Category Archives: Research

StarTribune features Stoffregen and his research in article on virtual reality and motion sickness

Since 1990, Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, has studied motion sickness and virtual reality (VR), sometimes called “simulator sickness.” One of his interests is  examining the effects of VR and VR applications, which can cause people to become spatially disoriented and physically ill.

In a June 30 article titled  “What’s the future of virtual reality? Minnesota researchers may hold the answer,” the StarTribune discusses Stoffregen’s research and the way VR technology deals with motion sickness – or not.

“Why would anyone pay $600 for something that makes you toss your cookies?” Stoffregen asks in the article. He argues that companies who sell VR games are not dealing with changing the designs of the games, but are simply changing their liability rules should consumers become ill.

The article discusses Stoffregen’s research extensively, as well as studies being conducted by the Mayo Clinic, which may provide answers to the problems with nausea and sickness related to VR and VR applications across a broad spectrum.

Stoffregen gives invited talk at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

On June 30, Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), gave an invited talk at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA, titled “Getting your sea legs: The horizon, seasickness, and adaptive human movement.” His presentation was cited in an article in the Cape Cod Times on July 2.

WHOI was the terminus of Stoffregen’s latest research cruise from Costa Rica to Woods Hole. He and student lab members spent 16 days at sea conducting a number of experiments.

Lewis is co-investigator on NIH/National Institute of Nursing grant

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology director and professor, is a co-investigator on an NIH/National Institute of Nursing grant (R01 NR016705-01), “Community-based intervention effects of older adults’ physical activity and falls.” The purpose of this study is to identify behavioral change strategies that lead to increased physical activity and in turn lead to a reduction in falls and improved quality of life (QOL) among older adults. She will be working with PI Siobhan McMahon and other co-investigators to refine and consult on the intervention implementation and physical activity assessment. The grant will run through January, 2022.

Lewis served as a faculty mentor for Dr. McMahon’s KL2 Scholars Career Development Program for assistant professors conducting clinical or translational research.

 

 

Smith’s research presented at 12th International Conference on Occupational Stress and Health

Thomas J. Smith, Ph.D., adjunct lecturer for the School of Kinesiology, is first author on a paper presented at the recently concluded 12th International Conference on Occupational Stress and Health, “Work, Stress and Health 2017: Contemporary Challenges and Opportunities,” that convened in Minneapolis June 7-10. The paper is titled, ‘The Productivity Paradox – A Distracted Working Hypothesis.’ The paper also will be published in the conference proceedings.

Barr-Anderson appears on “Public Health Minute with Dr. William Latimer”

Daheia J Barr-AndersonDahiea Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory in the School of Kinesiology, appeared on the Public Health Minute with Dr. William Latimer, presented by the School of Health Sciences, Human Services, and Nursing at Lehman College, CUNY, Bronx, NY, on a segment titled “Physical Activity and Healthy Eating“.

The Public Health Minute is a one-minute audio segment in which the creator and host, Dr. William Latimer, interviews researchers and medical professionals about a wide variety of public health topics and is designed to get practical health advice informed by cutting- edge research to the public.

Media microaggressions against female athletes, female athletes of color, show increase

An online article in Phys.org reveals that microaggressions against female athletes in the media increased by nearly 40 percent from the 2012 Summer Olympic Games to the 2016 Summer Olympic Games.

Female athletes have a history of experiencing microaggressions, such as racism, sexism, the belittling of athletic accomplishments and being the brunt of sexual jokes. Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Journalism also report that  Cynthia Frisby, an associate professor of strategic communication at Mizzou, found evidence of increased microaggressions against female athletes of color compared to white athletes.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-06-media-microaggressions-female-olympic-athletes.html#jCp

Dengel quoted on positive effects of exercise on circulation in Experience Life

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology was recently quoted in the June issue of Experience Life, an online health and fitness magazine, on how exercise improves circulation. “The circulatory system loves exercise,” Dengel says in the article, and explains that exercise makes the circulatory system stronger, more flexible, and more expansive, which in turn boosts athletic performance. The article can be accessed here.

Elsevier Connect features students’ article on effects of school sport participation on academic, social functioning

Minnesota Youth Development Research Group (MYDRG) members. Top (L-R): Carlos Chavez, Wei Song, Jose Palma, Kory Vue, and Rik Lamm. Bottom (L-R): Mireya Smith, Michael Rodriguez, Youngsoon Kang and Özge Erşan

Recently, Elsevier Connect highlighted research conducted by students in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota. The article, “The effects of participation in school sports on academic and social functioning,” was one of three featured in the piece, “Thriving or surviving? Taking a wide angle on mental health.”1 According to the Elsevier Connect, this free article collection explored what’s behind good mental health for Mental Health Awareness Week.

The study

The students examined 2010 Minnesota Student Survey data and found 12th graders who participated in sports had higher GPAs, more favorable perceptions of school safety, and increased perceptions of family and teacher/community support. Psychological foundations of education student (now alumni), Martin Van Boekel, led the project. Quantitative methods in education students, Luke Stanke, Jose R. Palma Zamora, Yoojeong Jang, Youngsoon Kang, and Kyle Nickodem collaborated with Van Boekel on the study. Okan Bulut, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and member of the Centre for Research in Applied Measurement and Evaluation (CRAME) at the University of Alberta, helped guide the students’ work. 

The Minnesota Youth Development Research Group

The researchers met and began work on the project through the Minnesota Youth Development Research Group (MYDRG) which is led by Michael Rodriguez, Campbell Leadership Chair in Education and Human Development and professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota. MYDRG explores methodological and substantive challenges in youth development through positive psychology, ecological perspectives of youth development, and the translation of research to practice.

More information

Read the Elsevier Connect piece.

Read the full study, “The effects of participation in school sports on academic and social functioning.”

  1. Van Boekel, Martin, Bulut, Okan, Stanke, Luke, Palma Zamora, Jose R., Jang, Yoojeong, Kang, Youngsoon, Nickodem, Kyle. (2017). The effects of participation in school sports on academic and social functioning. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Volume 46, September–October 2016, 31–40. doi: /10.1016/j.appdev.2016.05.002

Weiss publishes in The Sage Encyclopedia of Out-of- School Learning

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, published an article, “Positive youth development through sport” in the just-released anthology by Sage on after-school and out-of- school programs related to teaching methods and learning styles. The two-volume series covering over 200 articles documents what the best research has revealed about out-of- school learning—what facilitates or hampers it; where it takes place most effectively; how we can encourage it to develop talents and strengthen communities; and why it matters.

Lewis and colleagues publish in Women’s Health

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, and colleagues (including her advisees Lauren Billing, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate,  and Katie Schuver, Kinesiology Ph.D., 2014 ) have had an article published in Women’s Health.

The article is titled “The relationship between employment status and depression symptomatology among women at risk for postpartum depression.”

OLPD Ph.D. student wins NODA grant for rural student retention research

Keelin Yenney, a Ph.D. student studying higher education in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD),  has been awarded a grant from the National Association for Orientation, Transfer, and Retention (NODA) for her research regarding the retention of rural students.

“Social Capital and Sense of Belonging: Exploring Assigned Academic Advising as a Retention Tool for Rural Students”
The purpose of this study is to explore how rural students experience assigned academic advising as a tool to develop social capital and sense of belonging in an urban college environment and the ways these experiences influence retention.

Tucker Center research cited in article on Meyer case at Iowa

The Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report research series is cited in a Cedar Rapids Gazette article, “After Jane Meyer verdict, UI orders review of employment practices.” Meyer, a former senior Associate Athletics Director, had filed a gender and sexual orientation case against the University.

Kinesiology undergraduate Samantha Mussehl receives UROP award

Samantha Mussehl, an undergraduate student in the School of Kinesiology, has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Samantha’s UROP will examine whether the soleus muscle shows signs of mechanical or neural injury and repair following a hemorrhagic stroke. The project is under the direction of LeAnn Snow, MD, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Division of Physical Therapy. Samantha is advised by Donald Dengel, Ph.D., professor and director of the School’s Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and she is working on a directed study project with him.

The UROP Award offers financial awards to full-time undergraduates for quality research, scholarly, or creative projects that are judged to contribute to the student’s academic development and which are undertaken in collaboration with a faculty sponsor.

Gao and students publish book on technology, physical activity, and health promotion

Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, recently published a book titled “Technology in Physical Activity and Health Promotion” together with his graduate students Jung Eun Lee, Zachary PopeHaichun Sun, and Nan Zeng with Routledge publishers.

Offering a logical and clear critique of technology in physical activity and health promotion, this book will serve as an essential reference for upper-level undergraduates, postgraduate students and scholars working in public health, physical activity and health and kinesiology, and healthcare professionals.

The book is now available on the Routledge website and Amazon.com.

Kihl and colleagues’ article accepted for publication in Social Responsibility Journal

KihllL-prefLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D, associate professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology and co-authors Dr. Mansour Ndiaye (University of Connecticut) and Dr. Janet Fink (University of Massachusetts-Amherst) have had their article, “Corruption’s impact on organizational outcomes,” accepted for publication in Social Responsibility Journal.

The article reports on a model of corruption that was developed measuring the impact of sports corruption on organizational outcomes (i.e., win difference and attendance) and the mediating role of institutional reputation.

Konczak gives invited presentation at Neural Control of Movement meeting in Dublin

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, spoke to an audience of about 150 international neuroscientists at the 27th annual meeting of the Society for Neural Control of Movement in Dublin, Ireland.

Konczak provided an overview of his lab’s research on somatosensory deficits in Parkinson’s disease and dystonia and outlined how these sensory impairments may cause the motor deficits seen in the neurological diseases. He also presented recent work led by Dr. Naveen Elangovan, postdoctoral researcher in the lab, that showed that Parkinsonian symptoms can be improved through a specialized sensory training.

Inoue has article accepted for publication in Journal of Sport Management

image of Yuhei InoueKinesiology assistant professor Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., has had his article, “Sport Spectatorship and Life Satisfaction: A Multi-Country Investigation,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Sport Management. The article reports the findings of two studies demonstrating how engagement in elite and professional sport events, behaviorally through live spectating and psychologically through team identification, is associated with life satisfaction.

The in-press article may be accessed here: Inoue, Y., Sato, M., Filo, K., Du, J., & Funk, D.C. (in press). Sport spectatorship and life satisfaction: A multi-country investigation. Journal of Sport Management.

CEHD research on the development of autism featured in Spectrum

L-R: Jed Elison, Jason Wolff

Jason Wolff, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology’s special education program, was recently featured in a Spectrum article about his research using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in infants whose older siblings have autism. Wolff worked with a national team of researchers, including Jed Elison from the Institute for Child Development, on the study. Wolff and colleagues found that the development of specific brain circuits may predict the severity of repetitive and sensory behaviors in infants who later develop autism.

In the article, Spectrum explains, “repetitive behaviors, such as hand flapping, are a cardinal sign of autism”, and “children with these severe repetitive behaviors often also have unusual sensory features, such as sensitivities to sounds or textures or an insensitivity to pain.”

Wolff expands on this. “They both (repetitive behaviors and unusual sensory features) seem to share a similar relationship with underlying neural circuitry,” he says.

Read the full article.

Weiss to give keynote presentation at Sport Psychology Conference in Switzerland

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, will give the keynote lecture at the Annual Congress of the German Society of Sport Psychology in Bern, Switzerland, on May 25.

The title of her talk is, “Positive youth development through sport and physical activity: Progress, puzzles, and promise.” The Society represents the interests of the sport psychology community inside and outside universities in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria, and its purpose is to promote and develop research, teaching, and applied fields of performance, expertise, and health. In addition to her keynote lecture, Weiss will give a presentation as part of a symposium on Youth Sport titled, “Evaluating impact of physical activity-based positive youth development programs: A tale of two exemplars.”

Yuhei Inoue wins CEHD New Career Excellence Award for 2017

School of Kinesiology assistant professor Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., was presented CEHD’s New Career Excellence Award for 2017 at the college’s annual Assembly and Recognition Ceremony held at the Great Hall in Coffman Union yesterday.

The New Career Excellence Award “recognizes a new CEHD professional who has demonstrated outstanding and innovative academic work and shows great promise in terms of future contributions to the college and the field.”

Dr. Inoue teaches and does research in the sport management emphasis in the School of Kinesiology. He joined the faculty in 2014. His research explores the ways sport makes a positive impact on society and addresses the implications of strategic management issues related to sport organizations and corporate social responsibility initiatives.  For example, he conducted a study in Cambodia to  determine if sport participation that includes both able and disabled participants can create cooperative social relationships that enhance economic and social development. He and a master’s advisee have also conducted research on how social identification through attending sporting events may help increase older adults’ social connections and well-being.

Last fall, Dr. Inoue began working on a Temple University Sport Industry Research Center grant with several colleagues to explore how collegiate athletic departments in the U.S. are organized and operated and how the system could translate to Japan. Only a few Japanese universities have a unified athletics department. Generally their sports teams are privately managed rather than organized under the umbrella of an athletics department. Dr. Inoue believes that this study will help researchers understand collegiate athletics from a broader view, and he has been running case studies with the University of South Carolina, Old Dominion University and the University of Northern Colorado as part of the study.

Dr. Inoue also advises Madeleine Orr, Kinesiology doctoral student who won CEHD’s Three-Minute Thesis competition last month and reprised her presentation at yesterday’s award ceremony.

A contributor to Dr. Inoue’s nomination says, “He exhibits high levels of productivity and quality in scholarship and teaching, and does work that is meaningful and relevant to the human development and societal impact aspects of CEHD. Beyond his academic talents and scholarly expertise, however, I perhaps even more importantly see him as a wonderful colleague who willingly carries his share of responsibility for service work, mentoring, and student advising, represents a positive and collegial presence, and betters our school and college environment.”