Category Archives: Research

Stoffregen discusses motion sickness research in To See the Sea

An online publication for the cruising set, To See the Sea, features an interview with Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and researcher on motion sickness. Stoffregen discusses his fascination as a boy in the 1960s with astronauts and space travel, including the phenomenon of motion sickness (which afflicts many astronauts in space), and how it led him to the research he is doing today.

The podcast and written transcript are available at tps://toseethesea.com/index.php/interviews/.

Stoffregen interviewed by online publication PsyPost

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perceptual-Action Laboratory, was interviewed by the online publication PsyPost on his research relating to the virtual reality headset Oculus Rift. His study, conducted with Kinesiology Ph.D. student Justin Munafo and U of M undergraduate honors student Meg Diedrick, indicates that using the headset can cause motion sickness, and that women are more likely to experience this effect than men.  Stoffregen says, “As interactive devices increasingly pervade the lives of ordinary people, motion sickness related to these technologies becomes more and more common. The problem is getting worse, not better.” 

The article is available here.

 

New York Times cites Tucker Center Women Coaches Report data

In reviewing the status of women in college coaching the New York Times article, “Number of Women Coaching in College Has Plummeted in Title IX Era,” cites the Tucker Center’s most recent Women in College Coaching Series report, “Head coaches of women’s collegiate teams: A report on select NCAA Division-I institutions, 2016-17.”

Weiss and Former Students Receive Outstanding Research Writing Award

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues and former students Nicole Bolter (PhD, 2010, UMN) and Lindsay Kipp (PhD, 2012, UMN), are recipients of the Outstanding Research Writing Award for their article published in Volume 87 of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES). The Research Council of the Society for Health and Physical Education (SHAPE) recognized the authors at their annual meeting on March 16. This award identifies one article in each yearly volume of RQES that characterizes an outstanding contribution of scholarship and writing quality from among all manuscripts published that year. This is the seventh time that Weiss has personally been recognized with this scholarly writing award.

Dr. Weiss (left), Dr. Bolter (center), and Dr. Kipp (right)

The full citation is, Weiss, M. R., Bolter, N. D., & Kipp, L. E. (2016). Evaluation of The First Tee in Promoting Positive Youth Development: Group Comparisons and Longitudinal Trends. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 87, 271-283.

Here is a brief abstract: Purpose: This manuscript represents the third in a series documenting our longitudinal evaluation of The First Tee, a physical activity-based youth development program that uses golf as a vehicle for teaching life skills and enhancing developmental outcomes. Previous phases of our project: (a) established initial data-based evidence of effectiveness through cross-sectional and qualitative methods (Weiss et al., 2013), and (b) provided validity and reliability for a measure of life skills transfer in three studies using mixed methods (Weiss et al., 2014). The purpose of the present phase was to: (a) compare youth in The First Tee to youth in other activities on life skills transfer and developmental outcomes, and (b) examine change and stability over three years in life skills transfer among youth in The First Tee. Method: In Study 1, youth participating in The First Tee (N = 405) and a comparison group (N = 159) completed measures of key constructs. In Study 2, a longitudinal sample of 192 youth participating in The First Tee completed the life skills transfer measure for three consecutive years. Results: Study 1 revealed that youth in The First Tee compared favorably to youth in other activities on 5 of 8 life skills and 6 of 8 developmental outcomes, and Study 2 showed that scores improved or remained stable for life skills transfer over time. Conclusion: Results from both studies show that The First Tee is effective in teaching for transfer of life skills and promoting developmental outcomes.

April 7 rebroadcasts of Tucker Center “Concussions and Female Athletes” video

The Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to announce several rebroadcasts this April of its groundbreaking video, “Concussions and Female Athletes.”

tptMN Statewide Digital MN Channel
Fri 7 April @ 2:00 am
Fri 7 April @ 8:00 pm

Through the personal stories and experiences of coaches, athletes and their families, as well as in-depth interviews with nationally recognized scholars and medical experts, this documentary examines the causes underlying concussion and offers practical solutions to help prevent and treat sports-related concussion injuries in female athletes.

To view the entire program online now, click here. For more information on upcoming broadcasts, click here.

C&I student receives collaborative research grant from the Institute for Advanced Study

Ezekiel Joubert, a Ph.D. candidate in Culture and Teaching in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, has received a grant from the Institute for Advanced Study as part of an interdisciplinary Research and Creative Collaborative, “Historical Injustices: The Working Group.”

The IAS is a University-wide interdisciplinary center, and a resource for scholars, artists, professionals, and students who are engaged in a wide variety of study and practice. It also serves as a bridge between the University and the wider community as a place where people meet and ideas are exchanged.

The Historical Injustices Working Group also includes Yuichiro Onishi from the Department of African American & African Studies, Catherine Squires from the Department of Communication Studies, Hana Maruyama from the Department of American Studies and John Matsunaga from Asian American Studies. “We are interested in tracing the University of Minnesota’s ties to both slavery and Japanese wartime resettlement,” says Joubert. “In particular, I am looking at developing a curriculum based on our research.”

Joubert also notes that the working group is hoping to tie their research findings to the movement of slaves up and down the Mississippi river. “Part of project is to increase students’ of color engagement in the river itself,” says Joubert, adding that all school-aged children in Minnesota study African American history as part of the curriculum and ethnic studies are now offered as an elective in the state of Minnesota where he sees the curriculum he is developing as a good fit.

“Almost all universities have an invisible history related to colonialism and racial injustice,” says Joubert. “Whether it was the removal of indigineous people off lands or racial injustices related to civil rights.” He adds that he hopes the Historical Injustices Working Group can shed light on some of these issues.

Find out more about the research degrees offered in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

 

Kihl and colleague to publish in Business & Society Review

KihllL-prefAssociate professor Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, and her colleague, Dr. Kathy Babiak (University of Michigan) have had their paper titled, “A blueprint for CSR engagement: Identifying stakeholder expectations and attitudes of a community relations program,” accepted for publication in Business & Society Review. The paper examines sport stakeholders’ expectations regarding corporations’ CSR initiatives through dialogue. Kihl and Babiak argue that stakeholder dialogue is an important way for a business to gain perceptions about how it is viewed and evaluated by its stakeholders and underlies subsequent interactions.

Stoffregen featured in latest Science News cover story

The cover story of the March 18 issue of Science News includes the latest research being conducted by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL). Stoffregen is quoted extensively on his work related to virtual reality, motion sickness, and the sex connection.

 

Award-winning book on sport management theory features chapters by Inoue, Kane, and Kihl

Three School of Kinesiology faculty contributed chapters to an award-winning book on sport management theory.

Routledge Handbook of Theory in Sport Management was selected as an Outstanding Academic Title 2016 by CHOICE magazine, published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., and Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., each wrote chapters. This is the first book to trace the intellectual contours of theory in sport management, and to explain, critique and celebrate the importance of sport management theory in academic research, teaching and learning, and in the development of professional practice.

Inoue and Kihl contributed to the Managerial Theories section with their chapters, “Developing a Theory of Suffering and Academic Corruption in Sport” (Kihl) and “Applying Strategic CSR in Sport” (Inoue). Kane contributed the chapter “The Continuum Theory: Challenging Traditional Conceptualization and Practices of Sport” in the section Sociocultural Theories. Dr. Kane is director of the School of Kinesiology’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, and Dr. Kihl is an affiliated scholar in the Tucker Center.

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Kim will publish in Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport

Young Ho Kim, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has had a paper accepted for publication in the Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport. The paper, entitled “The Normalization of Sport Corruption and Interdependence of the Factors: Symbiosis of Threefolding’s Organism,” examines 1) how sport corruption is normalized in certain sport organizations and societies, and 2) how sport corruption, through the process of normalization, is produced and reproduced in their organic system. Young is advised by Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., and Rayla Allison, JD.

Stoffregen quoted in ScienceNews

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was interviewed about his research related to motion sickness and virtual reality for the March 18 edition of ScienceNews. A number of researchers believe that sensory mismatch is to blame for the motion sickness that can be present with virtual reality use, but Stoffregen believes that instability is the culprit. The full article can be accessed here.

Stoffregen also is lab director for the School’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory.

Betker and Orr are finalists in CEHD Three Minute Thesis Competition

Morgan Betker
Madeleine Orr

Two Kinesiology doctoral candidates are finalists in CEHD’s Research Day competition, Three Minute Thesis (3MT), which will be held March 28  from 10-11 a.m. in the McNamara Alumni Center Johnson Room.

Morgan Betker (exercise physiology emphasis) and Madeleine Orr (sport management emphasis) will be competing with six doctoral students from across the college for the first prize of $500. Prizes of $250 will go to the runner-up and people’s choice. The finalists were chosen from a preliminary round competition held last week.

Ms. Betker’s presentation is “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers” and Ms. Orr’s presentation is “The rhetoric vs. the reality of sport event legacies.”

3MT is an annual competition held in over 200 universities worldwide. It’s designed to challenge Ph.D. students to present their research in just three minutes in an engaging format that can be understood by an audience with no background in their discipline. The competition is intended to help students develop a presentation on their research and hone their academic communication skills to explain their work effectively to a general audience.

Judges in the CEHD competition are Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African-American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.

Varma, student present research on the origins of numerical abilities to Royal Society

Sashank Varma, associate professor and coordinator for the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, and doctoral student, Soo-hyun Im, recently traveled to London for the Royal Society Meeting on the Origins of Numerical Abilities, a scientific discussion about how when humans acquire numerical competence, we build upon an inherited cognitive foundation. At the meeting, Varma and Im presented their research projects entitled Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students1 and From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis.2

Co-authors of Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement include: Purav Patel, a doctoral student in psychological foundations of education and Rachel Voit, a Macalester College student at the time of data collection and now a masters student in social work.

The Royal Society is a fellowship of many of the world’s most eminent scientists and is the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.

  1.  Varma, S., Voit, R., Im, S.-h., & Patel, P. J. (2017, February). Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.
  1. Im, S.-h., & Varma, S. (2017, February). From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.

Pope awarded $1200 COGS Travel Grant to present at SHAPE America’s national convention 

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has been awarded a $1200 Council of Graduate Students (COGS) Travel Grant to present two posters and give one oral presentation at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention held in Boston March 14-18. Pope is advised by Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory.

COGS is a University-wide student organization that represents, advocates for, and supports graduate students at the U of M. The travel grant supports students who present original work at a conference with a poster, oral presentation, or other acceptable format.  The maximum award is $1200.

While at the SHAPE America Convention, Pope will also be awarded a 2017 Research Council Graduate Student Research Award by SHAPE America for his project, “Validity of Smartwatches in Assessing Energy Expenditure and Heart Rate.”

Tucker Center research referenced at Women in Sports panel in Chicago

Tucker Center  research on media coverage for women’s sports was cited in an article appearing on The DePaulia online site, “Jean Lenti Posetto and Doug Bruno talk DePaul and women’s sports at symposium.” The symposium, held in Chicago, featured a panel of Chicago-based sports professionals who agreed that they were “tired of continuously fighting for equal female rights within the world of sports.”

The symposium was jointly sponsored by Chicago Sports Net and DePaul University, and gave attendees a first look at their upcoming six-part documentary, “Tomboy,” that takes a deeper look into the involvement of women in sports. The article cites the Tucker Center’s statistic that only four percent of all sports coverage includes women’s sports.

PAEL researchers will present next week at SHAPE America National Convention

Researchers from the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL) in the School of Kinesiology will give six presentations and be included as coauthors on two other presentations at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention in Boston, MA, from March 14th to 18th. PAEL Director Zan Gao, Ph.D., and Ph.D. candidates June Lee and Zachary Pope, Ph.D. student Nan Zeng, and undergraduate student Kalli Fautsch will be presenting. Their presentations are listed below.

Gao, Z., Leininger, B., Schulz, C., Bronfort, G., Evans, R., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., & Haas, M. (2017, March). Relationships between physical activity and low back pain in adolescents
Fautsch, K., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Exercise modalities on physical activity and behavior in ASD children.
Lee, J., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Effect of home-based Exergaming on preschool children’s cognitive function and cardiorespiratory fitness.
Li, X., Peng, Q., Tan, J., Yang, H., He, W., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Relationships among Chinese college children’s motives and physical activity behavior.
Peng, Q., Li, X., Tan, J., Yang, H., He, W., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Associations among college students’ physical activity, sedentary time and health.
Pope, Z., & Gao, Z., (2017, March). Effectiveness of smartphone-based physical activity intervention on college student health: Randomized-controlled trial.
Pope, Z., Lee, J., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Validity of smartwatches in assessing energy expenditure and heart rate.
Zeng, N., Lee, J., Pope, Z., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Comparison of physiological and psychological outcomes between normal weight and overweight/obese college students during exergaming.

Russell, White, and Wiese-Bjornstal publish study in Sage Publications

School of Kinesiology alumna Hayley Russell, Ph.D. (2014), is the lead author on an article just released by Sage Publications. Co-authors are Andrew White, Kinesiology Ph.D. student, and their adviser, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., Kinesiology professor. Dr. Russell is currently a faculty member at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN.

The complete citation is: Russell, H. C., White, A. C., & Wiese-Bjornstal, D. M. (2017). Physical and psychological changes during marathon training and running injuries: An interdisciplinary, repeated-measures approach. SAGE research methods cases. London, UK: Sage Publications.

Kinesiology Student Council awarded grant monies to host Kinesiology Research Day

The Kinesiology Student Council has been awarded over $900 combined in grant monies to host the 2nd Annual Kinesiology Research Day on April 21, 2017, in 400 Suite Walter Library. These monies came from two sources: A Minnesota Student Association’s Event Grant and a CEHD GradSEHD Cohort Development Grant.
Kinesiology Research Day promises to be an opportunity for faculty members, staff, graduate students and undergraduate students from the School of Kinesiology and relevant departments to interact in an interdisciplinary forum, exchange ideas and present their achievements. Notably, this is the second consecutive year the Council has acquired funding for this annual event, with the Council intending to once again make Kinesiology Research Day a first-class affair.

Wade to give talk at University of Georgia

On February 17, 2017, Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, will speak at the College of Education, University of Georgia, as part of their Research Colloquium Series.

In his talk, “Does theorizing about Developmental Coordination Disorder inform diagnosis and intervention?”, Dr. Wade will comment on the empirical data and conclusions as to the possible cause of developmental coordination disorder. He argues that the data for an information theory explanation is not compelling, and a reconsideration of developmental coordination disorder from a dynamical systems perspective is perhaps more promising.

Stoffregen appointed to Gait & Posture board

StoffregenT_2015Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has accepted an appointment to the editorial board for Gait & Posture, one of the pre-eminent journals in the field of Movement Science. The journal is a vehicle for the publication of up-to-date basic and clinical research on all aspects of locomotion and balance.

Gait & Posture has a 1-year Impact Factor of 2.286, and a 5-Year Impact Factor of 2.864.