CEHD News Kinesiology

CEHD News Kinesiology

Dengel presents at University of Utah

Dr. Don DengelDonald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Utah in the Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation on February 5. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “Measuring Vascular Function: From Peripheral to Cerebral.”

Barr-Anderson presents at Minne-College in Arizona

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented at Minne-College in Arizona held in Scottsdale, AZ, on February 10. The title of her presentation was “Move More to Weigh Less: The Importance of Physical Activity to Address Childhood Obesity.” Also attending were CEHD Dean Jean Quam, Serena Wright, CEHD Sr. Alumni Director, and a number of U of M alumni. Minne-College in Arizona is sponsored by the U of M Alumni Association.

Konczak gives talk to U of M ataxia group colloquium

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, gave a lecture on “Somatosensory training to overcome motor dysfunction in dystonia and Parkinson’s disease” to the University of Minnesota ataxia research group. The ataxia group is an interdisciplinary group of basic science and clinical researchers interested in understanding the neuropathology of ataxia and its treatment. Dr. Konczak spoke about how a sensory-based rehabilitation training can improve motor function in focal dystonia and Parkinson’s disease.

KARE-11 features Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report in story on National Girls and Women in Sports Day

KARE 11 TV gave a nod to the Tucker Center’s  2017- 18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences in their story related to the National Girls and Women in Sports Day celebration on February 7. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, was interviewed for the story and said the report “hopefully stimulates dialogue, raises awareness, helps to recruit and retain more women in the coaching profession, and holds decision-makers who hire coaches more accountable.”

Dengel shares insight on impact of Olympic Games

With the XXIII Olympic Winter Games opening in Pyeongchang County, South Korea on February 8, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is quoted on the U of M homepage on the long-term impact the Olympic Games can have on host countries. Read the feature here.

During winter break, Dengel led a course in London, England, about the impact of the 1908, 1948 and 2012 Olympics on the city, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and on sport. He also taught Sport and Politics Collide: 1936 & 1972 German Olympics.

Weiss receives Legacy Award by Girls on the Run International

From the left: Liz Kunz (CEO of GOTRI), Maureen R. Weiss, Allie Riley (Senior VP of Evaluation and Programming)

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was recognized with the Legacy Award, the highest honor given by Girls on the Run International at its annual Summit in Austin, TX, in January. Girls on the Run is a 501(c)(3) organization and physical activity-based positive youth development (PA-PYD) program designed to enhance girls’ social, psychological, and physical skills and behaviors to successfully navigate life experiences. The program uses running and other physical activities as a platform for teaching life skills and promoting holistic health outcomes for girls in grades 3-8. The organization’s reach is national—in all 50 states with over 200 local community councils, 50,000 volunteer coaches, and over 1.5 million girls served since inception. The organization is committed to diversity—serving girls from all walks of life and backgrounds. Nearly 50% of girls receive subsidized registration fees to enable them to attain the psychosocial and behavioral benefits of participating in each season’s 10-week program.

Weiss’ Legacy Award was based on eight years and hundreds of hours devoted to serving this non-profit organization—as a board member, consultant, speaker, and contributor to curricular development and effective coach delivery—as well as conducting an independent longitudinal evaluation study that demonstrated strong and lasting positive impact of program participation on girls’ life skills learning and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes—confidence, competence, connection, caring, character, and contribution to community and society. The study received widespread attention in a press release last August and Weiss presented the study results at the Summit meeting in a presentation titled, “How and Why Girls on the Run is an Exemplary Positive Youth Development Program.”


Joey Kronzer to serve as volunteer assistant tennis coach for Hamline University

Joey Kronzer, a current Kinesiology master’s student with an emphasis in sport and exercise psychology, and a member of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, has been named the Volunteer Assistant Coach of the Hamline University Men’s and Women’s Tennis Teams. The complete announcement is available here.

Kronzer is advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, professor in the School of Kinesiology.

Tucker Center releases 2017-18 NCAA Division-I Women Coaches Report

The Tucker Center, in collaboration with the Alliance of Women Coaches, is proud to announce the release of the 2017-18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences report and infographic. 40+ years after the passage of Title IX, female sport participation is at an all-time high but the percentage of women coaching women at the collegiate level is stagnant. While the number of collegiate coaching opportunities is also at a record high, only 20% of all college coaching positions for men’s and women’s teams are filled by women. One goal of this report is to change that trend. View the report and infographic here…

Lewis is co-author of article on fall prevention and physical activity resources for older adults

LewisBeth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology,  is a co-author with U of M colleagues from the School of Nursing, the School of Public Health, and the Department of Psychology, an article in The Gerontologist. “Older Adults’ Utilization of Community Resources Targeting Fall Prevention and Physical Activity”  discusses the effects of older adults knowing about and using local community resources to improve their level of physical activity, which is related to fall prevention in older adults. The study shows that the effects are only short-term and suggests research to identify future strategies.

Leon co-author on Alzheimer’s study

Art Leon, M.D., professor of exercise physiology in the School of Kinesiology, is a co-author of a study recently published in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias. The article is titled “Determination of Aerobic Capacity via Cycle Ergometer Exercise Testing in Alzheimer’s Disease.” The study investigated older adults with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) to determine individualized aerobic capacity and ability to perform treadmill testing due to balance or gait issues.

First author of the publication is Leon’s former doctoral student Ulf G. Bronas, Ph.D., ATC, associate professor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, at the University of Illinois, Chicago.


Strib quotes LaVoi on NFL fan behavior

portrait image of Nicole M. LaVoiIn an article, “Can Philly fans change their image? Yes, but only if they want to,” the Star Tribune quotes Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center. LaVoi and others talk about the hows and whys of fan behavior, with some thoughts about what could happen at this year’s Superbowl.

LaVoi to keynote at first-ever WISTCA women4women event

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, will be the opening keynote for the first-ever women4women event held in conjunction with the 29th Annual Wisconsin Track Coaches Association (WISTCA) Conference held in Madison, WI, February 1-3, 2018. LaVoi’s talk is titled, “Educate.Stimulate.Advocate: Thriving in the Coaching Profession,” and will offer strategies for women coaches as well has how male allies can help.

NFL Players Association presents to Sport Management students

Left to right: Ji Wu, Christopher Nettleton, Leo Lewis, Carl Francis, Jo Ann Buysse, Don Davis, George Atallah

As Minneapolis hosts Super Bowl LII, on Tuesday, January 30, over 100 School of Kinesiology sport management students had the opportunity to listen to some of the top executives in the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA). Students from Dr. Jo Ann Buysse’s Sport in a Diverse Society class, Christopher Nettleton’s Sport Marketing class, and Ji Wu’s Sport Business class attended this event. Not only did they learn about the NFLPA, they also had the chance to ask questions about important social, medical, and business issues affecting the players in the NFL.

The National Football League Players Association (NFLPA) is the union for professional football players in the National Football League. Established in 1956, the NFLPA has a long history of assuring proper recognition and representation of players’ interests. The NFLPA has shown that it will do whatever is necessary to assure that the rights of players are protected—including ceasing to be a union, if necessary, as it did in 1989. In 1993, the NFLPA was again officially recognized as the union representing the players, and negotiated a landmark Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) with the NFL. The current CBA will govern the sport through 2020.

The NFLPA was represented by Carl Francis, Director of Communications, Don Davis, Sr., Director of Player Affairs, and Senior Advisor to the NFLPA Executive Director, and George Atallah, Assistant Executive Director of External Affairs.

Left to right: Ji Wu, Christopher Nettleton, Leo Lewis, Carl Francis, Jo Ann Buysse, Don Davis, George Atallah

Inoue secures funding for Japan College Sport Research program

image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, received 20k funding from the Sport Industry Research Center at Temple University.

For the last two years, Inoue is part of the Japan College Sport Research program, where he and the project leads, Dr. Jermey Jordan and Dr. Daniel Funk at Temple University are assisting the University of Tsukuba, Japan with its effort to create a new athletic department and disseminate its newly adopted model of athletics administration to other universities across Japan. The project funds Inoue received as co-investigator will be used to deliver workshops for Japanese university administrators and to develop the organizational structure for the new athletic department at Tsukuba.

For more information about this project and Inoue’s involvement, see The Japan Times article “Japanese collegiate sports study ends Phase 1.”

LaVoi discusses Character Development in Sport on MomEnough podcast

Nicole M. LaVoi

For the recent issue of the MomEnough parenting podcast, Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, discusses character development in sport, reflects on expectations, and parental issues. She also provides practical tips for supportive parenting.

Visit the podcast’s website and listen to the audio titled “Youth sports, child health and character development: Candid reflections and practical tips from Dr. Nicole Lavoi of CEHD (U of M).”


Kinesiology’s Betker and Orr involved in 3MT® events

In preparation for this year’s 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition, CEHD is hosting a Mentoring Workshop on February 1. Last year’s University-wide 3MT winner Madeleine Orr, a sport management doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology will serve as a panelist at this event.

In addition, Orr and Kinesiology’s Morgan Betker, doctoral student with a focus on exercise physiology and previous winners of the CEHD 3MT competition are asked to be judges for the preliminary round of the competition, which will be held on Monday, February 26 and Thursday, March 1 of this year.

Madeleine Orr
Madeleine Orr
Morgan Betker
Morgan Betker

LaVoi’s edited book, Women in Sports Coaching, an international best-seller

The book “Women in Sports Coaching“, published 2016 by Routledge and edited by Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center was selected by Choice magazine as one of their Outstanding Academic Titles (OAT) for 2017.

The book is part of the Routledge Research in Sports Coaching series which provides a platform for leading experts and emerging academics to present ground-breaking work on the history, theory, practice, and contemporary issues of sports coaching.

A total of 24 titles (over 7,000 books are published by Taylor & Francis/Routledge) are selected by Routledge and CRC Press as Outstanding Academic Titles (OAT), awarded by Choice Magazine from 2012-2017.

Sport Management Graduate Student Madeleine Orr interviewed for CEHD’s Vision 2020

Madeleine Orr, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology with the emphasis on sport management was recently interviewed for the CEHD Vision 2020 blog about her research on the economic, social and environmental impact of large-scale international sporting events.

As Minneapolis prepares for the upcoming Super Bowl events, Orr talks in the article titled “Does Hosting Sports Events like the Olympic Games or Super Bowl Really Benefit Cities?“, about how Minneapolis prepares for the upcoming “Big Game” events, as well as the impact that hosting the Olympics can have on cities.


Kinesiology student and goaltender Sidney Peters nominated for 2018 Hockey Humanitarian Award

Photo courtesy of University of Minnesota Athletics.

Sidney Peters, a School of Kinesiology senior majoring in kinesiology and minoring in biology, and Gophers Women’s Ice Hockey goaltender is one of 11 nominees for the 2018 Hockey Humanitarian Award. The award is presented by the Hockey Humanitarian Award Foundation and is presented annually to a hockey student-athlete who makes significant contributions to both his/her team and community through leadership and volunteerism.

With over 785 volunteer hours logged, Peters is involved in many community outreach volunteer activities. She is a certified Emergency Medical Technician and volunteers for both the University of Minnesota EMS and the Rush-Copley Emergency Department in Aurora, IL. In the summer of 2016, Peters traveled to Haiti with Project Mediashare, an organization dedicated to providing and empowering Haitians with quality health care. While she was there, she volunteered at Hospital Bernard Mevs, which is the country’s only critical care and trauma hospital. Peters has also volunteered as the head goalie coach for Hockey Ministries International seasonal sports camps in Chicago.

During her Gopher career, she has given back to the community by volunteering locally with HopeKids, Special Olympics Minnesota, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital.

Finalists for the Hockey Humanitarian Award will be announced in February, and the 2018 recipient will be honored on April 6 as part of the NCAA Men’s Frozen Four weekend in St. Paul, MN.

For more information on Peters and her nomination, visit gophersports.com.