Category Archives: Research

Dengel speaks at Hamline University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Hamline University, Biology Department on November 10. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Pediatric Vascular Health: Growing Up.”

Dengel gives talk at University of Maryland

On November 15, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Obesity and Pediatric Vascular Dysfunction: What are the Solutions?”

 

Raymond-Pope, Dengel, and Bosch publish in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Kinesiology doctoral student Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on an article written with kinesiology professor Donald Dengel, Ph.D., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., and published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 

The article, “Total and Segmental Body Composition Examination in Collegiate Football Players Using Multifrequency Bia and Dxa,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between two different means of measurement used in assessing total and segmental percent body fat.

Raymond-Pope is currently advised by Dengel, and Bosch is a former advisee who graduated with his Ph.D. in kinesiology in 2014. Dengel is the director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology in the School of Kinesiology.

 

Stoffregen publishes with colleagues in PLOS ONE

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) published the article “Effects of decades of physical driving on body movement and motion sickness during virtual driving”  in PLOS ONE, one of the premiere peer-reviewed open access scientific journals.

Co-authors are Chui-Hui Chang, Fu-Chen Chen, and Wei-Jhong Zeng, all researchers at the Department of Physical Education at the National Kaohsiung Normal University in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Chui-Hui Chang and Fu-Chen Chen received their Ph.D. in kinesiology from the University of Minnesota, where they were co-advised by Dr. Michael Wade and Stoffregen.

NIH awards grant to Konczak lab to develop technology for treating a voice disorder

Jürgen Konczk, Ph.D.
Arash Mahnan, Ph.D. student

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology is the principal investigator on an NIH funded grant program administered through the University’s Office of Discovery and Translation that seeks to promote new therapies for rare diseases. The project will design and build a device that will improve the symptoms of a voice disorder called spasmodic dysphonia (SD).

People with SD experience involuntary spasms of the laryngeal musculature that leads to a strained or choked speech. There is no cure for the disease and speech therapy is ineffective. The device will alter how it feels when one speaks. The idea behind the technology is that this sensory trick will help patients to improve their voice quality.  The device development and its testing will be conducted in Konczak’s Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory.

Arash Mahnan, biomedical engineer and doctoral student in the HSC lab will serve as primary research assistant for this project.

 

Dengel publishes in Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is lead author of an article published in the journal Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article entitled “Reproducibility of blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes with end-tidal carbon dioxide alterations” examines the reproducibility of a new method to measure cerebral vascular reactivity using blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes in response to alterations in end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure during magnetic resonance imaging.

The methodology developed by this research establishes an accurate method for measuring blood vessel function in the brain, which may be used not only in
the comparison between various groups of individuals but also in longitudinal studies interested in treatment or examination of CVR over time (i.e., aging studies, traumatic brain injury evaluation).

 

Dengel gives talk at Winona State University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Winona State University, Department of Health, Exercise, and Rehabilitative Sciences on November 1, 2017.

The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “The A, B, C’s of Graduate School.”

Kinesiology undergraduate Elisheva Savvateev receives UROP award

Elisheva Savvateev, an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Thomas Stoffregen, Ph. D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, supervises her project, “The driver passenger effect in head mounted virtual reality.” Continue reading

Konczak gives lecture at Mini Medical School

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory in the School of Kinesiology, presented October 30 at the Academic Health Center’s Mini Medical School as part of their Fall 2017 series, “Medical Mysteries: Navigating Complex Health Cases.” His presentation with George S. Goding, Jr., M.D., professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, was titled “Finding a new treatment for the incurable voice disorder Spasmodic Dysphonia.” Konczak and Goding have been working with colleagues from Speech and Hearing Sciences and Engineering on a new treatment approach to improve the voice symptoms of patients with this voice disorder. Currently, there is no cure for the disease, though patients can get temporary relief through Botulinum toxin injections.

Comments from attendees after the presentation included:

This work gives me so much hope – what an interesting study!
Very interesting topic, more education on these topics is necessary so I am glad I was able to hear this presentation. Appreciated the presentation from both Dr’s because of the overlap!
Nicely simplified from complex information. Nice to hear U of M people are working together to make life better for those in need.
Loved the comment about calling around the U to find experts to help solve problems. There is so much happening at the U of M!!

Mini Medical School is a five-week program offered each semester that is designed to give individuals with a shared interest in health sciences the opportunity to examine the scientific foundations of health and disease presented by internationally renowned U of M experts who are shaping the way health care is delivered locally and globally.

Study on pre-kindergarten program shows strategies for reducing the achievement gap

A new study shows that successful implementation of preschool-to-third-grade programs yields benefits in increasing school readiness, improving attendance, and strengthening parental involvement in school education—strategies that can close the achievement gap for children at risk.

“Scaling and sustaining effective early childhood programs through school–family–university collaboration” was published in the September/October 2017 issue of Child Development by Arthur Reynolds, professor of child development, and colleagues in the Human Capital Research Collaborative (HCRC).

The Child–Parent Center Preschool to Third Grade program (CPC P–3) is a collaborative school reform model designed to improve school achievement and family engagement from ages three to nine. The program provides small classes, intensive learning experiences, menu-based parent involvement, and professional development in co-located sites. In the study, investigators evaluated evidence from two longitudinal studies, the Chicago Longitudinal Study, begun in the 1980s, and Midwest CPC, which started in Minnesota and Illinois in 2012.

“We found that organizing preschool to third grade services through partnerships with schools and families creates a strong learning environment for ensuring that early childhood gains are sustained, thus reducing the achievement gap,” said Reynolds, HCRC co-director.

Implementation in five Saint Paul Public Schools serving high proportions of dual language learners led to gains in literacy of nearly a half a year at the end of preschool. The gains were sustained in kindergarten with further evidence of increased parent involvement and attendance. Small classes and engaged instruction contributed to these gains.

“Thanks to the support of the CPC P-3 program, family rooms at the five Saint Paul Public School sites are vibrant and welcoming environments,” said Kathleen Wilcox-Harris, chief academic officer of the Saint Paul Public School District. “It is not uncommon to see a hub of activity in these spaces promoting the bridge between the home, community, and school environments. The program with guidance from HCRC has led to a menu of family engagement opportunities known as the Families First Menu of Opportunities that is being implemented at other sites. The small classes and preschool to third grade alignment of instruction has also been of substantial benefit.”

In collaboration with Saint Paul Public Schools and other implementation sites, guiding principles of the effectiveness of program expansion are shared ownership, committed resources, and progress monitoring for improvement. The addition of Pay for Success financing in the Chicago Public School District shows the feasibility of scaling CPC P-3 while continuing to improve effectiveness. Each dollar invested in the CPC P-3 program has demonstrated a return of $10 in reduced need for remedial services and improved well-being.

Findings from the study support increased investment during the early grades. As Reynolds documented in a recent Education Week commentary, spending on early childhood development in the first decade of life is a smart investment.

“Since only about half of young children are enrolled in public preK programs, and less than 10 percent participate in P–3 programs that follow the key principles of CPC, increased access to high-quality education and family support services can make a big difference in reducing the achievement gap,” Reynolds said. “Nationally, only one third of fourth graders read proficiently on national assessments, and preschool or school-age programs alone are not enough to raise these rates to acceptable levels, especially for the most vulnerable children. CPC not only helps children be school ready, but improves reading and math proficiency over the school grades, which led to higher rates of graduation and ultimately greater economic well-being.”

Human Capital Research Collaborative, an interdisciplinary research institute in the Institute of Child Development, College of Education and Human Development, offers a multitude of resources for CPC P-3 implementation, including monitoring tools, manuals, and extensive resources on the website CPCP3.org.

Funding for the study is from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, U. S. Department of Education, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Ji spends productive sabbatical month at University of Valencia, Spain

Dr. Ji and Dr. Viña

Li Li Ji, Ph.D., professor and director of the LPHES in the School of Kinesiology, has finished a one-month visit to the University of Valencia, Spain, as part of his planned sabbatical activity. During his stay, he met with the University’s Faculty of Medicine led by Dr. Josè Viña, and with Dr. Carmen Gomez, a visiting scholar in LPHES last summer, to discuss continuing collaborations on research in the field of muscle biology and aging.

Ji gave two presentations to UV faculty, titled “Mechanism and prevention of muscle disuse atrophy via DNA transfection” and “Oat phytochemicals: Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.” The University of Valencia Medical College is a highly respected institution in Europe, and its former dean, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1906. Ji’s visiting professorship was sponsored by a grant from the European Union.

Kinesiology graduate students  Kronzer, Wood, and White to present at AASP Conference

Current School of Kinesiology and Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory graduate students Joey Kronzer (M.S.), Kristin Wood (Ph.D.), and Andrew White (Ph.D.) will be presenting their research at the upcoming Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) annual conference in Orlando, Fl, on October 18th–21st.

  • Kronzer will be giving a 15-minute talk titled “Using E-Prime 2.0 to Develop Sport-Specific Video Analysis Training Protocols.
  • Wood will be presenting a paper titled “Analyzing the Effectiveness of an Injury Education Program in Increasing Novice Marathoners’ Self-Efficacy in Adopting Proper Injury Management Strategies.
  • White will be presenting a paper titled “Breadth or depth? Evaluating psychological, performance, and injury outcomes following multidimensional or focused mental skills training in marathoners.

All three students are advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab.

Joey Kronzer
Andrew White
Kristin Wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dengel co-investigator on newly funded grant

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is a co-investigator on a grant funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

The 3-year grant titled “Hypoglycemia After Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes: Intranasal Naloxone As A Novel Therapy To Preserve Hypoglycemia Counterregulation” will examine the effects of intranasal naloxone to preserve normal blood glucose levels during aerobic exercise in type 1 diabetics.

Gao publishes book chapter in Traditional Chinese physical activities

Konczak gives invited presentation at European workshop

On October 10, Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, presented a lecture on robotic rehabilitation to the PACE network community in Genova, Italy.

PACE stands for Perception and Action in Complex Environments. The network is funded by the European Union and seeks to train predoctoral students with a background in engineering, mathematics, neuroscience, and psychology.

 

Tucker Center research cited in Salt Lake Tribune piece on Cam Newton remark

Tucker Center research is cited in a Salt Lake Tribune article, “‘Sports don’t have a gender’: Utah women’s tackle football players respond to Cam Newton.” Newton’s remark was: “It’s funny to hear a female talk about [running football] routes.”

 

Gao and advisees publish in Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy

Stoffregen gives invited talk at National Academy of Kinesiology meeting

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), gave an invited talk at the 87th annual meeting of the National Academy of Kinesiology in Washington, DC, on September 16. His presentation was titled “Ecological physics and the perceptual information for motor control.

 

Kihl presents research at the European Association for Sport Management Conference

Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, attended and presented at the European Association for Sport Management held September 5-8 in Bern, Switzerland.

The title of Dr. Kihl’s presentation was “Examining the Dimensions of Athlete Representation in Sport Governance”. Vicki D. Schull, Ph.D., a 2014 graduate of the School of Kinesiology and current assistant professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and Caroline Heffernan, Ph.D. candidate were co-authors on the presentation.

Dengel and colleagues publish findings of childhood cancer survivor study

Donald Dengel, Ph.D.
Marlatt Kara, Ph.D.

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, published with colleagues in the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

Dengel’s former graduate student Marlatt Kara, Ph.D., now a postdoctoral researcher at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, LA, is the lead author of the article titled “The Effect of Atorvastatin on Vascular Function and Structure in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Clinical Trial.” This pilot study examines the development of cardiovascular disease in childhood cancer survivors.

Co-author Aaron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Minnesota, also received his doctoral degree in the School of Kinesiology.