Category Archives: Research

Stoffregen featured in latest Science News cover story

The cover story of the March 18 issue of Science News includes the latest research being conducted by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL). Stoffregen is quoted extensively on his work related to virtual reality, motion sickness, and the sex connection.

 

Award-winning book on sport management theory features chapters by Inoue, Kane, and Kihl

Three School of Kinesiology faculty contributed chapters to an award-winning book on sport management theory.

Routledge Handbook of Theory in Sport Management was selected as an Outstanding Academic Title 2016 by CHOICE magazine, published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., and Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., each wrote chapters. This is the first book to trace the intellectual contours of theory in sport management, and to explain, critique and celebrate the importance of sport management theory in academic research, teaching and learning, and in the development of professional practice.

Inoue and Kihl contributed to the Managerial Theories section with their chapters, “Developing a Theory of Suffering and Academic Corruption in Sport” (Kihl) and “Applying Strategic CSR in Sport” (Inoue). Kane contributed the chapter “The Continuum Theory: Challenging Traditional Conceptualization and Practices of Sport” in the section Sociocultural Theories. Dr. Kane is director of the School of Kinesiology’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, and Dr. Kihl is an affiliated scholar in the Tucker Center.

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Kim will publish in Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport

Young Ho Kim, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has had a paper accepted for publication in the Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport. The paper, entitled “The Normalization of Sport Corruption and Interdependence of the Factors: Symbiosis of Threefolding’s Organism,” examines 1) how sport corruption is normalized in certain sport organizations and societies, and 2) how sport corruption, through the process of normalization, is produced and reproduced in their organic system. Young is advised by Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., and Rayla Allison, JD.

Stoffregen quoted in ScienceNews

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was interviewed about his research related to motion sickness and virtual reality for the March 18 edition of ScienceNews. A number of researchers believe that sensory mismatch is to blame for the motion sickness that can be present with virtual reality use, but Stoffregen believes that instability is the culprit. The full article can be accessed here.

Stoffregen also is lab director for the School’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory.

Betker and Orr are finalists in CEHD Three Minute Thesis Competition

Morgan Betker
Madeleine Orr

Two Kinesiology doctoral candidates are finalists in CEHD’s Research Day competition, Three Minute Thesis (3MT), which will be held March 28  from 10-11 a.m. in the McNamara Alumni Center Johnson Room.

Morgan Betker (exercise physiology emphasis) and Madeleine Orr (sport management emphasis) will be competing with six doctoral students from across the college for the first prize of $300. Prizes of $250 will go to the runner-up and people’s choice. The finalists were chosen from a preliminary round competition held last week.

Ms. Betker’s presentation is “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers” and Ms. Orr’s presentation is “The rhetoric vs. the reality of sport event legacies.”

3MT is an annual competition held in over 200 universities worldwide. It’s designed to challenge Ph.D. students to present their research in just three minutes in an engaging format that can be understood by an audience with no background in their discipline. The competition is intended to help students develop a presentation on their research and hone their academic communication skills to explain their work effectively to a general audience.

Judges in the CEHD competition are Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosovold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African-American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.

Varma, student present research on the origins of numerical abilities to Royal Society

Sashank Varma, associate professor and coordinator for the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, and doctoral student, Soo-hyun Im, recently traveled to London for the Royal Society Meeting on the Origins of Numerical Abilities, a scientific discussion about how when humans acquire numerical competence, we build upon an inherited cognitive foundation. At the meeting, Varma and Im presented their research projects entitled Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students1 and From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis.2

Co-authors of Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement include: Purav Patel, a doctoral student in psychological foundations of education and Rachel Voit, a Macalester College student at the time of data collection and now a masters student in social work.

The Royal Society is a fellowship of many of the world’s most eminent scientists and is the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.

  1.  Varma, S., Voit, R., Im, S.-h., & Patel, P. J. (2017, February). Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.
  1. Im, S.-h., & Varma, S. (2017, February). From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.

Pope awarded $1200 COGS Travel Grant to present at SHAPE America’s national convention 

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has been awarded a $1200 Council of Graduate Students (COGS) Travel Grant to present two posters and give one oral presentation at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention held in Boston March 14-18. Pope is advised by Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory.

COGS is a University-wide student organization that represents, advocates for, and supports graduate students at the U of M. The travel grant supports students who present original work at a conference with a poster, oral presentation, or other acceptable format.  The maximum award is $1200.

While at the SHAPE America Convention, Pope will also be awarded a 2017 Research Council Graduate Student Research Award by SHAPE America for his project, “Validity of Smartwatches in Assessing Energy Expenditure and Heart Rate.”

Tucker Center research referenced at Women in Sports panel in Chicago

Tucker Center  research on media coverage for women’s sports was cited in an article appearing on The DePaulia online site, “Jean Lenti Posetto and Doug Bruno talk DePaul and women’s sports at symposium.” The symposium, held in Chicago, featured a panel of Chicago-based sports professionals who agreed that they were “tired of continuously fighting for equal female rights within the world of sports.”

The symposium was jointly sponsored by Chicago Sports Net and DePaul University, and gave attendees a first look at their upcoming six-part documentary, “Tomboy,” that takes a deeper look into the involvement of women in sports. The article cites the Tucker Center’s statistic that only four percent of all sports coverage includes women’s sports.

PAEL researchers will present next week at SHAPE America National Convention

Researchers from the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL) in the School of Kinesiology will give six presentations and be included as coauthors on two other presentations at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention in Boston, MA, from March 14th to 18th. PAEL Director Zan Gao, Ph.D., and Ph.D. candidates June Lee and Zachary Pope, Ph.D. student Nan Zeng, and undergraduate student Kalli Fautsch will be presenting. Their presentations are listed below.

Gao, Z., Leininger, B., Schulz, C., Bronfort, G., Evans, R., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., & Haas, M. (2017, March). Relationships between physical activity and low back pain in adolescents
Fautsch, K., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Exercise modalities on physical activity and behavior in ASD children.
Lee, J., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Effect of home-based Exergaming on preschool children’s cognitive function and cardiorespiratory fitness.
Li, X., Peng, Q., Tan, J., Yang, H., He, W., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Relationships among Chinese college children’s motives and physical activity behavior.
Peng, Q., Li, X., Tan, J., Yang, H., He, W., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Associations among college students’ physical activity, sedentary time and health.
Pope, Z., & Gao, Z., (2017, March). Effectiveness of smartphone-based physical activity intervention on college student health: Randomized-controlled trial.
Pope, Z., Lee, J., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Validity of smartwatches in assessing energy expenditure and heart rate.
Zeng, N., Lee, J., Pope, Z., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Comparison of physiological and psychological outcomes between normal weight and overweight/obese college students during exergaming.

Russell, White, and Wiese-Bjornstal publish study in Sage Publications

School of Kinesiology alumna Hayley Russell, Ph.D. (2014), is the lead author on an article just released by Sage Publications. Co-authors are Andrew White, Kinesiology Ph.D. student, and their adviser, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., Kinesiology professor. Dr. Russell is currently a faculty member at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN.

The complete citation is: Russell, H. C., White, A. C., & Wiese-Bjornstal, D. M. (2017). Physical and psychological changes during marathon training and running injuries: An interdisciplinary, repeated-measures approach. SAGE research methods cases. London, UK: Sage Publications.

Kinesiology Student Council awarded grant monies to host Kinesiology Research Day

The Kinesiology Student Council has been awarded over $900 combined in grant monies to host the 2nd Annual Kinesiology Research Day on April 21, 2017, in 400 Suite Walter Library. These monies came from two sources: A Minnesota Student Association’s Event Grant and a CEHD GradSEHD Cohort Development Grant.
Kinesiology Research Day promises to be an opportunity for faculty members, staff, graduate students and undergraduate students from the School of Kinesiology and relevant departments to interact in an interdisciplinary forum, exchange ideas and present their achievements. Notably, this is the second consecutive year the Council has acquired funding for this annual event, with the Council intending to once again make Kinesiology Research Day a first-class affair.

Wade to give talk at University of Georgia

On February 17, 2017, Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, will speak at the College of Education, University of Georgia, as part of their Research Colloquium Series.

In his talk, “Does theorizing about Developmental Coordination Disorder inform diagnosis and intervention?”, Dr. Wade will comment on the empirical data and conclusions as to the possible cause of developmental coordination disorder. He argues that the data for an information theory explanation is not compelling, and a reconsideration of developmental coordination disorder from a dynamical systems perspective is perhaps more promising.

Stoffregen appointed to Gait & Posture board

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has accepted an appointment to the editorial board for Gait & Posture, one of the pre-eminent journals in the field of Movement Science. The journal is a vehicle for the publication of up-to-date basic and clinical research on all aspects of locomotion and balance.

Gait & Posture has a 1-year Impact Factor of 2.286, and a 5-Year Impact Factor of 2.864.

Kihl and collegeaues serve as guest editors for special issue on corruption in sport

KihllL-prefLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues James Skinner, MBA, Ph.D. (Loughborough University-London) and Terry Engelberg-Moston, Ph.D. (James Cook University-Australia) served as guest editors for the Special Issue – Corruption in sport: Understanding the complexity of corruption in European Sport Management Quarterly.

In addition, to serving as guest editors, Kihl and colleagues wrote an introductory piece emphasizing how the special issue increases our understanding of the complexity and multidimensional nature of sport corruption through examining integrity and different causes of match fixing.

The entire piece can be read online: “Corruption in sport: Understanding the complexity of corruption“.

Wiese-Bjornstal will present at Florida State University’s SPEAR conference

Wiese-BjornstalD-2015On February 9, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab,  will be the keynote speaker at  Florida State University’s Sport Professionals’ Experience and Research (SPEAR) conference hosted by the student-led graduate organization, Sport Psychology Organization & Research Team (SPORT). Dr. Wiese-Bjornstal will be giving two invited lectures about evidence-based research and evidence-based practice in sports medicine psychology.

Wiese-Bjornstal, alumna Russell, publish in SAGE Research Methods

Wiese-Bjornstal
Russell

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and Ph.D. alumna Hayley Russell, ’14, have published a research methods case study in SAGE Research Methods Cases. Russell is an assistant professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN. The case is titled “A Narrative Approach to Understanding Psychological Stories of Overuse Injuries Among Long-Distance Runners,” and it investigates the experiences of athletes with overuse injuries, specifically long-distance runners, by means of a narrative methodology.

Read the full study here.

 

Stoffregen to publish in Ecological Psychology

StoffregenT_2015A study by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), along with Bruno Mantel and Benoit G. Bardy, has been accepted for publication in Ecological Psychology. The article is titled “The senses considered as one perceptual system.”

While peer-reviewed, the article was invited as part of a special issue commemorating the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems, by James J. Gibson, one of the foundational statements of the Ecological Approach to Perception and Action.

Dr. Mantel is on the faculty at the University of Caen, while Dr. Bardy is on the faculty at the University of Montpellier, both in France.

InsideHigherEd cites just-released Tucker Center Women Coaches Report

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageAn article appearing on the InsideHigherEd online site, “Report: Hiring of Women’s Coaches Stagnates,” features a Tucker Center newly released report, “Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Select NCAA Division-I Institutions, 2016-17.” The report, one of several in the fifth year of the series, is authored by Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology faculty Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. The InsideHigherEd piece focuses on both the lack of decline but also the continued underrepresentation of women coaches of women’s sports in the collegiate arena.

LaVoi, Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report Card featured on espnW

Nicole M. LaVoi, Tucker Center Associate Director, 2013 imageThe Tucker Center‘s “Women Coaches Research Series & Report Card,” authored by co-director and School of Kinesiology faculty Dr. Nicole M. LaVoi, is featured in an online espnW article, “Tucker Center report: Number of women college coaches still not making the grade.” The report is quoted multiple times within the article, discussing the impact women coaches have on the diversity and culture of sports.

Gao and Lee publish paper in Computers in Human Behavior


Zan Gao, Ph.D
.
, associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and Director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab, recently published a paper in Computers in Human Behavior. The first author, Jung Eun Lee, is Dr. Gao’s Ph.D. student and currently an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

The paper examined the acute effect of playing a single bout of active video games on children’s mood change and whether mood change differed by gender and age group. The researchers found that a short bout of active video games significantly reduced anger, depression and vigor, and fourth grade children had greater vigor than the third graders.

Lee, J., Xiang, P., & Gao, Z. (2017). Acute effect of active video games on older children’s mood change. Computers in Human Behavior, 70, 97-103. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.12.060 (impact factor: 2.69)