Category Archives: Students

C&I graduate student, Kay Rosheim, wins Robert Schreiner Reading Dissertation Fellowship

Kay Rosheim, a Ph.D. candidate in Literacy Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, received the 2016-17 Robert Schreiner Reading Dissertation Fellowship. The $2,500 fellowship is designed to support the candidate’s dissertation research in reading education.   Awardees are selected based of the importance of the research, the clarity with which it is described, the potential the work has for making a significant contribution to the field, and the probability that the research will be completed in a timely manner.

Rosheim is pursuing her Ph.D. while working as a K-6 Literacy Specialist at Forest Hills Elementary in Eden Prairie, uniquely positioning her dissertation research.  Rosheim’s dissertation explores the continuum of quiet in the K-6 classroom, recognizing that the role of silence is a complex process. Through an inquiry of designing and implementing curriculum and pedagogies for an extremely quiet student, Kay aims to acquire new knowledge and practices of instruction that promotes self-efficacy in quiet learners.

Rosheim’s advisor is Associate Professor, Lori Helman.

Learn more about the Ph.D. in Literacy Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Richardson to discuss sustainability education at Institute on the Environment’s 2017 Seminar Series

The U of M’s Institute on the Environment (IonE) is hosting a 2017 Seminar Series, “Frontiers in the Environment.” The series tackles environmental issues in ways that bring people together, showcase new knowledge, and challenge assumptions and practices.

Tiffany Richardson, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and IonE Educator, will be a panel member this Wednesday, April 5, 12:00-12:45 p.m., to discuss “Breaking Boundaries in Sustainability Education.” She’ll be appearing with four other presenters from the U of M to discuss how to tackle obstacles of living sustainably by pushing traditional boundaries and reaching audiences not usually associated with sustainability. Richardson has been using professional sports to promote student learning, behavior change, and fan engagement via Green Teams, composed of students who actively promote a sustainability message at major league sporting events.

Attend the seminar in person, LES R-380, 1954 Buford Ave., St. Paul, or join the YouTube Live here and the Twitter conversation with #Frontiers and @UMNIonE.

On Thursday, April 6, individuals who wish to meet with Richardson and fellow panelists to discuss sustainability ideas in depth will attend the Affiliates April Salon Breakfast on the St. Paul campus.

 

 

 

Kinesiology’s Madeline Czeck awarded UROP to perform research in LIPH lab

Madeline Czeck, an undergraduate student in the School of Kinesiology, has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Maddy’s UROP will examine total and segmental body composition measures of muscle mass, fat mass, bone density of NCAA Division I softball and baseball players using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). In addition, this research project will also compare the effect of positions (i.e., pitcher, catcher, outfielder, and infielder), usage patterns (i.e., throwing arm versus the non-throwing arm) and gender on total and segmental body composition differences. The project is under the direction of Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIPH).

The UROP Award offers financial awards to full-time undergraduates for quality research, scholarly, or creative projects that are judged to contribute to the student’s academic development and which are undertaken in collaboration with a faculty sponsor.

 

Kinesiology’s Madeleine Orr and Morgan Betker awarded wins at CEHD’s Three Minute Thesis competition

image of Morgan Betker and Madelleine Orr, winners at the CEHD 2017 Three Minute Thesis contest
Betker, left, and Orr at 3MT competition

Madeleine Orr and Morgan Betker, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidates and finalists in CEHD’s Research Day Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, won prizes in the Finalist Competition held today, March 28, at the McNamara Alumni Center.

Orr (sport management emphasis, advised by Dr. Yuhei Inoue) was awarded the $500 first prize for her presentation, “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” Betker (exercise physiology emphasis, advised by Dr. Eric Snyder) won the $250 People’s Choice award for her presentation, “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers.

The six finalists from five departments across the college had exactly 3 minutes to explain their research projects in an engaging and easy-to-understand format to a packed room in McNamara.

“Telling a compelling story about your research and its implications in less than 3 minutes is way harder than I thought it was going to be!” said Orr after the event. “But to represent Kinesiology with Morgan, and come away with such great results, was a great experience.”

Betker says, “As researchers, we don’t often get the opportunity to share our passion with people outside of our niche, nor hear others’ perspectives in their chosen emphasis. This competition was an excellent way to not only challenge ourselves and grow professionally, but to broaden our perspectives and find value in the work of fellow graduate students in other fields. I’m very grateful to have been a part of the experience.”

3MT is a worldwide competition that was introduced by the University of Queensland in 2008. This is the second year the college has held the event as part of CEHD Research Day. Judges for today’s event were Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.


Tianou Zhang, Kinesiology PhD candidate, to present at U’s Doctoral Research Showcase April 11

The University’s tenth annual Doctoral Research Showcase will include a presentation by Tianou Zhang, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate and advisee of Li Li Ji, Ph.D., director of the School of Kinesiology.

The Showcase will be held Tuesday, April 11 from 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. in the Great Hall, Coffman Memorial Union.

The goal of the Doctoral Research Showcase is to help doctoral fellows develop their abilities to talk about their research to audiences outside of their disciplines and to gain exposure for their work with key stakeholders.

Mr. Zhang’s research presentation is “Dietary Antioxidant Protection Against Inflammation in Exercise and Obesity.” All Kinesiology colleagues are invited to attend and support Mr. Zhang.

For more information about the event or to view a list of all of this year’s participants, visit: z.umn.edu/drs2017.

Betker and Orr are finalists in CEHD Three Minute Thesis Competition

Morgan Betker
Madeleine Orr

Two Kinesiology doctoral candidates are finalists in CEHD’s Research Day competition, Three Minute Thesis (3MT), which will be held March 28  from 10-11 a.m. in the McNamara Alumni Center Johnson Room.

Morgan Betker (exercise physiology emphasis) and Madeleine Orr (sport management emphasis) will be competing with six doctoral students from across the college for the first prize of $500. Prizes of $250 will go to the runner-up and people’s choice. The finalists were chosen from a preliminary round competition held last week.

Ms. Betker’s presentation is “Cardiovascular Health and Occupational Stress in Police Officers” and Ms. Orr’s presentation is “The rhetoric vs. the reality of sport event legacies.”

3MT is an annual competition held in over 200 universities worldwide. It’s designed to challenge Ph.D. students to present their research in just three minutes in an engaging format that can be understood by an audience with no background in their discipline. The competition is intended to help students develop a presentation on their research and hone their academic communication skills to explain their work effectively to a general audience.

Judges in the CEHD competition are Karen Kaler, University Associate; Mary Tjosvold, local entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian, and CEHD alumna; and Dr. John Wright, professor of African-American and African Studies in the College of Liberal Arts.

Rebecca Distefano awarded Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship

Rebecca Distefano, a Ph.D. student in child psychology at the Institute of Child Development (ICD), was recently awarded the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship (IDF). The IDF is awarded to 21 outstanding Ph.D. students who take part in interdisciplinary research at the University of Minnesota.

The fellowship provides recipients with the opportunity to study and research with faculty at one interdisciplinary research center of their choice. The award includes a stipend of $25,000 for the academic year, tuition for up to 14 graduate credits each semester, and subsidized health insurance through the Graduate Assistant Health Plan.

Varma, student present research on the origins of numerical abilities to Royal Society

Sashank Varma, associate professor and coordinator for the Department of Educational Psychology’s psychological foundations of education program, and doctoral student, Soo-hyun Im, recently traveled to London for the Royal Society Meeting on the Origins of Numerical Abilities, a scientific discussion about how when humans acquire numerical competence, we build upon an inherited cognitive foundation. At the meeting, Varma and Im presented their research projects entitled Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students1 and From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis.2

Co-authors of Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement include: Purav Patel, a doctoral student in psychological foundations of education and Rachel Voit, a Macalester College student at the time of data collection and now a masters student in social work.

The Royal Society is a fellowship of many of the world’s most eminent scientists and is the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.

  1.  Varma, S., Voit, R., Im, S.-h., & Patel, P. J. (2017, February). Mathematical insight predicts mathematical achievement in college students. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.
  1. Im, S.-h., & Varma, S. (2017, February). From number sense to arithmetic sense: A theoretical and empirical synthesis. Poster presented at the Royal Society Meeting on The Origins of Numerical Abilities, London, UK.

Natalie Low awarded Anne D. Pick Award for an Outstanding Child Psychology Major

Natalie Low receiving Anne D. Pick Award for an Outstanding Child Psychology Major

Every year, the Institute of Child Development (ICD) awards one undergraduate child psychology student with the Anne D. Pick Award for an Outstanding Child Psychology Major. The recipient demonstrates excellence in research and academics in the area of child development.

This year’s recipient is Natalie Low, who studies emotion regulation (ER) at ICD. Low currently conducts research in the Cognitive Development and Neuroimaging (CDN) Lab with ICD Professor Kathleen Thomas, Ph.D.,  on how children learn different strategies from the environment to help them regulate their emotions.

Along with an inscribed plaque, Low will receive a scholarship of $500 and up to $250 in travel/ research funds. Below, Low discusses how she developed an interest in child psychology and her post-graduation plans.

What made you want to study child psychology? 

I came across the child psychology major by chance. While applying to transfer to the University of Minnesota, I was unsure of what I wanted to major in and as I was filling out my application, I chanced upon the major. I knew that I wanted to continue pursuing something related to the field of psychology or the social sciences and that I wanted to work with children. Looking back, this decision has been one filled with great reward and tremendous challenge, but it is something that I don’t regret.

What kind of research are you involved in? 

As an undergraduate research assistant in the CDN Lab, I investigated the role of early experience in brain development. As part of an independent study, I have developed a coding scheme, with the assistance of Dr. Thomas, to examine attentional strategies used by preschool children to regulate their emotions. I also have worked with ICD Associate Professor Melissa Koenig, Ph.D., in the Early Language and Experience Lab (ELEL), where I examined how preschool children reason about the intentions and actions of people. Currently, I am assisting Dr. Thomas in a separate study examining social and emotional development in children who have had a hemipherectomy (half of their brain removed).

What do you find most interesting about child development? 

You can never have two children who are exactly alike. Child development is continuously affected by biological factors, environmental factors, and even an amalgamation and interaction of both. I find it interesting how even under similar conditions, two children will be different from one another, especially in the research area I am interested in, emotional development, whereby children may use similar strategies for regulation.

What are your plans after graduation? 

My coursework, clinical experience and research experiences have inspired me to attend graduate school in developmental psychology. I have received numerous opportunities to study cognitive development in children, but still continue to find it intriguing, especially in its relation to emotional development. Ultimately, I hope to attend graduate school to attain the skills necessary for a career as a qualified and inquisitive developmental researcher and to continue to contribute and create greater awareness and understanding of child development.

PAEL researchers will present next week at SHAPE America National Convention

Researchers from the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL) in the School of Kinesiology will give six presentations and be included as coauthors on two other presentations at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention in Boston, MA, from March 14th to 18th. PAEL Director Zan Gao, Ph.D., and Ph.D. candidates June Lee and Zachary Pope, Ph.D. student Nan Zeng, and undergraduate student Kalli Fautsch will be presenting. Their presentations are listed below.

Gao, Z., Leininger, B., Schulz, C., Bronfort, G., Evans, R., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., & Haas, M. (2017, March). Relationships between physical activity and low back pain in adolescents
Fautsch, K., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Exercise modalities on physical activity and behavior in ASD children.
Lee, J., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Effect of home-based Exergaming on preschool children’s cognitive function and cardiorespiratory fitness.
Li, X., Peng, Q., Tan, J., Yang, H., He, W., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Relationships among Chinese college children’s motives and physical activity behavior.
Peng, Q., Li, X., Tan, J., Yang, H., He, W., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Associations among college students’ physical activity, sedentary time and health.
Pope, Z., & Gao, Z., (2017, March). Effectiveness of smartphone-based physical activity intervention on college student health: Randomized-controlled trial.
Pope, Z., Lee, J., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Validity of smartwatches in assessing energy expenditure and heart rate.
Zeng, N., Lee, J., Pope, Z., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Comparison of physiological and psychological outcomes between normal weight and overweight/obese college students during exergaming.

Kinesiology Student Council awarded grant monies to host Kinesiology Research Day

The Kinesiology Student Council has been awarded over $900 combined in grant monies to host the 2nd Annual Kinesiology Research Day on April 21, 2017, in 400 Suite Walter Library. These monies came from two sources: A Minnesota Student Association’s Event Grant and a CEHD GradSEHD Cohort Development Grant.
Kinesiology Research Day promises to be an opportunity for faculty members, staff, graduate students and undergraduate students from the School of Kinesiology and relevant departments to interact in an interdisciplinary forum, exchange ideas and present their achievements. Notably, this is the second consecutive year the Council has acquired funding for this annual event, with the Council intending to once again make Kinesiology Research Day a first-class affair.

OLPD graduate student receives Mestenhauser Student Award for Excellence

Takehito Kamata, a Ph.D. student (higher education track) in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), is a recipient of the Mestenhauser Student Award for Excellence in Campus Internationalization recognizing outstanding student contributions to international education. Kamata will receive his award at a ceremony held on March 3, 2017.

 

Read more and RSVP.

Health, sport and recreation career fair to be held Feb. 8

Career fair photoThe CEHD Health, Sport and Recreation Career Fair  on Feb. 8 at the U’s Recreation and Wellness Center is specifically designed for Kinesiology, Sport Management and Recreation, Park and Leisure Studies students looking for internships, full-time positions and graduate program information. Fifteen organizations from diverse areas such as Allina Health, U of M Athletics, and the YMCA and YWCA, will be there to recruit and share information about their organization. Visit GoldPASS to see all of the employers who will be attending. No registration is required.

REC students involved in Resilient Communities Project (RCP)

Under the leadership of Tony Brown, Ph.D., Recreation Administration instructor in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Department of Recreational Sports, students participated in this year’s Resilient Communities Project (RCP), working with the City of Brooklyn Park. The students enrolled in the Recreation Administration major applied their knowledge and skills to a real-world project with a community partner. They worked with the City’s in its effort to address nature-based recreation opportunities and equitable use of athletic fields.

The RCP is an organization dedicated to connecting communities in Minnesota with diverse expertise of University of Minnesota faculty and students to address pressing local issues in ways that advance sustainability and resilience.

Students in Sport Management class work with Forest Lake school on best practices for developing athletic program

Ryan Santoso (left) and Justin Juenemann presented their recommendations.

Students in a Sport Management course in the School of Kinesiology had a real-world opportunity to help a K-12 school in Forest Lake consider ways to develop and expand an athletic program for their students in grades 6-12.

The students in SMGT 3881W, a capstone course for undergraduates taught by Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor in the School, collaborated with Lakes International Language Academy (LILA) to come up with best practices for an athletics department operations manual that covered areas such as policies, recruiting and training coaches, facilities, and marketing. The students worked in groups and presented their plans to school director  Shannon Peterson and athletics and activities director Jenni Muras.

“This is the students’ opportunity to demonstrate that they are prepared academically and professionally as graduates to contribute meaningful work for real-world sports concerns,” said Kihl. “I set the expectations high. And every time, these students amaze me,.”

“We were thrilled to participate in this capstone project,” Muras said. “With Dr. Kihl’s expert guidance, the University students provided useful information that reflects our school’s mission, values, and International Baccalaureate focus. We’re looking forward to continuing the relationship with the U.”

LILA is a public K-12 Mandarin and Spanish language immersion school.

Upcoming spring 2017 career events

Career Services event photoAs the CEHD class of 2017 plans for their next steps after graduation, CEHD Career Services is there to support them with several career events planned during spring term.

In February, undergraduate and graduate students have the opportunity for top Twin Cities employers to review their resume. The Health, Sport, and Recreation Career Fair brings several employers to campus who are interested in hiring CEHD students. Students may also hone their interview skills in practice interviews with employers. This is great preparation for the U of M Job and Internship Fair at the end of February.

In March, employers from a variety of industries will be on campus to talk about careers related to youth studies and family social science majors.

In April, the annual MN Education Job Fair is the chance for teacher education students to meet and interview with districts across the state.

Global Seminar students blog from Kenya

Over winter break, Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, is teaching a Global Seminar course in Nairobi, Kenya, as part of the U of M’s Learning Abroad programs. The course, titled “Empowering Girls Through Sport,” explores how in the Kenyan culture physical activity is used as a gateway to many aspects of life and how it can empower youth, especially girls.

Students, who are traveling in Kenya from December 26, 2016, to January 16, 2017, are blogging about their experiences: www.umninkenya2017.edublogs.org

 

Muñoz featured in MPR news story on challenges Hispanic students face in graduating from college

Munoz photoMinerva Muñoz, director of TRIO Student Support Services, was recently featured in an MPR news piece on the barriers Hispanic students face in obtaining college degrees.

Read the full article. 

Sport Finance students present to Beyond Walls staff and board members

Students in Dr. Yuhei Inoue‘s KIN 5421 Sport Finance class presented their final Revenue Generation Projects to three staff members of the non-profit organization Beyond Walls: Jazmin Danielson, Executive Director; Sammy Loeks-Davis, Program Director; and Karen VanderBosch, Board Member. Each group presented research and recommendations about how the organization can spread awareness for its campaign and build revenue.

Beyond Walls is a program that  supports students in finding and graduating from their best-fit post-secondary pursuit using squash, academics, mentoring and life skills development. Their goal is to become a Twin Cities leader in promoting academic excellence, healthy lifestyles, and access to meaningful opportunities for all youth.

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PAEL featured in CE+HD Connect Magazine

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Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL), is featured in the current issue of the College of Education and Human Develpment’s CE+HD Connect Magazine.

Gao and his research team use technology to increase health in children and adults by encouraging movement. Read the entire story titled “Motivation to Move!