CEHD News Research

CEHD News Research

PAEL lab’s Pope, Zeng, Lee, and Gao publish in Translational Behavioral Medicine

Zach Pope
Dr. Zan Gao

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology and a member of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), is first author on a recently published article in Translational Behavioral Medicine titled, “Feasibility of Smartphone Application and Social Media Intervention on Breast Cancer Survivors’ Health Outcomes.” The article’s co-authors include lab member Nan Zeng, Ph.D. candidate, former lab member June Lee, Ph.D.Zan Gao, Ph.D., lab director, as well as Hee Yun Lee, Ph.D. from the University of Alabama.

The study investigates the feasibility of employing a commercially available mobile health application and social media-based health education intervention to improve breast cancer survivors’ physical activity and health. Observations indicate that the 10-week intervention designed to increase physical activity duration and steps per day decreases body weight and body fat percentage. Improvements in breast cancer survivors’ quality of life were also observed.

Dengel and colleagues publish in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and colleagues have published in the online publication, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

The article, “Association between carotid intimata media thickness, age, and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents,” describes their study to determine the relations of measures of carotid intima media thickness with body mass index and cardiovascular risk score in children. The study concluded that maintaining normal levels of adiposity and other risk variables may be useful in preventing early changes associated with preclinical atherosclerosis.

 

Stoffregen publishes in newest Kinesiology Review issue

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory,  published in a recent issues of Kinesiology Review. In his article titled “Ecological Physics and the Perceptual Information That Supports Motor Control,” he discusses the nature of perceptual information and implications for kinesiology.

Kinesiology Review is the official publication of the National Academy of Kinesiology (NAK) and the American Kinesiology Association (AKA).

 

Former LIHP graduate student is author of recently published paper


Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a 2016 graduate from the School of Kinesiology and former member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of an article recently published in the journal, Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article, entitled “Intra- and Interday reproducibility of high-flow-mediated constriction response in young adults” examined the reproducibility of a method to measure vascular health. The results of this study indicate high-flow-mediated constriction is reproducible in young adults and should be included to assess vascular health. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the LIHP in the School of Kinesiology, Ostrem’s adviser, is a co-author on this article, as well as current lab members Nick Evanoff and Justin Ryder.

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D.
Dr. Don Dengel
Donald Dengel, Ph.D.

HSC lab publishes first study in 2018 on abnormal muscle activity in horses with shivers disease

In an interdisciplinary collaboration with partners in veterinary medicine at the University of Minnesota and the Michigan State University, researchers in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory examined horses with shivers disease.

An earlier study identified the previously unknown neuropathology of the disease – a degeneration of neurons in the cerebellum. Because the cerebellum is involved in coordinating the control of muscles during movement, the researchers wanted to find out how the loss of cerebellar function affects the muscle recruitment in these horses. Like humans, horses activate more muscle fibers if they want to run faster. However, these horses recruited more muscles and more muscle fibers than necessary, which led to a loss of movement coordination and problems in their balance.

The results of this study, “Abnormal locomotor muscle recruitment activity is present in horses with shivering and Purkinje cell distal axonopathy,” are published in a paper that appears in Equine Veterinary Journal. Joshua Aman, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral researcher in the lab, is the first author of the paper. Other co-authors are current lab member Naveen Elangovan, Ph.D., and Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.professor in the School of Kinesiology.

 

 

Konczak gives talk to U of M ataxia group colloquium

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, gave a lecture on “Somatosensory training to overcome motor dysfunction in dystonia and Parkinson’s disease” to the University of Minnesota ataxia research group. The ataxia group is an interdisciplinary group of basic science and clinical researchers interested in understanding the neuropathology of ataxia and its treatment. Dr. Konczak spoke about how a sensory-based rehabilitation training can improve motor function in focal dystonia and Parkinson’s disease.

Weiss receives Legacy Award by Girls on the Run International

From the left: Liz Kunz (CEO of GOTRI), Maureen R. Weiss, Allie Riley (Senior VP of Evaluation and Programming)

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was recognized with the Legacy Award, the highest honor given by Girls on the Run International at its annual Summit in Austin, TX, in January. Girls on the Run is a 501(c)(3) organization and physical activity-based positive youth development (PA-PYD) program designed to enhance girls’ social, psychological, and physical skills and behaviors to successfully navigate life experiences. The program uses running and other physical activities as a platform for teaching life skills and promoting holistic health outcomes for girls in grades 3-8. The organization’s reach is national—in all 50 states with over 200 local community councils, 50,000 volunteer coaches, and over 1.5 million girls served since inception. The organization is committed to diversity—serving girls from all walks of life and backgrounds. Nearly 50% of girls receive subsidized registration fees to enable them to attain the psychosocial and behavioral benefits of participating in each season’s 10-week program.

Weiss’ Legacy Award was based on eight years and hundreds of hours devoted to serving this non-profit organization—as a board member, consultant, speaker, and contributor to curricular development and effective coach delivery—as well as conducting an independent longitudinal evaluation study that demonstrated strong and lasting positive impact of program participation on girls’ life skills learning and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes—confidence, competence, connection, caring, character, and contribution to community and society. The study received widespread attention in a press release last August and Weiss presented the study results at the Summit meeting in a presentation titled, “How and Why Girls on the Run is an Exemplary Positive Youth Development Program.”

 

Tucker Center releases 2017-18 NCAA Division-I Women Coaches Report

The Tucker Center, in collaboration with the Alliance of Women Coaches, is proud to announce the release of the 2017-18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences report and infographic. 40+ years after the passage of Title IX, female sport participation is at an all-time high but the percentage of women coaching women at the collegiate level is stagnant. While the number of collegiate coaching opportunities is also at a record high, only 20% of all college coaching positions for men’s and women’s teams are filled by women. One goal of this report is to change that trend. View the report and infographic here…

Leon co-author on Alzheimer’s study

Art Leon, M.D., professor of exercise physiology in the School of Kinesiology, is a co-author of a study recently published in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias. The article is titled “Determination of Aerobic Capacity via Cycle Ergometer Exercise Testing in Alzheimer’s Disease.” The study investigated older adults with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) to determine individualized aerobic capacity and ability to perform treadmill testing due to balance or gait issues.

First author of the publication is Leon’s former doctoral student Ulf G. Bronas, Ph.D., ATC, associate professor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

 

British newspaper The Independent writes about Stoffregen’s research

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, has his research mentioned in the British newspaper The Independent.

The article titled “Virtual-reality headsets ‘make women sick,” is based on Stoffregen’s peer-published study that measured motion sickness using the VR headset Oculus Rift, which was originally published in Experimental Brain Research. The Independent piece quotes Stoffregen saying that motion sickness research reveals that “pretty much always women are more susceptible than men.”

Lewis publishes article on sleep pattern changes and postpartum depressive symptoms

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., director and professor in the School of Kinesiology, has published the article “The effect of sleep pattern changes on postpartum depressive symptoms in BMC Women’s Health, a peer-reviewed, open access journal with a focus on the physical, mental, and emotional health of women.

The study finds an increased risk for depressive symptoms later in the postpartum phase if sleep problems with postpartum women worsen or show only minimal improvement over time. One conclusion recommends a six-week postpartum clinic visit to educate women about potential worsening of sleep patterns and to provide strategies for preventing sleep-related problems in order to decrease the risk of postpartum depression.

One of the co-authors is Katie Schuver, Ph.D., research associate in Lewis’s Exercise and Mental Health Laboratory.

Kihl is editor, co-author of new book on corruption in sport

Corruption in SportKihlLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology has published an edited book titled Corruption in Sport: Causes, Consequences, and Reform. Published by Routledge, the book is a seminal text that explores the complexity of sport corruption in terms of its conceptualization, measurement, causes, consequences, reform, and future research. Corruption in sport is part of the “Routledge Research in Sport and Corruption” series.

Kihl wrote four of the chapters and was co-author on another. The book is available in print or as an

Gao and colleagues publish in BioMed Research International

Dr. Zan Gao
Gao
Nan Zeng
Zeng

Zan Gao, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology associate professor, has published an article with colleagues in BioMed Research International.  This study synthesized literature concerning casual evidence of effects of various physical activity programs on motor skills and cognitive development in typically developed preschool children. Of the five studies, four (80%) showed significant and positive changes in language learning, academic achievement, attention, and working memory.

Nan Zeng, lead author on the article, is a Ph.D. candidate in Kinesiology and is advised by Dr. Gao.

The full citation:
Effects of Physical Activity on Motor Skills and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood: A Systematic Review.” N. Zeng, M. Ayyub, H. Sun, X Wen, P Xiang, Z. Gao. BioMed Research International, 2017.

 

 

Wiese-Bjornstal and former advisee Hayley Russell publish article in Quest

Diane Wiese Bjornstal, Ph.D.Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, and former advisee Hayley Russell, Ph.D., have published an article in Quest with two other colleagues.

Physical Activity in Former Competitive Athletes: The Physical and Psychological Impact of Musculoskeletal Injury”  investigates the impacts of injury on the physical activity of competitive athletes after retirement.

Dr. Russell, who received her Ph.D. in 2014, is assistant professor of Health and Exercise Science at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN.

 

 

Lewis and McAvoy are featured in December 2017 issue of Connect

Connect, the magazine of the College of Education and Human Development, features two School of Kinesiology faculty/emeritus faculty in the December 2017 issue.

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., School director and professor, is featured in “Healthy Moms,” a story about her research in the areas of motivational interventions for physical activity and the relationship between exercise and mental health, and her pivotal studies focused on the role of exercise in preventing postpartum depression. She is also working on a new research project on postpartum depression prevention beginning during pregnancy and continuing through the postpartum phase.

Leo McAvoy, Ph.D., professor emeritus of recreation, park, and leisure studies in the School, was presented the Outstanding Achievement Award last July, the highest honor presented to a University alumnus.  “Everybody outside!” recounts his many years as an inspiring, involved, and beloved professor and scholar, driven by deep commitment to and respect for the power of nature and his belief in the value of hands-on education.

Dengel publishes article in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is a co-author of an article recently published online in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.

This article titled “The Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Arterial Stiffness of Pediatric Mucopolysaccharidosis Patients Are Increased Compared to Both Pediatric and Adult Controls” examined vascular health in children with the genetic disease mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). The data from this study suggested that children with mucopolysaccharidoses demonstrated a “structural vascular age” similar to adults who were 40 years older. Indicating the advanced development of cardiovascular disease.

 

Weiss gives invited presentation at The First Tee’s 20th anniversary network meeting

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, gave an invited presentation at the 20th anniversary network meeting of The First Tee on November 11 in Orlando, FL.

In her presentation titled, “How Research Informs Everything We Do,” Weiss shared findings from four years of longitudinal research that provide evidence of effectiveness of life skills learning, and how executive directors, board members, and chapter volunteers can use the data for marketing and fundraising purposes for their program.

The First Tee is a youth development organization whose curriculum and coach training program are designed to teach life skills and core values using golf as the vehicle. The organization impacts the lives of young people from all walks of life by reinforcing values like respect, integrity, confidence, and perseverance.

 

Dengel speaks at Hamline University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at Hamline University, Biology Department on November 10. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Pediatric Vascular Health: Growing Up.”

Dengel gives talk at University of Maryland

On November 15, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was, “Obesity and Pediatric Vascular Dysfunction: What are the Solutions?”

 

Raymond-Pope, Dengel, and Bosch publish in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Kinesiology doctoral student Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on an article written with kinesiology professor Donald Dengel, Ph.D., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., and published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 

The article, “Total and Segmental Body Composition Examination in Collegiate Football Players Using Multifrequency Bia and Dxa,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between two different means of measurement used in assessing total and segmental percent body fat.

Raymond-Pope is currently advised by Dengel, and Bosch is a former advisee who graduated with his Ph.D. in kinesiology in 2014. Dengel is the director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology in the School of Kinesiology.

Raymond-Pope
Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Tyler Bosch
Dr. Bosch