Category Archives: Research

Lewis and colleagues publish in Women’s Health

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues (including her advisees Lauren Billing, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate,  and Katie Schuver, Kinesiology Ph.D., 2014 ) have had an article published in Women’s Health.

The article is titled “The relationship between employment status and depression symptomatology among women at risk for postpartum depression.”

OLPD Ph.D. student wins NODA grant for rural student retention research

Keelin Yenney, a Ph.D. student studying higher education in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD),  has been awarded a grant from the National Association for Orientation, Transfer, and Retention (NODA) for her research regarding the retention of rural students.

“Social Capital and Sense of Belonging: Exploring Assigned Academic Advising as a Retention Tool for Rural Students”
The purpose of this study is to explore how rural students experience assigned academic advising as a tool to develop social capital and sense of belonging in an urban college environment and the ways these experiences influence retention.

Tucker Center research cited in article on Meyer case at Iowa

The Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report research series is cited in a Cedar Rapids Gazette article, “After Jane Meyer verdict, UI orders review of employment practices.” Meyer, a former senior Associate Athletics Director, had filed a gender and sexual orientation case against the University.

Kinesiology undergraduate Samantha Mussehl receives UROP award

Samantha Mussehl, an undergraduate student in the School of Kinesiology, has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Samantha’s UROP will examine whether the soleus muscle shows signs of mechanical or neural injury and repair following a hemorrhagic stroke. The project is under the direction of LeAnn Snow, MD, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Division of Physical Therapy. Samantha is advised by Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor and director of the School’s Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and she is working on a directed study project with him.

The UROP Award offers financial awards to full-time undergraduates for quality research, scholarly, or creative projects that are judged to contribute to the student’s academic development and which are undertaken in collaboration with a faculty sponsor.

Gao and students publish book on technology, physical activity, and health promotion

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, recently published a book titled “Technology in Physical Activity and Health Promotion” together with his graduate students Jung Eun Lee, Zachary PopeHaichun Sun, and Nan Zeng with Routledge publishers.

Offering a logical and clear critique of technology in physical activity and health promotion, this book will serve as an essential reference for upper-level undergraduates, postgraduate students and scholars working in public health, physical activity and health and kinesiology, and healthcare professionals.

The book is now available on the Routledge website and Amazon.com.

Kihl and colleagues’ article accepted for publication in Social Responsibility Journal

KihllL-prefLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D, associate professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology and co-authors Dr. Mansour Ndiaye (University of Connecticut) and Dr. Janet Fink (University of Massachusetts-Amherst) have had their article, “Corruption’s impact on organizational outcomes,” accepted for publication in Social Responsibility Journal.

The article reports on a model of corruption that was developed measuring the impact of sports corruption on organizational outcomes (i.e., win difference and attendance) and the mediating role of institutional reputation.

Konczak gives invited presentation at Neural Control of Movement meeting in Dublin

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, spoke to an audience of about 150 international neuroscientists at the 27th annual meeting of the Society for Neural Control of Movement in Dublin, Ireland.

Konczak provided an overview of his lab’s research on somatosensory deficits in Parkinson’s disease and dystonia and outlined how these sensory impairments may cause the motor deficits seen in the neurological diseases. He also presented recent work led by Dr. Naveen Elangovan, postdoctoral researcher in the lab, that showed that Parkinsonian symptoms can be improved through a specialized sensory training.

Inoue has article accepted for publication in Journal of Sport Management

image of Yuhei InoueKinesiology assistant professor Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., has had his article, “Sport Spectatorship and Life Satisfaction: A Multi-Country Investigation,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Sport Management. The article reports the findings of two studies demonstrating how engagement in elite and professional sport events, behaviorally through live spectating and psychologically through team identification, is associated with life satisfaction.

The in-press article may be accessed here: Inoue, Y., Sato, M., Filo, K., Du, J., & Funk, D.C. (in press). Sport spectatorship and life satisfaction: A multi-country investigation. Journal of Sport Management.

CEHD research on the development of autism featured in Spectrum

L-R: Jed Elison, Jason Wolff

Jason Wolff, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology’s special education program, was recently featured in a Spectrum article about his research using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in infants whose older siblings have autism. Wolff worked with a national team of researchers, including Jed Elison from the Institute for Child Development, on the study. Wolff and colleagues found that the development of specific brain circuits may predict the severity of repetitive and sensory behaviors in infants who later develop autism.

In the article, Spectrum explains, “repetitive behaviors, such as hand flapping, are a cardinal sign of autism”, and “children with these severe repetitive behaviors often also have unusual sensory features, such as sensitivities to sounds or textures or an insensitivity to pain.”

Wolff expands on this. “They both (repetitive behaviors and unusual sensory features) seem to share a similar relationship with underlying neural circuitry,” he says.

Read the full article.

Weiss to give keynote presentation at Sport Psychology Conference in Switzerland

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, will give the keynote lecture at the Annual Congress of the German Society of Sport Psychology in Bern, Switzerland, on May 25.

The title of her talk is, “Positive youth development through sport and physical activity: Progress, puzzles, and promise.” The Society represents the interests of the sport psychology community inside and outside universities in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria, and its purpose is to promote and develop research, teaching, and applied fields of performance, expertise, and health. In addition to her keynote lecture, Weiss will give a presentation as part of a symposium on Youth Sport titled, “Evaluating impact of physical activity-based positive youth development programs: A tale of two exemplars.”

Yuhei Inoue wins CEHD New Career Excellence Award for 2017

School of Kinesiology assistant professor Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., was presented CEHD’s New Career Excellence Award for 2017 at the college’s annual Assembly and Recognition Ceremony held at the Great Hall in Coffman Union yesterday.

The New Career Excellence Award “recognizes a new CEHD professional who has demonstrated outstanding and innovative academic work and shows great promise in terms of future contributions to the college and the field.”

Dr. Inoue teaches and does research in the sport management emphasis in the School of Kinesiology. He joined the faculty in 2014. His research explores the ways sport makes a positive impact on society and addresses the implications of strategic management issues related to sport organizations and corporate social responsibility initiatives.  For example, he conducted a study in Cambodia to  determine if sport participation that includes both able and disabled participants can create cooperative social relationships that enhance economic and social development. He and a master’s advisee have also conducted research on how social identification through attending sporting events may help increase older adults’ social connections and well-being.

Last fall, Dr. Inoue began working on a Temple University Sport Industry Research Center grant with several colleagues to explore how collegiate athletic departments in the U.S. are organized and operated and how the system could translate to Japan. Only a few Japanese universities have a unified athletics department. Generally their sports teams are privately managed rather than organized under the umbrella of an athletics department. Dr. Inoue believes that this study will help researchers understand collegiate athletics from a broader view, and he has been running case studies with the University of South Carolina, Old Dominion University and the University of Northern Colorado as part of the study.

Dr. Inoue also advises Madeleine Orr, Kinesiology doctoral student who won CEHD’s Three-Minute Thesis competition last month and reprised her presentation at yesterday’s award ceremony.

A contributor to Dr. Inoue’s nomination says, “He exhibits high levels of productivity and quality in scholarship and teaching, and does work that is meaningful and relevant to the human development and societal impact aspects of CEHD. Beyond his academic talents and scholarly expertise, however, I perhaps even more importantly see him as a wonderful colleague who willingly carries his share of responsibility for service work, mentoring, and student advising, represents a positive and collegial presence, and betters our school and college environment.”

Barr-Anderson will present at Diversity Through the Disciplines Symposium 2017

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, will presenting at the Diversity Through the Disciplines Symposium 2017 this Thursday, April 27, from 11:30 am – 3:00 pm in 100 Murphy Hall. The Symposium, hosted by The Institute for Diversity, Equity, and Advocacy, invites presenters who are past Multicultural Research Award Recipients.

Barr-Anderson will be speaking at 2:20 p.m. on her research, “A Mixed Methods Assessment of Family Influence on Weight-Related Behaviors Among African-Americans.”

C&I Ph.D. student, Joubert, receives Interdisciplinary Dissertation Development award

Ezekiel Joubert, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction received the Interdisciplinary Dissertation Development scholarship from the Institute of Advanced Studies to support his dissertation research. The program is designed to give University of Minnesota graduate students in the social science and humanities fields the opportunity to workshop, test, and begin the proposal writing process.

Joubert’s dissertation looks at the effects of economic migration on black Americans and what role educational opportunity played in altering the routes of the descendants of the Great Migration. Joubert’s family was part of the Great Migration that settled in Southeastern Michigan in a small cluster of rural and semi-rural townships and small cities forged by industrialization and transformed by black migrants in search of economic opportunities and safety from the Jim Crow South. Years later, this area experienced a wave of intrastate migration due to deindustrialization and disinvestment in cities such as Detroit.

“As a descendant of the Great Migration and a child of parents who left Detroit, I noticed a number of challenges facing these black residents: increasing concerns over contaminated land and water, a loss of economic opportunity in semi-rural or rural areas and most important to my study, public school closures and mergers and school of choice which has forced families to choose between traveling long distances to get their children to school or to uproot their families completely,” Joubert said, which helped him focus his research of understanding the effects of requiring students, particularly children of color, to involuntary and voluntary cross racial, economic, political, and regional borders.

Joubert is advised by associate professor Tim Lensmire.

Learn more about the Ph.D. program in Culture and Teaching in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Gao serves as guest editor for special issue of Journal of Sport and Health Science

Zan Gao, Ph.D., Kinesiology associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, recently served as the Guest Editor for a special issue of Journal of Sport and Health Science titled “Promoting Physical Activity and Health through Exergaming.”

The purpose of this special topic is to investigate the effects of exergaming on individuals’ energy expenditure, physical activity participation, sedentary behaviors, actual and perceived motor skills, activity choices, behavioral changes and psychosocial beliefs through experimental and quasi-experimental designs. The special issue includes a total of four original articles, one review article, one editorial, and one commentary piece contributed by research scientists in the USA, Australia, France, and Belgium. The special issue is available at this link.

Neil Hultgren, Kin M.S., wins second place in Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition

Neil Hultgren, Kinesiology M.S. student advised by Donald Dengel, Ph.D., director of  the  Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, took second place in the Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition at the University of Minnesota’s 31st Annual Pediatric Research, Education and Scholarship Symposium (PRESS) on April 14, 2017. Neil’s poster presentation was titled: “Central Blood Pressure Regulation in Relation to Hypertension and Adiposity in Youth.” The research is part of Neil’s master’s thesis.

Ed Psych researchers present on misinformation surrounding ASD

Despite the facts, people across the world hold different beliefs about what causes autism spectrum disorder (ASD). On March 31, faculty and researchers from the Department of Educational Psychology shared findings from a recent “glocal” (locally based with global components) study on the misinformation that surrounds ASD.

Panayiota Kendeou, Guy Bond Chair in Reading and associate professor in the psychological foundations of education program, kicked off the event with an introduction into the cognitive theory behind “Reducing the Impact of Misinformation around ASD.” She explained the misinformation effect and her Knowledge Revision Components Framework (KrEC) which examines the incremental steps of knowledge revision.Watch Kendeou’s presentation.

Gregory Trevors, post-doctoral fellow in the psychological foundations of education program, provided additional background, presenting local and global data from the study on “The Public’s Prior Knowledge about the Causes of ASD and its Relations to Treatment Recommendation.” Watch Trevor’s presentation.

Veronica Fleury, assistant professor and ASD licensure & M.Ed. coordinator in the special education program, presented findings from the local portion of the study conducted at the Minnesota State fair, specifically examining “The Impact of (source) Credibility on Treatment Recommendations.” Watch Fleury’s presentation.

Finally, Krista Muis, associate professor in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology at McGill University, provided an outside perspective on why the Global Signature Program is important. Muis, who studies how individuals process complex, contradictory content on socio-scientific issues such as vaccinations, noted the strengths of the research project. She also posed a few questions about the local portion of study and provided recommendations for future global research on the topic. Watch Muis’ presentation.

The event ended with a discussion that will help inform the content for future coursework, including a study abroad course focused on understanding ASD with an emphasis on debunking global misinformation.

The signature program is funded by the Office of International Initiatives and Relations at the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD).

  1. Kendeou, P., & O’Brien, E. J. (2014). The Knowledge Revision Components (KReC) Framework: Processes and Mechanisms. In D. Rapp, & J. Braasch (Eds.), Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences Cambridge: MIT.

Lewis presents two research projects at San Diego conference

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, presented twice at the 38th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Diego, CA., in March 2017.

The research projects Dr. Lewis presented are “Feasibility and efficacy of a physical activity intervention for the prevention of postpartum depression: A randomized trial.” (Lewis, B. A., Schuver, K., Gjerdingen, D., Terrell, C., & Avery, M. ) and “The future of physical activity intervention research: Expanding focus to sedentary behavior, technology, and dissemination.” (Lewis, B.A., Napolitano, M.A., Buman, M., Williams, D.M., Nigg, C.R.).

Kendeou presents at Northwestern University on debunking misinformation

Panayiota Kendeou

Panayiota (Pani) Kendeou, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Guy Bond Chair in Reading, recently presented to the Multi-disciplinary Program in Learning Sciences at Northwestern University on the “Science of Debunking Misinformation.”

In the talk, Kendeou discussed a series of studies that examine the incremental steps of knowledge revision, detailing its time course and mechanisms during reading comprehension in the context of the Knowledge Revision Components framework (KReC).1 She explained how KReC—which she developed with Professor Edward J O’Brien at the University of New Hampshire—aligns itself nicely with knowledge revision in the context of reading comprehension and has implications for research in text comprehension, conceptual change, persuasion, and the misinformation effect.

Get more information on Kendeou’s research by visiting her Reading & Language Lab.

  1. Kendeou, P., & O’Brien, E. J. (2014). The Knowledge Revision Components (KReC) Framework: Processes and Mechanisms. In D. Rapp, & J. Braasch (Eds.), Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences Cambridge: MIT.

Stoffregen discusses motion sickness research in To See the Sea

An online publication for the cruising set, To See the Sea, features an interview with Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and researcher on motion sickness. Stoffregen discusses his fascination as a boy in the 1960s with astronauts and space travel, including the phenomenon of motion sickness (which afflicts many astronauts in space), and how it led him to the research he is doing today.

The podcast and written transcript are available at tps://toseethesea.com/index.php/interviews/.

Stoffregen interviewed by online publication PsyPost

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perceptual-Action Laboratory, was interviewed by the online publication PsyPost on his research relating to the virtual reality headset Oculus Rift. His study, conducted with Kinesiology Ph.D. student Justin Munafo and U of M undergraduate honors student Meg Diedrick, indicates that using the headset can cause motion sickness, and that women are more likely to experience this effect than men.  Stoffregen says, “As interactive devices increasingly pervade the lives of ordinary people, motion sickness related to these technologies becomes more and more common. The problem is getting worse, not better.” 

The article is available here.