1 FM.

Kane will be discussing the 45th anniversary of the passage of Title IX, the social and cultural impact of the law, progress made in the last four decades, and areas of improvement still needed in the world of women’s sports.

Listen to the interview from June 22, 2017: 45 years of Title IX: what’s changed?

Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory researchers present at ACSM’s 64th Annual Meeting

Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory - logoZan Gao, Ph.D.,  associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the  Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), together with his doctoral students June Lee, Zachary Pope, and Nan Zeng, took part in the American College of Sport Medicine’s (ACSM) 64th Annual Meeting in Denver, CO, held May 30-June 3. At the conference, the lab members presented their research:

Gao, Z., Li, X.X., Zeng, N., Pope, Z., Yang, H.H., Liu, W.F., Xiong, H., Chen, Y.T., Li, J., & He, W. (2017, June). Accuracy of smartwatches in assessing college students’ energy expenditure in exercise with different intensities.

Lee, J., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang. Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Associations among objectively-determined physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and cognitive function in preschool children.

Pope, Z., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Effects of mhealth apps on physical activity and weight loss outcomes: A meta-analysis.

Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Liao, N., Han, C.Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Predicting biomarkers through affordable fitness band in Chinese breast cancer survivors.

Zeng, N., Li, X.X., Yang, H.M., Liu, W.F., Xiong, H., Chen, Y.T., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). The effects of different types of exercise on Chinese college students’ energy expenditure.

Zeng, N., Han, C.Y., Liao, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, June). Examining the relationships among Chinese breast cancer survivors’ psychosocial outcomes and physical fitness.

 

Dengel and students publish book chapter

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology in exercise physiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is lead author of a chapter titled “Assessment of muscle mass” appearing in the book Body Composition: Health and Performance in Exercise and Sport recently published by CRC Press. School of Kinesiology doctoral student Christiana Raymond and School of Kinesiology graduate Dr. Tyler Bosch are also authors on the chapter.

Dengel, students present at ACSM

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology in exercise physiology, and students traveled to the American College of Sport Medicine’s (ACSM) Annual Meeting in Denver, CO held May 30-June 3 to give several presentations.

Poster presentations were:
  • “Total and Segmental Body Composition Examination in Collegiate Football Players Using Multifrequency BIA and DXA.” Christiana Raymond (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology doctoral student), Tyler Bosch (University of Minnesota), Donald Dengel (University of Minnesota).
  • “Effect Of Body Composition And Mass Adjustments On Workload Estimation In NCAA Division I Football Players.” Bryce Murphy (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology master’s student), Donald Dengel (University of Minnesota), Eric Klein (University of Minnesota), Dustin Perry (University of Minnesota), Chad Pearson (University of Minnesota) Tyler Bosch (University of Minnesota).
  • “Effects of Multiple Sports Related Concussions On Neurocognition and Cerebral Vascular Function.” Nicholas Evanoff (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology doctoral student), Kara Marlatt (University of Minnesota), Bryon Mueller (University of Minnesota), Suzanne Hecht (University of Minnesota), Jeffery Wozniak (University of Minnesota), Kelvin Lim (University of Minnesota), Donald Dengel (University of Minnesota).
  • “Body Composition And Bone Mineral Density Of Division I Collegiate Track And Field Athletes.” Donald Dengel (University of Minnesota), Kathryn Keller (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology undergraduate student), Aaron Carbuhn (Kansas University), Philip Stanforth (University of Texas-Austin), Jonathan Oliver (Texas Christian University), Tyler Bosch (University of Minnesota).
  • “Validation of a Three-Dimensional Body Scanner for Body Composition Measures.” Michelle Harbin (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology doctoral student).
  • “Body Composition And Bone Mineral Density Of NCAA Division I Football Players” (oral presentation). Tyler Bosch (University of Minneasota), Aaron Carbuhn (Kansas University), Philip Stanforth (University of Texas-Austin), Jonathan Oliver (Texas Christian University), Kathryn Keller (University of Minnesota, School of Kinesiology undergraduate student), Donald, Dengel (University of Minnesota).

Weiss and legacy of students present research at NASPSPA

image of Dr. Maureen Weiss and her students at NASPSPA 2017Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and 12 graduate students spanning 30 years and three institutions, presented research studies and convened for an “academic family dinner” at the annual meeting of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA) in San Diego held on June 3-7, 2017.

The photo shows Weiss with former and current students at the University of Oregon, University of Virginia, and University of Minnesota. Students from the University of Minnesota include Alison Phillips (Ph.D., 2015) and Lindsay Kipp (Ph.D., 2012) in the front row, and Nicole Bolter (Ph.D., 2010), Hailee Moehnke (current M.S. student), and Sarah Espinoza (current Ph.D. student) in the back row. Weiss was president of NASPSPA in 2005-2006 and just completed a 5-year term on the Executive Committee as Past-President’s Liaison.

CEHD researchers use brain scans to predict autism in high-risk, 6-month-old infants

L-R: Jed Elison, Jason Wolff

College of Education and Human Development researchers contributed to a new study that suggests that patterns of brain activity in high-risk, 6-month-old babies may accurately predict which of them will develop autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at age 2.

The new study was published in Science Translational Medicine and led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Jed Elison, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Institute of Child Development, and Jason Wolff, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, were study co-authors. The study was conducted by the IBIS Network and funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Approximately one out of 68 school-aged children in the U.S. has a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, and their younger siblings are at a higher risk of developing the condition. “These findings need to be replicated, but that said, we are very excited about the potential to leverage cutting edge technology to advance the search for the earliest signs of autism,” Elison said.

For the study, researchers used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the brain’s functional connectivity – or how different brain regions work together – in high-risk, 6-month-old infants. The infants were considered high-risk because they have an older sibling with autism. Overall, 59 high-risk infants were included in the study. Eleven of the infants were diagnosed with ASD at 2 years old and 48 were not.

The researchers applied machine learning algorithms to the infants’ brain scans to identify patterns that separated them into the two groups. They then applied the algorithm to each of the infants to predict which infants would later be diagnosed with ASD. The algorithm correctly predicted nine of the 11 infants who were later diagnosed with ASD and all 48 of the infants who were not later diagnosed with the condition.

According to the researchers, if replicated, the results could provide a clinically valuable tool for detecting ASD in high-risk infants before symptoms set in. This in turn would allow researchers to test the effectiveness of interventions on a population of high-risk infants who have been identified as having a greater risk of ASD based on their brain scan at 6 months of age.

“The researchers will now try to confirm their findings in larger groups of children. But they already have provided proof of principle that it’s possible to detect ASD long before children show the first visible signs of the condition,” NIH Director Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D., wrote in a blog about the study. “The findings could pave the way for developing more cost-effective mobile neuroimaging tools, which might be used in early ASD screening.”

In February 2017, Elison and Wolff contributed to a separate study that used MRI scans of high-risk infants conducted at 6 and 12 months of age to accurately predict which infants would later meet criteria for ASD at age 2. The method used in the new study would only require one scan at 6 months of age.

“This is really interdisciplinary science at its very best, and I anticipate it will eventually lead to improved outcomes for children and families,” Wolff said. “The ability to predict autism in infancy opens the door for something that has long been improbable: pre-symptomatic intervention.”

Lavoi interviewed on Way of Champions podcast

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is featured in a Way of Champions podcast, in which she discusses a variety of issues, including women in sport leadership, women in coaching, kids’ participation in sports, “background anger,” and the connection between winning at sports and character development. Listen here.

Leo McAvoy, professor emeritus in the School of Kinesiology, wins U of M Outstanding Achievement Award

Leo McAvoy, Ph.D., professor emeritus of recreation in the School of Kinesiology, has been awarded the University of Minnesota’s prestigious Outstanding Achievement Award.

Dr. McAvoy earned a Ph.D. in 1976 in Recreation, Park, and Leisure Studies from the College of Education and Human Development and taught and conducted research for over 30 years in the School of Kinesiology. He has been honored numerous times nationally for his contributions to the parks and recreation field, and early in his career was elected to the Academy of Leisure Sciences, one of 55 such scholars in North America at the time. In 2004 he received the Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt Award for Excellence in Recreation and Park Research, his field’s highest award.

During his career, Dr. McAvoy focused his research on populations often overlooked in the field–access for individuals with disabilities and initiatives with American Indians related to their relationship to outdoor recreation and recreation resources. He pioneered efforts in the 1980s and ’90s to create opportunities for access to the outdoors for all people, and to achieve inclusion and inclusive programming.

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., School director from 2005-2011, says, “Deeply committed to issues of diversity and social justice, Professor McAvoy was one of the first scholars in the country who placed at the center of their work the various and important ways individuals with disabilities interact with the outdoor environment. He is one of the most dedicated and passionate people I know, an individual who has had a profound impact in both his personal and professional capacity.”

The Outstanding Achievement Award may be conferred only on graduates or former students of the University who have attained unusual distinction in their chosen fields or professions or in public service, and who have demonstrated outstanding achievement and leadership on a community, state, national, or international level. It is the highest honor bestowed by the University outside of the Honorary Doctorate degree.

A college ceremony honoring Dr. McAvoy is planned for late summer or early fall.

Women Coaches Report cited in article on UM Duluth gay coach lawsuit

Data from the Tucker Center’sWomen Coaches Report Card Series,” authored by Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., was cited in a Grand Forks Herald article, “Gay coaches counter University of Minnesota Duluth’s claims in $18 million lawsuit.” UMD’s Director of Marketing and Public Relations noted UMD’s “A grade” for the percentage of women’s teams with female head coaches.

Barr-Anderson, students present at ACSM

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., and students traveled to the American College of Sport Medicine’s Annual Meeting in Denver, CO held May 30-June 3 to give several presentations. Barr-Anderson is an assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology in behavioral aspects of physical activity.

Tutorial: Hot Fitness Trends to Promote Health and Physical Activity in Minority Communities – Yoga. Daheia Barr-Anderson

Oral Presentation: Exploring the link between exercise identity and intervention dosage: I-FIT (Initiating Feelings of Individual Transformation). Eydie Kramer, Kinesiology doctoral student; Daheia Barr-Anderson

Poster Presentation: Vertical jump test as a health-promotion screening tool for predicting bone strength in young adults. Maggie King, Kinesiology doctoral student; Steven Levy, Lucas Carr, and Kathleen Janz, Iowa State University

Hoffman receives professional development grant from U of M Foundation

Brandi Hoffman

Congratulations to Brandi Hoffman, director of the School of Kinesiology’s Physical Activity Program (PAP), who has been awarded a $1,000 professional development grant from the University of Minnesota Foundation.  The award, donated by Carrie Sampson-Moore, will be used to support Hoffman’s Physical Activity Program.

Sampson-Moore is the director for Physical Education at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and is an alumna of the School’s master’s program. She was part of a 2015 delegation to China led by School director Li Li Ji to discuss college/university instructional physical activity programs in the U.S. and China.

Aizawa has article accepted for publication in Sport Management Review

School of Kinesiology visiting scholar Kurumi Aizawa, Ph.D., has had an article accepted for publication in Sport Management Review. The article, “Long-Term Impact of the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games on Sport Participation: A Cohort Analysis,” reports the findings that individuals who experienced the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games during youth participated in sport more frequently than other generations.

Co-authors on the publication are Ji Wu, graduate student in Sport Management; Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management; and Mikihiro Sato, Ph.D., assistant professor at James Madison University, VA.

Gao’s research on exergaming highlighted in CEHD Vision 2020 blog

School of Kinesiology associate professor Zan Gao, Ph.D., has written an article on his work related to the positive health outcomes of fitness technology and exergaming on the CEHD Vision 2020 blog.

His research shows that replacing younger students’ “screen time” on tablets or computers with apps for exercise games can be as effective as physical education classes.

Gao emphasizes that exercise games on the computer do not replace time playing outside or the traditional physical education curriculum. Instead, he says, “we hope that active, fitness-oriented apps and games can replace sedentary time young people spend using tablets, watching television or playing traditional games – not physical activities like sports, biking or outside play.”

“Exercise games are not just a fad,” says Gao,  “and can be part of our approach to capturing the attention of students who are not drawn to athletics and physical education.”

Gao is director of the School’s Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory.

 

Dengel quoted on positive effects of exercise on circulation in Experience Life

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology was recently quoted in the June issue of Experience Life, an online health and fitness magazine, on how exercise improves circulation. “The circulatory system loves exercise,” Dengel says in the article, and explains that exercise makes the circulatory system stronger, more flexible, and more expansive, which in turn boosts athletic performance. The article can be accessed here.

Orr receives travel grant to present at North American Society for Sport Management

Madeleine Orr

Madeleine Orr, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, advised by Dr. Yuhei Inoue, assistant professor of sport management, has been awarded a Council of Graduate Students travel grant for $600  to attend and present at the North America Society for Sport Management Conference. Orr’s presentation is titled: “Toward a Practitioner-Oriented Framework of Event Legacy: A Case Study of Toronto 2015.”

Several other Kinesiology faculty members and graduate students are participating in the conference, held in Denver, CO from May 30 until June 2.

  • Kurumi Aizawa, Ph.D., visiting scholar from Waseda University Research Institute for Sport Knowledge in Tokyo, Japan, presents “Leveraging Events for Sport Participation: The Case of the Japanese National Sports Festival.”
  • Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., presents “Sport Spectatorship and Live Satisfaction: A Multi-City Investigation.”
  • Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., presents “Athlete Representation in the Governance of Intercollegiate Sport,” together with Ph.D. student Caroline Heffernan.
  • Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., participates in a symposium titled, “The Paradoxical Decline of Women in Coaching: Time for Radical Structural Change.”

The detailed conference program is available online.

Dahia Barr-Anderson and Sanaz Khosravani receive 2017 Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle awards

Dr. Barr-Anderson
Ms. Khosravani

A faculty member and doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology have been selected to receive awards from the College of Education and Human Development’s Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle (WPLC).

Dahia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School, has received the Rising Star Faculty Award of $1,500 to use for professional development.  She joins an elite group of CEHD female faculty members in the college who have received this prestigious award.

Sanaz Khosravani, a Kinesiology doctoral student in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, will receive a $1,400 Graduate Student Ph.D. award based on the review committee’s assessment of her “academic achievements, community involvement, leadership, and passion for her academic and professional career.”

The awards will be conferred at the WPLC’s annual celebration on Tuesday, June 13, at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul.