Category Archives: Postsecondary Teaching and Learning

Gunnar elected to membership in the National Academy of Education

Dr. Megan Gunnar

Megan Gunnar, Ph.D., director of the Institute of Child Development, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Education (NAEd).

The NAEd aims to advance high-quality education research and its use in policy and practice. The academy consists of 209 U.S. members and 11 foreign associates who are elected on the basis of outstanding scholarship related to education. Gunnar was one of 14 new members elected to membership this year.

As an NAEd member, Gunnar will play a role in NAEd’s professional development programs and serve on expert study panels that address pressing issues in education.

Gunnar will be inducted during a ceremony for new members at the 2017 NAEd Annual Meeting in November.

Family Social Science launches new M.A. in prevention science

Family Social Science (FSOS) has launched a new master’s degree program in prevention science that will help prepare family science practitioners to prevent or moderate major human dysfunctions before they occur.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Prevention Science will equip students to confront many of the daunting challenges facing today’s families and communities, including trauma and drug addiction. The M.A. in Prevention Science will also help students develop strategies to promote the health and well-being of families.

Core coursework for the M.A. in Prevention Science gives students a solid foundation in statistics and research methodology, family conceptual frameworks, and ethics. Students can choose the Plan A which includes a thesis, or the Plan B which includes a project and a paper.

The M.A. in Prevention Science is intended for individuals who would like to build a career that supports families and works to redirect maladaptive behaviors.

The program is currently accepting applications for Fall 2017. The application deadline is March 1, 2017.

FSOS Ph.D. student awarded grant

FSOS Ph.D. student Renada Goldberg was recently awarded a grant from the Minneapolis Foundation. Renada will work with the Center on Women, Gender, and Public Policy to conduct a community-based participatory research project in partnership with African American parents, caregivers, and leaders of nonprofits to study and ultimately help shape state and municipal public policies such as the new paid leave policy in Minneapolis.

FSOS profs offer post-election commentary

FSOS professors Abi Gewirtz and Bill Doherty offered post-election thoughts in local and national media outlets, respectively.

Local NBC affiliate, KARE 11 featured Abi Gewirtz and her thoughts on talking to kids regarding the current mood in the country.

The Wall Street Journal featured Bill Doherty and his thoughts on moving forward in familial relationships when parties disagree on the outcome of the election. Independent.co.uk also featured Doherty’s thoughts.

See Gewirtz on KARE 11 here. Learn more about her and her research interests here.

Read Doherty’s comments in WSJ here. Read his comments in Independent hereLearn more about him and his research interests here.

Solheim, Wieling, and Ballard publish new textbook

immigrantrefugeetextbookDepartment of Family Social Science faculty members Cathy Solheim and Liz Wieling, along with FSOS Ph.D. student Jaime Ballard, recently published a breakthrough textbook titled, Immigrant and Refugee Families: Global Perspectives on Displacement and Resettlement Experiences.

While they were preparing to teach “Global Perspectives on Immigrant and Refugee Families,” Solheim and Wieling noticed that while there was a wealth of information regarding the immigrant experiences of individuals, very few textbooks focused on immigration experiences as it pertained to the family as a whole.

With the help of Ballard, Solheim and Wieling created a text that discusses current theoretical frameworks and synthesizes current research specific to immigrant and refugee families.

Read the textbook, which is available for free through University of Minnesota Libraries.

Learn more about Solheim, Wieling, and Ballard on their respective profile pages.

 

 

Boss: “No such thing as ‘closure’ in relationships”

Pauline BossIn an interview with NPR, Department of Family Social Science professor emeritus Pauline Boss said there is no such thing as “closure” when relationships end.

This  month NPR featured Boss in a segment of On Being with Krista Tippett titled “The Myth of Closure.”

According to the Orlando Sentinel,  Boss placed emphasis on the importance of remembering loved ones, and that actively trying to “get over” a death or failed relationship often prevents people from being able to do just that.

Boss also praised CNN anchor Anderson Cooper for putting “closure” in its proper place in the media when interviewing survivors and family members after tragedy.

“I know from his own biography that he knows what loss is, and he understands that there is no closure. He’s the only reporter I’ve ever heard explain that in the line of his work, and I think the rest of us have to do a better job of it, too.”

Boss coined the term “ambiguous loss” for her pioneering research on what people feel when a loved one disappears. However, she says, “We have to live with loss, whether clear or ambiguous, and it’s okay.”

Listen to “The Myth of Closure” on NPR here.

Read the Orlando Sentinel article here.

Learn more about Pauline Boss and her research interests here. 

J.B. Mayo, Jr. Receives Research Award for “Uncovering Queer Spaces in the Harlem Renaissance”

Jazz singer, Ethel Waters
Jazz singer, Ethel Waters

Each year, the  Institute on Diversity, Equity and Advocacy grants Multicultural Research Awards that “transform the University by enhancing the visibility and advancing the productivity of an interdisciplinary group of faculty and community scholars whose expertise in equity, diversity, and underrepresented populations will lead to innovative scholarship and teaching that addresses urgent social issues.”  Associate Professor in Curriculum & Instruction, J.B. Mayo, Jr., received one of the prestigious grants for his proposal to integrate LGBTQ history into the social studies curriculum that covers the Harlem Renaissance.

The research project entitled “Uncovering Queer Spaces During the Harlem Renaissance” is aimed at breaking the silence within social studies education about LGBT people, themes, and histories. Mayo plans to engage intersectional realities that include race, gender, and sexual orientation while helping teachers to be more inclusive of LGBT people, themes, and histories within their social studies classes.

Another goal of Mayo’s research is to allow LGBT students, and particularly queer students of color, to see themselves positively represented. He plans to conduct intensive archival research this summer in Harlem’s Schomburg Center for Black Culture to find the stories of gay artists of color working during the Harlem Renaissance. He will then co-create an LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum with local social studies teachers that center on the chosen artists’ work and identities. The finished curriculum will be field tested in area social studies classes. Mayo plans to observe the lessons as they are taught and follow-up with interviews with the participating teachers and selected students to discuss their impressions and to gather their perceptions of the impact of these lessons, which are aimed at not only changing young people’s views of history, but diminishing homophobia within communities of color and in society more generally.

Find out more about the Department of Curriculum & Instruction’s commitment to diversity and social justice and the research degree in social studies education.

 

 

 

 

Literacy Ph.D. Student Wins Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle award

annecrampton
Anne Crampton, Ph.D. candidate in Curriculum & Instruction wins WPLC award.

Anne Crampton, a fourth-year Ph.D. student in Literacy Education received the Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle (WPLC) award for graduate students. The award is for women graduate students to recognize their achievements and successes in their field of interest. The criteria for the award includes academic achievements, community involvement, leadership, and passion for the academic and professional career of choice. 

Crampton’s research focus is in secondary critical literacy where she is currently looking at the student experience in both a large, urban high school and a small, urban charter school. “I think it is significant that we have such different experiences in schools, within and certainly across districts. I’m not comparing them, just trying to notice some of the plurality of schooling. Also, there can be negative stereotypes assigned to large, urban schools because people often don’t see the strengths of the students,” Crampton says.

After 15 years as a classroom teacher, Crampton pursued her Ph.D. in Literacy Education to have a better understanding of what shapes the education system and the root of inequity in the classroom. “Certain things kept me awake at night about what I didn’t think was fair or right. I wanted to understand it and be a part of the conversation in order to change it,” she noted.

Crampton’s Ph.D. studies have helped her make more sense of some of the arguments in public education and the urgency around them. She feels there are very positive and effective education techniques that offer the chance for a transformative learning experience. “I’d like other people to know that effective education does happen and it’s possible. People want to hear about successful education techniques in three words, but it’s complicated. Implementing new techniques takes support, an excellent teacher, flexibility, and the support of the school district.“

Crampton is particularly focused on the value of “aesthetic experiences” in the classroom, referring to big projects that students have a creative stake in that allow an aspect of performance, be it a podcast or a play. Citing the need for opportunities to engage emotionally and critically with ideas: “I think you can do all those things in many different disciplines,” Crampton believes these types of experiences in the classroom support the growth of the students as humans and honors their abilities.

Crampton plans to use her award to disseminate ideas and learn from her peers through conference travel and potentially support the purchase of additional Garage Band apps for classrooms in her research.

Weiss to speak at international conference on children, youth, and physical activity

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology, is an invited speaker at a Maureen Weissconsensus conference on children, youth, and physical activity in Copenhagen, Denmark, on April 4-7.

The aim of the conference is to have expert scholars communicate scientific knowledge about the effect of various types of physical activity on children’s cognitive functioning, psychological well-being, physiological outcomes, and social inclusion.

The conference presentations and discussions will result in consensus statements and recommendations for future research and professional implications that will be launched at an international press conference. Consensus statements and recommendations will be communicated to various stakeholders in white papers in the months following the conference. Weiss’ presentation is on the contribution of youth physical activity to self-perceptions and social relationships.

 

FSoS alumnus benefits from deportation reprieve program

PerezDAfter years of living in the United States illegally, Daniel Perez, a former FSoS undergraduate student and current graduate student, has a green card after qualifying for a federal program that offers deportation reprieve for immigrants who entered the country as children.

Perez, who crossed the Mexican border when he was 15, qualified for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), passed by the Obama administration in 2012.

According to an article in the Star Tribune, for those who qualify, DACA offers a temporary reprieve from deportation and a work permit. For some immigrants married to U.S. citizens, the program also allows government-approved travel abroad to nullify their initial illegal entry into the country and permit them to apply for a green card.

Perez’s wife, Kendra, a Canadian who is now a U.S. citizen, sponsored him.

Through DACA, Perez has been granted “advanced parole,” according to the Star Tribune. This means that a person with a pending immigration application has permission to  re-enter the country, as long as they had an educational, professional, or humanitarian reason to leave the country. Perez, who now works as a social worker in Minneapolis, was granted advance prole for a professional conference in Canada.

Now Perez and his wife are planning his first trip to Mexico since he and his family left in 2002. They will visit his grandparents and other family.

Perez will be eligible to apply for citizenship in 2018.

Read the Star Tribune Article here.

Serido helps students and families make better decisions about financing higher education

Professor Joyce SeridoDepartment of Family Social Science associate Professor Joyce Serido teamed up with Extension educators across the state to create a pilot program that helps students and families make better choices about financing higher education.

The program began in January, and Serido will meet with Extension educators in February to fine tune the program to make it accessible to various groups statewide.

Read more about Serido’s work in Source Magazine.

Learn more about Serido’s research on her profile page.

Learn more about personal finance and financial education resources.

Walker’s article selected as best paper by FCSRJ

The Family & Consumer Sciences Research Journal selected FSoS associate professor Susan Walker’s article “Family Educators’ Technology Use and Factors Influencing Technology Acceptance Attitudes” as the best paper in family and consumer sciences education published by the journal in 2015.

FCSRJ chose her article for the following reasons: the topic is original, the research design and methodology demonstrate high standards, and the article has the potential to make a lasting contribution to the theory and/or practice in family and consumer sciences.

Walker’s article is one of seven published by FCSRJ in 2015 to be recognized. The journal published a total of 28 articles in 2015.

Read the article here.

Learn more about Walker’s research on her profile page.

McGuire says the earlier gender is addressed with children, the better

Professor Jenifer McGuire In a MinnPost article, Department of Family Social Science associate professor Jenifer McGuire stressed the importance of an inclusive approach when it comes to gender, and said the sooner we can talk to children regarding gender, the better.

Read the article here.

Learn more about McGuire and her research interests here.

The key to effectively blending families? “Intentional parenting,” Doherty says in WSJ article.

Professor Bill DohertyIn a Wall Street Journal article, Department of Family Social Science professor Bill Doherty discussed the necessity for having a plan when it comes to parenting children in blended families.

Read the article here.

Learn more about Doherty and his projects here. 

Harris shares coping strategies for children dealing with divorcing parents

HarrisSteve150In a US News and World Report article, Department of Family Social Science professor Steve Harris stressed the importance of preserving children’s mental health as parents divorce, and shared coping strategies for divorcing parents hoping to avoid long-term emotional effects on their children.

Read the article here. Also, read about the Minnesota Couples on the Brink project.

Recently published ebook examines how digital stories enhance teaching and learning

The_Changing_Story_Book-Jacket-CoverThe Changing Story: Digital Stories that Participate in Transforming Teaching and Learning is available for download now. Developed by PsTL’s Linda Buturian over the last three years with CEHD’s Susan Andre and Thomas Nechodomu, the ebook examines how digital story assignments encourage students to deeply engage with subjects, and create a stronger sense of ownership of their academic work.

The Changing Story provides educators with assignments, resources, and examples to use in teaching and learning. It also assists educators in examining ways digital stories can be used in current teaching practices to help students harness the power of visual storytelling.

Access a downloadable, free copy of the ebook here: The Changing Story.

The Open Textbook Experience: A national presentation on open educational resources

DuranczykI-2012Irene Duranczyk, associate professor in PsTL, made an “ignite” presentation at the American Mathematical Association of Two Year Colleges (AMATYC) annual conference in New Orleans on Friday, Nov. 20 on the research and need for open educational resources and creative commons text. This is an equity issue. At the conference,  Duranczyk was also the State Delegate to the Annual Delegate Assembly of AMATYC held on Saturday. As the central region coordinator for the Research in Mathematics Education for Two Year Colleges (RMETYC), she attended the executive committee meeting and was present for the committee sponsored research presentations.

Serving as a peer study group facilitator: Catalyst for vocation exploration of a teaching career.

David Arendale, associate professor in PsTL, and Amanada Hane, his former graduate assistant, had another manuscript published from their qualitative study of UMN peer study group facilitators. It will be featured in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Developmental Education published by the National Center for Developmental Education. While there have been previous reports that some former study group leaders considered careers in education as a result of their experience, this is the first article that linked the behavior with vocational choice theory to help explain this outcome. Ms. Hane has an MS in Human Development and Family Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an MA in Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. She currently works at Wilder Research in Saint Paul, Minnesota and conducts community-based research and evaluation in the human services field.

First Year Inquiry Students Visit MIA

​First-year students from Kris Cory and Margaret Kelly’s First Year Inquiry course visit the MIA for a tour based on David Treur's Rez Life.
​First-year students from Kris Cory and Margaret Kelly’s First Year Inquiry course visit the MIA for a tour based on David Treur’s Rez Life.

As part of CEHD Reads, students in the First Year Inquiry (FYI) class visited the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) for a guided tour related to this year’s Common Book, Rez Life.

After reading the book, MIA volunteer docents select art works to view and discuss, framing the conversation around themes explored in Rez Life, also chosen as the MIA’s December book club selection.

During one tour, students examined Warrior with Shield by Henry Moore and reflected on the pride and dignity conveyed by the bronze statue of a wounded warrior, connecting it the dignity of indigenous people. While viewing The Intrigue, a painting by James Ensor, the docent explained the scandal created by the mixed race engagement of Ensor’s sister. In retaliation, Ensor portrays the town gossips hiding behind masks. The painting sparked a discussion about racial intolerance and the figurative masks people adopt to disguise their beliefs and emotions.

MIA docent

 

In the portrait, Little Crow, by Henry Cross, the artist depicts the Chief of the Mdewakanton Dakota dressed in a suit, tie and flowing red cape. Students questioned the painter’s disregard for Little Crow’s heritage, choosing to attire him in “white man’s clothing.” The docent explained this was Little Crow’s desire and accurately portrayed him during a time in his life when he tried to assimilate to white culture.

For some students, this was their first experience at the MIA and many expressed a desire to return. The docent’s selections offered a glimpse of the museum’s treasures and opened another path of inquiry for students to explore.