Category Archives: Research

C&I Ph.D. student, Joubert, receives Interdisciplinary Dissertation Development award

Ezekiel Joubert, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction received the Interdisciplinary Dissertation Development scholarship from the Institute of Advanced Studies to support his dissertation research. The program is designed to give University of Minnesota graduate students in the social science and humanities fields the opportunity to workshop, test, and begin the proposal writing process.

Joubert’s dissertation looks at the effects of economic migration on black Americans and what role educational opportunity played in altering the routes of the descendants of the Great Migration. Joubert’s family was part of the Great Migration that settled in Southeastern Michigan in a small cluster of rural and semi-rural townships and small cities forged by industrialization and transformed by black migrants in search of economic opportunities and safety from the Jim Crow South. Years later, this area experienced a wave of intrastate migration due to deindustrialization and disinvestment in cities such as Detroit.

“As a descendant of the Great Migration and a child of parents who left Detroit, I noticed a number of challenges facing these black residents: increasing concerns over contaminated land and water, a loss of economic opportunity in semi-rural or rural areas and most important to my study, public school closures and mergers and school of choice which has forced families to choose between traveling long distances to get their children to school or to uproot their families completely,” Joubert said, which helped him focus his research of understanding the effects of requiring students, particularly children of color, to involuntary and voluntary cross racial, economic, political, and regional borders.

Joubert is advised by associate professor Tim Lensmire.

Learn more about the Ph.D. program in Culture and Teaching in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Gao serves as guest editor for special issue of Journal of Sport and Health Science

Zan Gao, Ph.D., Kinesiology associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, recently served as the Guest Editor for a special issue of Journal of Sport and Health Science titled “Promoting Physical Activity and Health through Exergaming.”

The purpose of this special topic is to investigate the effects of exergaming on individuals’ energy expenditure, physical activity participation, sedentary behaviors, actual and perceived motor skills, activity choices, behavioral changes and psychosocial beliefs through experimental and quasi-experimental designs. The special issue includes a total of four original articles, one review article, one editorial, and one commentary piece contributed by research scientists in the USA, Australia, France, and Belgium. The special issue is available at this link.

Neil Hultgren, Kin M.S., wins second place in Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition

Neil Hultgren, Kinesiology M.S. student advised by Donald Dengel, Ph.D., director of  the  Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, took second place in the Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition at the University of Minnesota’s 31st Annual Pediatric Research, Education and Scholarship Symposium (PRESS) on April 14, 2017. Neil’s poster presentation was titled: “Central Blood Pressure Regulation in Relation to Hypertension and Adiposity in Youth.” The research is part of Neil’s master’s thesis.

Ed Psych researchers present on misinformation surrounding ASD

Despite the facts, people across the world hold different beliefs about what causes autism spectrum disorder (ASD). On March 31, faculty and researchers from the Department of Educational Psychology shared findings from a recent “glocal” (locally based with global components) study on the misinformation that surrounds ASD.

Panayiota Kendeou, Guy Bond Chair in Reading and associate professor in the psychological foundations of education program, kicked off the event with an introduction into the cognitive theory behind “Reducing the Impact of Misinformation around ASD.” She explained the misinformation effect and her Knowledge Revision Components Framework (KrEC) which examines the incremental steps of knowledge revision.Watch Kendeou’s presentation.

Gregory Trevors, post-doctoral fellow in the psychological foundations of education program, provided additional background, presenting local and global data from the study on “The Public’s Prior Knowledge about the Causes of ASD and its Relations to Treatment Recommendation.” Watch Trevor’s presentation.

Veronica Fleury, assistant professor and ASD licensure & M.Ed. coordinator in the special education program, presented findings from the local portion of the study conducted at the Minnesota State fair, specifically examining “The Impact of (source) Credibility on Treatment Recommendations.” Watch Fleury’s presentation.

Finally, Krista Muis, associate professor in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology at McGill University, provided an outside perspective on why the Global Signature Program is important. Muis, who studies how individuals process complex, contradictory content on socio-scientific issues such as vaccinations, noted the strengths of the research project. She also posed a few questions about the local portion of study and provided recommendations for future global research on the topic. Watch Muis’ presentation.

The event ended with a discussion that will help inform the content for future coursework, including a study abroad course focused on understanding ASD with an emphasis on debunking global misinformation.

The signature program is funded by the Office of International Initiatives and Relations at the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD).

  1. Kendeou, P., & O’Brien, E. J. (2014). The Knowledge Revision Components (KReC) Framework: Processes and Mechanisms. In D. Rapp, & J. Braasch (Eds.), Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences Cambridge: MIT.

Lewis presents two research projects at San Diego conference

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, presented twice at the 38th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Diego, CA., in March 2017.

The research projects Dr. Lewis presented are “Feasibility and efficacy of a physical activity intervention for the prevention of postpartum depression: A randomized trial.” (Lewis, B. A., Schuver, K., Gjerdingen, D., Terrell, C., & Avery, M. ) and “The future of physical activity intervention research: Expanding focus to sedentary behavior, technology, and dissemination.” (Lewis, B.A., Napolitano, M.A., Buman, M., Williams, D.M., Nigg, C.R.).

Kendeou presents at Northwestern University on debunking misinformation

Panayiota Kendeou

Panayiota (Pani) Kendeou, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Guy Bond Chair in Reading, recently presented to the Multi-disciplinary Program in Learning Sciences at Northwestern University on the “Science of Debunking Misinformation.”

In the talk, Kendeou discussed a series of studies that examine the incremental steps of knowledge revision, detailing its time course and mechanisms during reading comprehension in the context of the Knowledge Revision Components framework (KReC).1 She explained how KReC—which she developed with Professor Edward J O’Brien at the University of New Hampshire—aligns itself nicely with knowledge revision in the context of reading comprehension and has implications for research in text comprehension, conceptual change, persuasion, and the misinformation effect.

Get more information on Kendeou’s research by visiting her Reading & Language Lab.

  1. Kendeou, P., & O’Brien, E. J. (2014). The Knowledge Revision Components (KReC) Framework: Processes and Mechanisms. In D. Rapp, & J. Braasch (Eds.), Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences Cambridge: MIT.

Stoffregen discusses motion sickness research in To See the Sea

An online publication for the cruising set, To See the Sea, features an interview with Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and researcher on motion sickness. Stoffregen discusses his fascination as a boy in the 1960s with astronauts and space travel, including the phenomenon of motion sickness (which afflicts many astronauts in space), and how it led him to the research he is doing today.

The podcast and written transcript are available at tps://toseethesea.com/index.php/interviews/.

Stoffregen interviewed by online publication PsyPost

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perceptual-Action Laboratory, was interviewed by the online publication PsyPost on his research relating to the virtual reality headset Oculus Rift. His study, conducted with Kinesiology Ph.D. student Justin Munafo and U of M undergraduate honors student Meg Diedrick, indicates that using the headset can cause motion sickness, and that women are more likely to experience this effect than men.  Stoffregen says, “As interactive devices increasingly pervade the lives of ordinary people, motion sickness related to these technologies becomes more and more common. The problem is getting worse, not better.” 

The article is available here.

 

New York Times cites Tucker Center Women Coaches Report data

In reviewing the status of women in college coaching the New York Times article, “Number of Women Coaching in College Has Plummeted in Title IX Era,” cites the Tucker Center’s most recent Women in College Coaching Series report, “Head coaches of women’s collegiate teams: A report on select NCAA Division-I institutions, 2016-17.”

Weiss and Former Students Receive Outstanding Research Writing Award

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues and former students Nicole Bolter (PhD, 2010, UMN) and Lindsay Kipp (PhD, 2012, UMN), are recipients of the Outstanding Research Writing Award for their article published in Volume 87 of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES). The Research Council of the Society for Health and Physical Education (SHAPE) recognized the authors at their annual meeting on March 16. This award identifies one article in each yearly volume of RQES that characterizes an outstanding contribution of scholarship and writing quality from among all manuscripts published that year. This is the seventh time that Weiss has personally been recognized with this scholarly writing award.

Dr. Weiss (left), Dr. Bolter (center), and Dr. Kipp (right)

The full citation is, Weiss, M. R., Bolter, N. D., & Kipp, L. E. (2016). Evaluation of The First Tee in Promoting Positive Youth Development: Group Comparisons and Longitudinal Trends. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 87, 271-283.

Here is a brief abstract: Purpose: This manuscript represents the third in a series documenting our longitudinal evaluation of The First Tee, a physical activity-based youth development program that uses golf as a vehicle for teaching life skills and enhancing developmental outcomes. Previous phases of our project: (a) established initial data-based evidence of effectiveness through cross-sectional and qualitative methods (Weiss et al., 2013), and (b) provided validity and reliability for a measure of life skills transfer in three studies using mixed methods (Weiss et al., 2014). The purpose of the present phase was to: (a) compare youth in The First Tee to youth in other activities on life skills transfer and developmental outcomes, and (b) examine change and stability over three years in life skills transfer among youth in The First Tee. Method: In Study 1, youth participating in The First Tee (N = 405) and a comparison group (N = 159) completed measures of key constructs. In Study 2, a longitudinal sample of 192 youth participating in The First Tee completed the life skills transfer measure for three consecutive years. Results: Study 1 revealed that youth in The First Tee compared favorably to youth in other activities on 5 of 8 life skills and 6 of 8 developmental outcomes, and Study 2 showed that scores improved or remained stable for life skills transfer over time. Conclusion: Results from both studies show that The First Tee is effective in teaching for transfer of life skills and promoting developmental outcomes.

April 7 rebroadcasts of Tucker Center “Concussions and Female Athletes” video

The Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to announce several rebroadcasts this April of its groundbreaking video, “Concussions and Female Athletes.”

tptMN Statewide Digital MN Channel
Fri 7 April @ 2:00 am
Fri 7 April @ 8:00 pm

Through the personal stories and experiences of coaches, athletes and their families, as well as in-depth interviews with nationally recognized scholars and medical experts, this documentary examines the causes underlying concussion and offers practical solutions to help prevent and treat sports-related concussion injuries in female athletes.

To view the entire program online now, click here. For more information on upcoming broadcasts, click here.

C&I student receives collaborative research grant from the Institute for Advanced Study

Ezekiel Joubert, a Ph.D. candidate in Culture and Teaching in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, has received a grant from the Institute for Advanced Study as part of an interdisciplinary Research and Creative Collaborative, “Historical Injustices: The Working Group.”

The IAS is a University-wide interdisciplinary center, and a resource for scholars, artists, professionals, and students who are engaged in a wide variety of study and practice. It also serves as a bridge between the University and the wider community as a place where people meet and ideas are exchanged.

The Historical Injustices Working Group also includes Yuichiro Onishi from the Department of African American & African Studies, Catherine Squires from the Department of Communication Studies, Hana Maruyama from the Department of American Studies and John Matsunaga from Asian American Studies. “We are interested in tracing the University of Minnesota’s ties to both slavery and Japanese wartime resettlement,” says Joubert. “In particular, I am looking at developing a curriculum based on our research.”

Joubert also notes that the working group is hoping to tie their research findings to the movement of slaves up and down the Mississippi river. “Part of project is to increase students’ of color engagement in the river itself,” says Joubert, adding that all school-aged children in Minnesota study African American history as part of the curriculum and ethnic studies are now offered as an elective in the state of Minnesota where he sees the curriculum he is developing as a good fit.

“Almost all universities have an invisible history related to colonialism and racial injustice,” says Joubert. “Whether it was the removal of indigineous people off lands or racial injustices related to civil rights.” He adds that he hopes the Historical Injustices Working Group can shed light on some of these issues.

Find out more about the research degrees offered in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

 

Kihl and colleague to publish in Business & Society Review

KihllL-prefAssociate professor Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, and her colleague, Dr. Kathy Babiak (University of Michigan) have had their paper titled, “A blueprint for CSR engagement: Identifying stakeholder expectations and attitudes of a community relations program,” accepted for publication in Business & Society Review. The paper examines sport stakeholders’ expectations regarding corporations’ CSR initiatives through dialogue. Kihl and Babiak argue that stakeholder dialogue is an important way for a business to gain perceptions about how it is viewed and evaluated by its stakeholders and underlies subsequent interactions.

Stoffregen featured in latest Science News cover story

The cover story of the March 18 issue of Science News includes the latest research being conducted by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL). Stoffregen is quoted extensively on his work related to virtual reality, motion sickness, and the sex connection.

 

Award-winning book on sport management theory features chapters by Inoue, Kane, and Kihl

Three School of Kinesiology faculty contributed chapters to an award-winning book on sport management theory.

Routledge Handbook of Theory in Sport Management was selected as an Outstanding Academic Title 2016 by CHOICE magazine, published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., and Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., each wrote chapters. This is the first book to trace the intellectual contours of theory in sport management, and to explain, critique and celebrate the importance of sport management theory in academic research, teaching and learning, and in the development of professional practice.

Inoue and Kihl contributed to the Managerial Theories section with their chapters, “Developing a Theory of Suffering and Academic Corruption in Sport” (Kihl) and “Applying Strategic CSR in Sport” (Inoue). Kane contributed the chapter “The Continuum Theory: Challenging Traditional Conceptualization and Practices of Sport” in the section Sociocultural Theories. Dr. Kane is director of the School of Kinesiology’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, and Dr. Kihl is an affiliated scholar in the Tucker Center.

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Kim will publish in Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport

Young Ho Kim, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has had a paper accepted for publication in the Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport. The paper, entitled “The Normalization of Sport Corruption and Interdependence of the Factors: Symbiosis of Threefolding’s Organism,” examines 1) how sport corruption is normalized in certain sport organizations and societies, and 2) how sport corruption, through the process of normalization, is produced and reproduced in their organic system. Young is advised by Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., and Rayla Allison, JD.

Stoffregen quoted in ScienceNews

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was interviewed about his research related to motion sickness and virtual reality for the March 18 edition of ScienceNews. A number of researchers believe that sensory mismatch is to blame for the motion sickness that can be present with virtual reality use, but Stoffregen believes that instability is the culprit. The full article can be accessed here.

Stoffregen also is lab director for the School’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory.

Betker and Orr are finalists in CEHD Three Minute Thesis Competition

Morgan Betker
Madeleine Orr

Two Kinesiology doctoral candidates are finalists in CEHD’s Research Day competition, Three Minute Thesis (3MT), which will be held March 28  from 10-11 a.m. in the McNamara Alumni Center Johnson Room.

Morgan Betker (exercise physiology emphasis) and Madeleine Orr (sport management emphasis) will be competing with six doctoral students from across the college for the first prize of $500. Prizes of $250 will go to the runner-up and people’s choice. The finalists were chosen from a preliminary round competition held last week.

Ms. Betker’s presentation is “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers” and Ms. Orr’s presentation is “The rhetoric vs. the reality of sport event legacies.”

3MT is an annual competition held in over 200 universities worldwide. It’s designed to challenge Ph.D. students to present their research in just three minutes in an engaging format that can be understood by an audience with no background in their discipline. The competition is intended to help students develop a presentation on their research and hone their academic communication skills to explain their work effectively to a general audience.

Judges in the CEHD competition are Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African-American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.

Varma, student present research on the origins of numerical abilities to Royal Society

Sashank Varma, associate professor and coordinator for the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, and doctoral student, Soo-hyun Im, recently traveled to London for the Royal Society Meeting on the Origins of Numerical Abilities, a scientific discussion about how when humans acquire numerical competence, we build upon an inherited cognitive foundation. At the meeting, Varma and Im presented their research projects entitled Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students1 and From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis.2

Co-authors of Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement include: Purav Patel, a doctoral student in psychological foundations of education and Rachel Voit, a Macalester College student at the time of data collection and now a masters student in social work.

The Royal Society is a fellowship of many of the world’s most eminent scientists and is the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.

  1.  Varma, S., Voit, R., Im, S.-h., & Patel, P. J. (2017, February). Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.
  1. Im, S.-h., & Varma, S. (2017, February). From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.

Pope awarded $1200 COGS Travel Grant to present at SHAPE America’s national convention 

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has been awarded a $1200 Council of Graduate Students (COGS) Travel Grant to present two posters and give one oral presentation at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention held in Boston March 14-18. Pope is advised by Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory.

COGS is a University-wide student organization that represents, advocates for, and supports graduate students at the U of M. The travel grant supports students who present original work at a conference with a poster, oral presentation, or other acceptable format.  The maximum award is $1200.

While at the SHAPE America Convention, Pope will also be awarded a 2017 Research Council Graduate Student Research Award by SHAPE America for his project, “Validity of Smartwatches in Assessing Energy Expenditure and Heart Rate.”