CEHD News Kinesiology

CEHD News Kinesiology

Konczak, Tseng publish article in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D.
Dr. Konczak
Y-Ling Tseng
Dr. Tseng

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, is a co-author on an article recently published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.  Age-Related Decline of Wrist Position Sense and its Relationship to Specific Physical Training” examines the effects of aging on proprioception (a person’s perception of their limb and body positions necessary for motor control) by comparing wrist acuity in older and younger populations, and explores the effects of  training or regular physical activity on preserved wrist proprioception.

Konczak’s former advisee Yu-Ting Tseng, Ph.D. (2017), is also an author on the article. She is currently a post-doc at the Division of Child Health Research, Institute of Population Health Sciences in the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in Zhunan, Taiwan.

 

New Health and Wellness Promotion minor to be offered next spring

The School of Kinesiology is offering a new all-University undergraduate minor in Health and Wellness Promotion starting in Spring 2018. Students will study the effects of physical activity and recreation in terms of community, individual health and overall wellness. Focusing on the health, physical activity, and nutrition in the context of society, they will learn how to create and utilize programs that promote physical activity, leisure and wellness. The minor will prepare students for a variety of career paths in allied health, industry, business, teaching, and community service. 

“We are very excited to offer the new Health and Wellness Promotion Minor.  There is increased attention on promoting health and wellness as a strategy to prevent chronic disease, and our hope is that this minor will help undergraduates gain a stronger understanding of how physical activity, recreation, wellness, and nutrition can be promoted in their professional career.”  

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director in the School of Kinesiology

This interdisciplinary minor is a campus-wide program, open to all undergraduate students regardless of college or major. Detailed program information and how to apply can be found on the Health and Wellness Promotion minor’s webpage.

Orr to compete in University-wide presentation of 3-Minute-Thesis

Madeleine Orr

Last spring, Madeleine Orr, School of Kinesiology Ph.D. student, won the College of Education and Human Development’s 3-Minute Thesis Competition (3MT) with her presentation, “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” On December 1 she will take the podium again as the University of Minnesota Graduate School hosts the U of M’s 3MT preliminary-round winners in a second competition. Orr will present along with Ruben D’sa from the College of Science and Engineering, Irene Bueno Padilla from the College of Veterinary Medicine, and Amritha Yellamilli from the Medical School.

Originally established by the University of Queensland in 2008, 3MT challenges research students to communicate the significance of their projects to a general audience in just three minutes, with the aid of a single, static slide.

Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend and support the presenters. The winner will represent the University of Minnesota at the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) 3MT competition. In addition, participants will be invited to present their research at the upcoming Board of Regents meeting.

Orr is in the Sport Management emphasis and is advised by Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D.

Presentations are from 9-10 a.m. in 402 Walter Library. Awards and reception follow. Register to attend here.

 

 

 

Dengel speaks at Hamline University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Hamline University, Biology Department on November 10. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Pediatric Vascular Health: Growing Up.”

Dengel gives talk at University of Maryland

On November 15, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Obesity and Pediatric Vascular Dysfunction: What are the Solutions?”

 

NYTimes quotes Kane on Thomas, Liberty sale

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is quoted in a New York Times article, “With the Liberty for Sale, What’s Next for Isiah Thomas?” Kane “said that providing team stability and being committed to making the Liberty a world-class organization ‘does not excuse his past behavior.'”

Raymond-Pope, Dengel, and Bosch publish in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Kinesiology doctoral student Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on an article written with kinesiology professor Donald Dengel, Ph.D., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., and published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 

The article, “Total and Segmental Body Composition Examination in Collegiate Football Players Using Multifrequency Bia and Dxa,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between two different means of measurement used in assessing total and segmental percent body fat.

Raymond-Pope is currently advised by Dengel, and Bosch is a former advisee who graduated with his Ph.D. in kinesiology in 2014. Dengel is the director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology in the School of Kinesiology.

Raymond-Pope
Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Tyler Bosch
Dr. Bosch

 

LaVoi and Baeth publish in The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018

LaVoi
Baeth

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport in the School of Kinesiology, and Anna Baeth, Kinesiology Ph.D.student and advisee of Lavoi, have published a chapter in the The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018. The article, “Women and Sports Coaching,” addresses the ways scholarship can be used to inform and influence the goal to increase the number of women coaching sports, currently in the minority around the world.

 

Frayeh, Lewis publish in Psychology of Sport and Exercise

Frayeh
Dr. Frayeh
Lewis
Dr. Lewis

Amanda Frayeh, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology 2015 graduate, is lead author on an article she recently published with Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology. The article, which was based on Frayeh’s dissertation study, is titled “The effect of mirrors on women’s state body image responses to yoga,” and was published this month in Psychology of Sport and Exercise.  The study examined the effect of mirrors on women’s state body image and appearance comparisons during yoga. Lewis was Frayeh’s doctoral adviser.

Frayeh is currently an adjunct lecturer in the School of Kinesiology.

Stoffregen publishes with colleagues in PLOS ONE

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) published the article “Effects of decades of physical driving on body movement and motion sickness during virtual driving”  in PLOS ONE, one of the premiere peer-reviewed open access scientific journals.

Co-authors are Chui-Hui Chang, Fu-Chen Chen, and Wei-Jhong Zeng, all researchers at the Department of Physical Education at the National Kaohsiung Normal University in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Chui-Hui Chang and Fu-Chen Chen received their Ph.D. in kinesiology from the University of Minnesota, where they were co-advised by Dr. Michael Wade and Stoffregen.

Kinesiology master’s student Joey Kronzer presents at AASP conference through COGS Travel Grant award

Joey KronzerJoey Kronzer, a School of Kinesiology second year master’s student in the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab, presented his research, “Using E-Prime 2.0 to develop sport-specific video analysis training protocols,” at the 32nd Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference (AASP) held Oct. 18–Oct. 21 in Orlando, FL. Kronzer presented and attended at the conference through a travel grant award from the Council of Graduate Students (COGS).

Kronzer is an advisee of Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D.

 

NIH awards grant to Konczak lab to develop technology for treating a voice disorder

Jürgen Konczk, Ph.D.
Arash Mahnan, Ph.D. student

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology is the principal investigator on an NIH funded grant program administered through the University’s Office of Discovery and Translation that seeks to promote new therapies for rare diseases. The project will design and build a device that will improve the symptoms of a voice disorder called spasmodic dysphonia (SD).

People with SD experience involuntary spasms of the laryngeal musculature that leads to a strained or choked speech. There is no cure for the disease and speech therapy is ineffective. The device will alter how it feels when one speaks. The idea behind the technology is that this sensory trick will help patients to improve their voice quality.  The device development and its testing will be conducted in Konczak’s Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory.

Arash Mahnan, biomedical engineer and doctoral student in the HSC lab will serve as primary research assistant for this project.

 

Dengel publishes in Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is lead author of an article published in the journal Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article entitled “Reproducibility of blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes with end-tidal carbon dioxide alterations” examines the reproducibility of a new method to measure cerebral vascular reactivity using blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes in response to alterations in end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure during magnetic resonance imaging.

The methodology developed by this research establishes an accurate method for measuring blood vessel function in the brain, which may be used not only in
the comparison between various groups of individuals but also in longitudinal studies interested in treatment or examination of CVR over time (i.e., aging studies, traumatic brain injury evaluation).

 

Kinesiology’s Beth Bayley to perform in musical event “A Night At the Opera” at Gustavus Adolophus College

Beth Bayley, office manager in the School of Kinesiology and a soprano in the Minnesota Opera Chorus, will be performing at a musical event at Gustavus Adolphus College on November 18.

The collaborative concert, “A Night at the Opera,” features performers in southern Minnesota orchestras made up of elementary and high school students as well as adult volunteers, and is part of Minnesota Opera’s outreach endeavor, the CoOPERAtion Residency Program. The program sponsors tailor-made residencies in elementary and high schools in Minnesota communities to help kids learn about opera. Bayley also participated in a 2014 residency in Alexandria, which culminated in a concert with the Central Lakes Symphony Orchestra and Alexandria Area High School.

Bayley received her Doctor of Musical Arts from the U of M in 2016. She will be singing in this concert with two other Minnesota Opera performers. “I feel very privileged to work with the Minnesota Opera to bring opera to young people!” says Bayley. “Many of these residencies take place in communities where opera is not easily accessible, and the communities welcome us wholeheartedly.”

She has been performing and training with the Minnesota Opera since 2011. One of her most memorable experiences was workshopping the new opera, “The Manchurian Candidate” by Kevin Puts, which provided a look at the opera before it was completed. Bayley will be singing in their upcoming production of Massenet’s Thais in May, 2018.

More information about the Gustavus event and ticket availability can be found here.

LaVoi to speak at Gustavus Adolphus on Nov. 13

Gustavus Adolphus College alumna and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., will speak at her alma mater on Monday, November 13, on “Current Research on Girls and Women in Sport.” Her presentation will be held in Nobel Hall 201 at 5:30 p.m. Lavoi is also co-director of the School’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport.

LaVoi to participate in CEHD Alumni and Graduate Networking Event on Nov. 9

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, will participate in a speaking panel at a CEHD Alumni and Graduate Networking Event on Thursday, November 9, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at McNamara Alumni Center, University Hall.  The event, titled “Blaze Your Trail: Crafting a Career with Passion and Innovation,” features CEHD alumni who have forged unique career paths outside their degree programs.  The panel will share their stories and ideas on channeling creativity into professional success.

The event is geared to CEHD graduate and professional students, and an RSVP required. See more details here.

Dengel gives talk at Winona State University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Winona State University, Department of Health, Exercise, and Rehabilitative Sciences on November 1, 2017.

The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “The A, B, C’s of Graduate School.”

Kinesiology undergraduate Elisheva Savvateev receives UROP award

Elisheva Savvateev, an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Thomas Stoffregen, Ph. D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, supervises her project, “The driver passenger effect in head mounted virtual reality.” Continue reading “Kinesiology undergraduate Elisheva Savvateev receives UROP award”

Kinesiology alumna Yu-Ting Tseng awarded post-doc at National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan

Yu-Ting Tseng, Ph.D., 2017 graduate of the School of Kinesiology in the Biomechanics and Neuromotor Control emphasis, has been awarded a post-doc position in the Division of Child Health Research, Institute of Population Health Sciences in the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in Zhunan, Taiwan, starting in November. She will be conducting a study on the effect of different types of exercise intervention on the motor, cognitive and overall physical and mental functions in children and older adults. She may also assist in evaluating the status and needs for special needs populations.

Dr. Tseng was advised by Kinesiology professor Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.

Kane publishes invited chapter in Research in the Sociology of Sport series

cover of Reflections on Sociology of Sport volume showing person skiing down snow-covered slopeDr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, has published an invited chapter in the just-released Reflections on sociology of sport: Ten questions, ten scholars, ten perspectives (Kevin Young (Ed.); Bingley, UK: Emerald Press; ISBN 9781787146433).

In this tenth and celebratory volume in the Research in the Sociology of Sport series, ten recognized sport scholars from around the world (Toni Bruce, Cora Burnett, Jay Coakley, Agnes Elling, Steve Jackson, Mary Jo Kane, Joe Maguire, Roy McCree, Fabien Ohl, Gertrud Pfister) reflect on their respective academic journeys. They each address ten questions summarizing their career and their view of the current and future status of the sociology of sport.