Category Archives: Research

Wade to give talk at University of Georgia

On February 17, 2017, Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, will speak at the College of Education, University of Georgia, as part of their Research Colloquium Series.

In his talk, “Does theorizing about Developmental Coordination Disorder inform diagnosis and intervention?”, Dr. Wade will comment on the empirical data and conclusions as to the possible cause of developmental coordination disorder. He argues that the data for an information theory explanation is not compelling, and a reconsideration of developmental coordination disorder from a dynamical systems perspective is perhaps more promising.

Stoffregen appointed to Gait & Posture board

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has accepted an appointment to the editorial board for Gait & Posture, one of the pre-eminent journals in the field of Movement Science. The journal is a vehicle for the publication of up-to-date basic and clinical research on all aspects of locomotion and balance.

Gait & Posture has a 1-year Impact Factor of 2.286, and a 5-Year Impact Factor of 2.864.

Kihl and collegeaues serve as guest editors for special issue on corruption in sport

KihllL-prefLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues James Skinner, MBA, Ph.D. (Loughborough University-London) and Terry Engelberg-Moston, Ph.D. (James Cook University-Australia) served as guest editors for the Special Issue – Corruption in sport: Understanding the complexity of corruption in European Sport Management Quarterly.

In addition, to serving as guest editors, Kihl and colleagues wrote an introductory piece emphasizing how the special issue increases our understanding of the complexity and multidimensional nature of sport corruption through examining integrity and different causes of match fixing.

The entire piece can be read online: “Corruption in sport: Understanding the complexity of corruption“.

Wiese-Bjornstal will present at Florida State University’s SPEAR conference

Wiese-BjornstalD-2015On February 9, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab,  will be the keynote speaker at  Florida State University’s Sport Professionals’ Experience and Research (SPEAR) conference hosted by the student-led graduate organization, Sport Psychology Organization & Research Team (SPORT). Dr. Wiese-Bjornstal will be giving two invited lectures about evidence-based research and evidence-based practice in sports medicine psychology.

Wiese-Bjornstal, alumna Russell, publish in SAGE Research Methods

Wiese-Bjornstal
Russell

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and Ph.D. alumna Hayley Russell, ’14, have published a research methods case study in SAGE Research Methods Cases. Russell is an assistant professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN. The case is titled “A Narrative Approach to Understanding Psychological Stories of Overuse Injuries Among Long-Distance Runners,” and it investigates the experiences of athletes with overuse injuries, specifically long-distance runners, by means of a narrative methodology.

Read the full study here.

 

Stoffregen to publish in Ecological Psychology

StoffregenT_2015A study by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), along with Bruno Mantel and Benoit G. Bardy, has been accepted for publication in Ecological Psychology. The article is titled “The senses considered as one perceptual system.”

While peer-reviewed, the article was invited as part of a special issue commemorating the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems, by James J. Gibson, one of the foundational statements of the Ecological Approach to Perception and Action.

Dr. Mantel is on the faculty at the University of Caen, while Dr. Bardy is on the faculty at the University of Montpellier, both in France.

InsideHigherEd cites just-released Tucker Center Women Coaches Report

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageAn article appearing on the InsideHigherEd online site, “Report: Hiring of Women’s Coaches Stagnates,” features a Tucker Center newly released report, “Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Select NCAA Division-I Institutions, 2016-17.” The report, one of several in the fifth year of the series, is authored by Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology faculty Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. The InsideHigherEd piece focuses on both the lack of decline but also the continued underrepresentation of women coaches of women’s sports in the collegiate arena.

LaVoi, Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report Card featured on espnW

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageThe Tucker Center‘s “Women Coaches Research Series & Report Card,” authored by co-director and School of Kinesiology faculty Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, is featured in an online espnW article, “Tucker Center report: Number of women college coaches still not making the grade.” The report is quoted multiple times within the article, discussing the impact women coaches have on the diversity and culture of sports.

Gao and Lee publish paper in Computers in Human Behavior


Zan Gao, Ph.D
.
, associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and Director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab, recently published a paper in Computers in Human Behavior. The first author, Jung Eun Lee, is Dr. Gao’s Ph.D. student and currently an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

The paper examined the acute effect of playing a single bout of active video games on children’s mood change and whether mood change differed by gender and age group. The researchers found that a short bout of active video games significantly reduced anger, depression and vigor, and fourth grade children had greater vigor than the third graders.

Lee, J., Xiang, P., & Gao, Z. (2017). Acute effect of active video games on older children’s mood change. Computers in Human Behavior, 70, 97-103. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.12.060 (impact factor: 2.69)

FSOS Ph.D. student awarded grant

FSOS Ph.D. student Renada Goldberg was recently awarded a grant from the Minneapolis Foundation. Renada will work with the Center on Women, Gender, and Public Policy to conduct a community-based participatory research project in partnership with African American parents, caregivers, and leaders of nonprofits to study and ultimately help shape state and municipal public policies such as the new paid leave policy in Minneapolis.

Inoue to publish in Journal of Business Research

A research paper by Yuhei Inoue,  Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Business Research.The study, titled “Predicting behavioral loyalty through corporate social responsibility: The mediating role of involvement and commitment“, examined whether consumers’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities can predict behavioral loyalty, and how attitudinal constructs mediate this relationship. A field study of 634 customers of an Australian professional football team was conducted by combining attitudinal surveys with actual behavioral data collected one year later. The study’s findings indicate that the contribution of CSR initiatives to behavioral loyalty is not as robust as past research suggests, and is contingent upon specific psychological states activated by consumers’ perceptions of such initiatives.

Citation of this article: Inoue, Y., Funk, D.C., & McDonald, H. (in press). Predicting behavioral loyalty through corporate social responsibility: The mediating role of involvement and commitment. Journal of Business Research.

Konczak publishes in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

Konczak-2012Together with colleagues from Italy and Singapore, Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Lab,  published a paper that presents a new method to measure proprioception in children. Francesca Marini, a doctoral student at the Italian Institute of Technology, is the first author of the article, “Robot-aided developmental assessment of wrist proprioception in children.

Neurodevelopmental disorders and brain injuries in children have been associated with proprioceptive dysfunctions that will negatively affect their movements. Unfortunately, the knowledge of how proprioception evolves in typically developing children is still sparse due to the lack of reliable clinical examination protocols.

Sullivan helps MAP Equity Assistance Center provide schools with professional development, technical assistance

Amanda Sullivan

Amanda Sullivan, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology’s school psychology program, is one of several Equity Fellows assisting the new Midwest and Plans (MAP) Equity Assistance Center in providing professional development and technical assistance to regional school systems.

The MAP Center was recently awarded a five year grant by the U.S. Department of Education to assist with desegregation and other civil rights issues in public schools in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Sullivan will contribute to the development of MAP products and services to facilitate implementation of culturally appropriate multitier systems of support for students’ academic, social-emotional, and behavioral development.

“I’m excited to partner with the MAP Center to support schools’ efforts to create equitable systems and support the learning and wellbeing of all learners,” she says. “This is as important now as it’s ever been and with the MAP center, we have a great opportunity to develop tools tailored to our local communities.”

DeJaeghere conducted RISE-Vietnam research interviews with national policymakers

Joan DeJaeghere, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD) and co-principal investigator of the Research for Improving Education Systems in Vietnam (RISE), conducted interviews with national policymakers in January.  The research will be analyzed to understand the political-economic changes that affected Vietnamese educational successes and challenges.  One of the unique features the research aims to understand is how policies were implemented throughout the country and at local levels during a process of decentralization and “democratization” that allowed for a large expansion of educational participation and learning, while also maintaining a strong socialist ethos and commitment to equality.

Read more about RISE, a 6-year, $5.2 million research project about children’s learning throughout the world.

LaVoi quoted in online publication row2k

Dr. Nicole M. LaVoiAn article in the online publication row2k takes on the issue of the number of women in head coaching positions in collegiate rowing programs. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is quoted on her research in the Tucker Center Report Card on women head coaches in collegiate sports, which shows that rowing has even fewer head coaches than many other women’s sports. LaVoi says:

“There really aren’t many women coaches in the big programs. We have record numbers of women participating in rowing, but we don’t see that translating into women coaching in rowing, and that’s a little concerning.”

Read the full story here.

Stoffregen quoted in Australian ABC News

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), is quoted in the Science News section of ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). In the article, he discusses seasickness and how to prevent it, based on his research on motion sickness and postural sway.

Read the full article here.

Kendeou presents at symposium on reducing impact of misinformation, fake news

Dr. Panayiota Kendeou

Panayiota Kendeou, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology’s Psychological Foundations of Education program, recently traveled to Sydney, Australia, to present her work on the 12th biennial meeting of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC). Kendeou was part of a featured symposium–organized by two world-renowned experts on misinformation,  Ullrich Ecker (The University of Western Australia) and Stephan Lewandowsky (University of Bristol)–on research advances that reduce the impact of misinformation and fake news. At the event, Kendeou presented her work on the conditions that promote successful change of pre-existing beliefs in the context of her Knowledge Revision Components framework (KReC; Kendeou & O’Brien, 2014).

Dedicated to encouraging and promoting quality scientific research in applied domains, the SARMAC’s purpose is to enhance collaboration and co-operation between basic and applied researchers in memory and cognition.

Learn more about this and other work conducted in Kendeou’s Reading & Language lab.

Frayeh and Lewis publish in International Journal of Exercise Science

Former School of Kinesiology doctoral student Amanda Frayeh Ph.D., now assistant professor for sport studies at Lock Haven University, published a research article titled Sport Commitment Among Adult Recreational Soccer Players: Test of an Expanded Model” in the International Journal of Exercise ScienceCo-author of the article is Amanda’s former adviser Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology.

The study expanded versions of an existing research model to explore psychosocial factors related to adults’ participation in recreational team sport. The purpose is to demonstrate that sport commitment is related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Article by Wahlstrom regarding late start time for teens featured in Kappan magazine

An article by Kyla Wahlstrom, lecturer and senior research fellow in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), is the cover story of the December issue of Kappan magazine, which is a publication of Phi Delta Kappa, a leading professional organization for educators. See the story, “Later start time for teens improves grades, mood, and safety.” Wahlstrom has been researching the outcomes of later high school starting times on teens for 20 years, and this story reports on the largest study ever done on the topic.

Stoffregen co-authors article in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

StoffregenT_2015The research study “Perceiving nested affordances for another person’s actions” co-authored by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has been accepted for publication in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.

The other co-authors are:

  • Dr. Jeffrey Wagman, Illinois State University
  • Jiuyang Bai, Ph.D. Student at Illinois State University
  • Daniel Schloesser, Masters Student at Illinois State University