Category Archives: Faculty & Staff

Weiss and Former Students Receive Outstanding Research Writing Award

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues and former students Nicole Bolter (PhD, 2010, UMN) and Lindsay Kipp (PhD, 2012, UMN), are recipients of the Outstanding Research Writing Award for their article published in Volume 87 of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES). The Research Council of the Society for Health and Physical Education (SHAPE) recognized the authors at their annual meeting on March 16. This award identifies one article in each yearly volume of RQES that characterizes an outstanding contribution of scholarship and writing quality from among all manuscripts published that year. This is the seventh time that Weiss has personally been recognized with this scholarly writing award.

Dr. Weiss (left), Dr. Bolter (center), and Dr. Kipp (right)

The full citation is, Weiss, M. R., Bolter, N. D., & Kipp, L. E. (2016). Evaluation of The First Tee in Promoting Positive Youth Development: Group Comparisons and Longitudinal Trends. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 87, 271-283.

Here is a brief abstract: Purpose: This manuscript represents the third in a series documenting our longitudinal evaluation of The First Tee, a physical activity-based youth development program that uses golf as a vehicle for teaching life skills and enhancing developmental outcomes. Previous phases of our project: (a) established initial data-based evidence of effectiveness through cross-sectional and qualitative methods (Weiss et al., 2013), and (b) provided validity and reliability for a measure of life skills transfer in three studies using mixed methods (Weiss et al., 2014). The purpose of the present phase was to: (a) compare youth in The First Tee to youth in other activities on life skills transfer and developmental outcomes, and (b) examine change and stability over three years in life skills transfer among youth in The First Tee. Method: In Study 1, youth participating in The First Tee (N = 405) and a comparison group (N = 159) completed measures of key constructs. In Study 2, a longitudinal sample of 192 youth participating in The First Tee completed the life skills transfer measure for three consecutive years. Results: Study 1 revealed that youth in The First Tee compared favorably to youth in other activities on 5 of 8 life skills and 6 of 8 developmental outcomes, and Study 2 showed that scores improved or remained stable for life skills transfer over time. Conclusion: Results from both studies show that The First Tee is effective in teaching for transfer of life skills and promoting developmental outcomes.

KARE11 video interview with Tucker Center’s Nicole LaVoi on USA Hockey boycott

Tucker Center co-director and Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., was interviewed in a KARE-11 video piece, “The Team USA Women’s Hockey boycott is winning for a few reasons” in which Dr. LaVoi spoke to the various reasons the boycott has been successful.

Kinesiology’s Madeleine Orr and Morgan Betker awarded wins at CEHD’s Three Minute Thesis competition

image of Morgan Betker and Madelleine Orr, winners at the CEHD 2017 Three Minute Thesis contest
Betker, left, and Orr at 3MT competition

Madeleine Orr and Morgan Betker, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidates and finalists in CEHD’s Research Day Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, won prizes in the Finalist Competition held today, March 28, at the McNamara Alumni Center.

Orr (sport management emphasis, advised by Dr. Yuhei Inoue) was awarded the $500 first prize for her presentation, “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” Betker (exercise physiology emphasis, advised by Dr. Eric Snyder) won the $250 People’s Choice award for her presentation, “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers.

The six finalists from five departments across the college had exactly 3 minutes to explain their research projects in an engaging and easy-to-understand format to a packed room in McNamara.

“Telling a compelling story about your research and its implications in less than 3 minutes is way harder than I thought it was going to be!” said Orr after the event. “But to represent Kinesiology with Morgan, and come away with such great results, was a great experience.”

Betker says, “As researchers, we don’t often get the opportunity to share our passion with people outside of our niche, nor hear others’ perspectives in their chosen emphasis. This competition was an excellent way to not only challenge ourselves and grow professionally, but to broaden our perspectives and find value in the work of fellow graduate students in other fields. I’m very grateful to have been a part of the experience.”

3MT is a worldwide competition that was introduced by the University of Queensland in 2008. This is the second year the college has held the event as part of CEHD Research Day. Judges for today’s event were Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.


LaVoi is guest speaker at Haverford Group’s spring meeting

Tucker Center co-director and Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., was a guest speaker at this year’s Haverford Group spring meeting held March 25-27 at Macalester College in St. Paul.

LaVoi spoke on the topic, “Women in Coaching and Team Culture.”

The Haverford Group was created in the mid-1980s to bring together an influential group of academic institutions concerned with the positive influence, thinking and direction of NCAA Division III athletics. Members include Amherst College, Austin College, Bridgewater College, Bryn Mawr College, Centre College, Clark University, DePauw University, Grinnell College, Haverford College, Lewis & Clark College, Macalester College, Occidental College, Pomona-Pitzer College, Skidmore College, Smith College, Swarthmore College, Washington & Lee University, Wellesley College, Wesleyan University, Whitman College and The College of Wooster.

 

 

 

In memorium: Clifford Hooker

Clifford Hooker, professor emeritus and a national expert in school law, passed away on November 15, 2016, in St. Paul at the age of 96. Hooker was known as a master teacher, mentoring students and fostering internships, always engaged in the community and statewide. He authored The Courts and Education published in 1978 and conceived of—then served 30 years as the chair of the editorial advisory committee for—West’s Education Law Reporter.

Professor Hooker was born in Illinois, the son of a sharecropper and a mother who ensured he was able to attend the local one-room school. As valedictorian of McClure High School’s class of ’38, he received free tuition to attend teachers college. He graduated and married his first wife, Avelyn, in 1941, before serving in the Navy aboard the USS Massachusetts in the Pacific. In the post-war years their children Sherrill and Donn were born, and he worked in Illinois public education as a shop teacher, principal, and superintendent. He completed his Ed.D. at Indiana University in 1955 and a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia University before taking his first academic position at the University of Pittsburgh.

In 1958, Clifford Hooker joined the U of M faculty, from 1964 to 1972 chairing the Department of Educational Administration, which would become what is now the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD). He founded the Educational Administration doctoral track and was influential in a 1965 restructuring of the college that reduced hierarchy and fostered faculty participation in decision-making. He also helped to found the Midwest Council for Educational Administration in 1971 in response to changes in licensing requirements for Minnesota school administrators. MCEA included higher education institutions from North and South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Manitoba, and Minnesota.

Professor Hooker was active in many sports before it was popular to stay fit, including biking, tennis, jogging, barefoot waterskiing, golfing, and downhill skiing. He designed and built a cabin on Pelican Lake in 1965 and shared it for departmental retreats. He also got his colleagues to join him in canoeing in the boundary waters. Officially retiring in 1991, he remained active in the field, consulting widely and supporting educational leadership.

He is survived by his wife, Leslie Gerstman, their daughter Sarah, and two grandchildren.

Gifts in memory of Professor Clifford Hooker may be made to the Educational Evaluation and Policy Studies Fellowship, Fund #6027, University of Minnesota Foundation.

Tianou Zhang, Kinesiology PhD candidate, to present at U’s Doctoral Research Showcase April 11

The University’s tenth annual Doctoral Research Showcase will include a presentation by Tianou Zhang, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate and advisee of Li Li Ji, Ph.D., director of the School of Kinesiology.

The Showcase will be held Tuesday, April 11 from 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. in the Great Hall, Coffman Memorial Union.

The goal of the Doctoral Research Showcase is to help doctoral fellows develop their abilities to talk about their research to audiences outside of their disciplines and to gain exposure for their work with key stakeholders.

Mr. Zhang’s research presentation is “Dietary Antioxidant Protection Against Inflammation in Exercise and Obesity.” All Kinesiology colleagues are invited to attend and support Mr. Zhang.

For more information about the event or to view a list of all of this year’s participants, visit: z.umn.edu/drs2017.

Ruth Rath, Kinesiology PhD student, and Wade to publish in EBioMedicine

Ruth Rath, Ph.D. student in Kinesiology,  and Michael Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, have written an article on posture and aging to be published in EBioMedicine, a journal that specializes in publishing research and commentary on translational medicine.

The title of the article is, “The two faces of postural control in older adults: Stability and Function.”

Wade is a research scientist in Kinesiology’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) and Rath is a graduate assistant and graduate student researcher in the lab. She is advised by Wade and Kinesiology professor Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D.

LaVoi, Hamilton manuscript accepted to Journal of Moral Education

Nicole LaVoi, 2013Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and Tucker Center co-director in the School of Kinesiology, and former Tucker Center RA and Kinesiology graduate Dr. Maya Hamilton, have a manuscript accepted for publication in the Journal of Moral Education titled, “Coaches Who Care: The Ethical Professional Identity Development of Moral Exemplar Collegiate Coaches.” This paper is part of Hamilton’s dissertation.

Crain’s Detroit Business article quotes Tucker Center’s Kane

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Tucker Center for Research in Girls & Women in Sport, is quoted in a Crain’s Detroit Business article, “Women in the front office: There aren’t many, and that’s bad for business.” Kane notes that “gender equity efforts in professional sports have been a mixed bag.”

Cuevas presents on faculty and staff affinity groups at national student affairs conference

Faustina Cuevas

CEHD Student Services senior academic adviser Faustina Cuevas presented at the 2017 NASPA conference for higher education student affairs professionals, held in San Antonio.

Cuevas and Gilbert Valencia, residence director with U of M Housing & Residential Life, presented “Starting a Faculty & Staff Affinity Group: Importance, Challenges & Sustainability.” Their session focused on the tools and resources needed to start a faculty and staff affinity group on campus. They shared strategies and challenges they faced in starting the Latino/a Faculty and Staff Association at the U of M, hopefully inspiring others to see the need and importance of affinity groups to build community and retain diverse staff and faculty.

Cuevas and Hammell present on microaggressions

Tracey Hammell
Faustina Cuevas

CEHD Student Services senior academic advisers Faustina Cuevas and Tracey Hammell recently presented “Microaggressions:  Did that just really happen?” to the U of M Department of Family Medicine and Community Health. Their presentation examined microaggressions’ role in society and their effect on people. Cuevas and Hammell discussed what steps can be taken to understand and limit microaggressions in our own way of being as well as creating awareness of microaggressions with others.

Stoffregen featured in latest Science News cover story

The cover story of the March 18 issue of Science News includes the latest research being conducted by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL). Stoffregen is quoted extensively on his work related to virtual reality, motion sickness, and the sex connection.

 

LaVoi to serve on panel at event at Villanova University

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and Tucker Center co-director in the School of Kinesiology, will be at Villanova University on March 24, 2017, to serve as a panelist for the event,“The Grace of Playing: A Conversation on Sports and Their Role in Human Flourishing.”

Kane to moderate session at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study conference

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Tucker Center for Research in Girls & Women in Sport, will be moderating the session, “Gender, Media, and Popular Culture,” at the conference “Game Changers: Sports, Gender, and Society” to be held April 6-7 at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Award-winning book on sport management theory features chapters by Inoue, Kane, and Kihl

Three School of Kinesiology faculty contributed chapters to an award-winning book on sport management theory.

Routledge Handbook of Theory in Sport Management was selected as an Outstanding Academic Title 2016 by CHOICE magazine, published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., and Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., each wrote chapters. This is the first book to trace the intellectual contours of theory in sport management, and to explain, critique and celebrate the importance of sport management theory in academic research, teaching and learning, and in the development of professional practice.

Inoue and Kihl contributed to the Managerial Theories section with their chapters, “Developing a Theory of Suffering and Academic Corruption in Sport” (Kihl) and “Applying Strategic CSR in Sport” (Inoue). Kane contributed the chapter “The Continuum Theory: Challenging Traditional Conceptualization and Practices of Sport” in the section Sociocultural Theories. Dr. Kane is director of the School of Kinesiology’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, and Dr. Kihl is an affiliated scholar in the Tucker Center.

Williams Ridge receives director’s award

Headshot of Sheila Williams Ridge
Sheila Williams Ridge

Sheila Williams Ridge, M.A., director of the Shirley G. Moore Lab School in the Institute of Child Development, received the 2016 Director’s Award from the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE).

NAAEE is a membership organization that aims to accelerate environmental literacy and civic engagement through education. The Director’s Award recognizes an individual or organization that has made a significant contribution to the field of environmental education.

Williams Ridge was recognized for her work chairing the 2016 Nature-based Preschool Conference, the annual conference of NAAEE’s early childhood environmental education initiative, the Natural Start Alliance.

In addition, Williams-Ridge is on the advisory team for the Natural Start Alliance and the National Science Foundation-funded Science of Nature-Based Learning Collaborative Research Network. She also serves on the leadership team for the Council of Nature and Forest Preschools.

HSCL colleagues’ article listed as one of most influential papers of 2016 by Veterinary Clinics: Equine Practice

The journal Veterinary Clinics: Equine Practice has published a summary of the most influential papers in equine medicine for 2016. One of these is by Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL) colleagues in collaboration with a group of equine veterinarians from the University of Minnesota/Michigan State University. The paper is entitled “The Equine Movement Disorder “Shivers” Is Associated with Selective Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Axonal Degeneration.”

Valberg SJ, Lewis SS, Shivers JL, Barnes NE, Konczak J, Draper AC, Armién AG. Vet Pathol. 2015 Nov;52(6):1087-98. doi: 10.1177/0300985815571668

Stoffregen quoted in ScienceNews

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was interviewed about his research related to motion sickness and virtual reality for the March 18 edition of ScienceNews. A number of researchers believe that sensory mismatch is to blame for the motion sickness that can be present with virtual reality use, but Stoffregen believes that instability is the culprit. The full article can be accessed here.

Stoffregen also is lab director for the School’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory.

Betker and Orr are finalists in CEHD Three Minute Thesis Competition

Morgan Betker
Madeleine Orr

Two Kinesiology doctoral candidates are finalists in CEHD’s Research Day competition, Three Minute Thesis (3MT), which will be held March 28  from 10-11 a.m. in the McNamara Alumni Center Johnson Room.

Morgan Betker (exercise physiology emphasis) and Madeleine Orr (sport management emphasis) will be competing with six doctoral students from across the college for the first prize of $500. Prizes of $250 will go to the runner-up and people’s choice. The finalists were chosen from a preliminary round competition held last week.

Ms. Betker’s presentation is “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers” and Ms. Orr’s presentation is “The rhetoric vs. the reality of sport event legacies.”

3MT is an annual competition held in over 200 universities worldwide. It’s designed to challenge Ph.D. students to present their research in just three minutes in an engaging format that can be understood by an audience with no background in their discipline. The competition is intended to help students develop a presentation on their research and hone their academic communication skills to explain their work effectively to a general audience.

Judges in the CEHD competition are Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African-American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.