CEHD News Students

CEHD News Students

Students present research at 2018 GSRD

The 18th Annual Educational Psychology Graduate Student Research Day (GSRD) was held on March 2, 2018 to celebrate outstanding student accomplishments in research. GSRD provides an opportunity for graduate students to present their research and to be recognized by peers and faculty.

The event took place in the Mississippi Room in Coffman Memorial Union and featured four student research paper presentations and 34 posters on display with students available for Q&A. Faculty and peers were able to walk around and learn more about the variety of research taking place within the department.

GSRD is a well-attended and well-recognized event at the University of Minnesota, and the Department of Educational Psychology continues to be pleased with the excellent work students produce on their research accomplishments.

View the 2018 GSRD program for more information on presentation and program topics.

Jang receives AERA-REAPA’s 2018 outstanding dissertation award

Sung Tae Jang has been selected to receive the 2018 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Special Interest Group: Research on the Education of Asian and Pacific Americans (REAPA) for his dissertation, Student Experiences and Educational Outcomes of Southeast Asian Female Secondary School Students in the United States: A Critical Quantitative Intersectionality Analysis.

This award recognizes a scholar whose dissertation has had a significant impact on our understanding of Asian American and/or Pacific Islanders in education and will be presented in April at the annual business meeting in New York City.

Sung Tae is a doctoral student in the educational policy and leadership track in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD).

 

 

School of Kinesiology alumnus featured in Florida Today

Matthew Duffy, a 2013 alumni of the School of Kinesiology, was profiled in Florida Today. Duffy received his B.S. in kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise science. He is currently a clinical integration specialist at Health First’s Pro Health and Fitness Center in Viera, Florida. Duffy works with a variety of patients, including cardiac, post-rehab and people with disabilities, and conducts physical and postural assessments, creates strength training workouts and program design, and assists in flexibility training and assisted stretching.

 

Kim and Yoo win Cutting Edge Awards at the Academy of Human Resource Development annual conference

Sehoon Kim, assistant professor (pictured), and Sangok Yoo, a 3rd year doctoral student studying human resource development, both received Cutting Edge awards from the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) for their outstanding papers at the 2018 annual conference held February 14-17 in Richmond, VA.

Workaholics, Addiction, and Motivation: A Critical Review and Implications for HRD by Sehoon Kim

Knowledge Creation Practices of Teachers in South Korea and the United States: A Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling Analysis by Sangok Yoo (University of Minnesota), Shinhee Jeong (Texas A&M University), Ji Hoon Song (Hanyang University), and Sanghoon Bae (Sungkyunkwon University)

 

Q&A with Britta Bresina, special education Ph.D. student

Britta Bresina

Why do some students continue to struggle with reading, even after years of intensive intervention? A former teacher, Ph.D. student Britta Bresina wants to find out what can be done about it.

We asked Britta some questions about her experience as special education student, as well are her work and research. Here’s what she said:

What is most exciting about your work and research?

“I honestly believe it will have a positive impact on the lives of many students who struggle to learn. Being a teacher, I was able to both have and directly see the impact I made on the lives of my students. It was very powerful. When I decided to leave my classroom to come back to school full-time, I struggled a bit knowing that I was walking away from that environment. However, like one of my students told me, I have the potential to help even more students by being a researcher and teaching future teachers. That is pretty awesome.”

What have you most enjoyed about your experience in the special education program?

“I have greatly enjoyed how closely I get to work with the faculty we have in our program. They are approachable, a wealth of knowledge, and really want to help graduate students in this program grow. I have also enjoyed the exposure I’ve gotten to the greater field of special education researchers through attending conferences and other opportunities.”

Do you have a productivity secret that helps you get through school?

“Read a lot! The more you read, the more questions you will have that will help you generate research ideas. Also, get some friends together and start a writing group where you analyze scientific writing, set goals, and hold each other accountable. Finally, like all special educators know, you must monitor your progress toward your goals!”

What’s your favorite restaurant near campus/in the Twin Cities?

“I have many. The best place to celebrate the end of a semester is Loring Pasta Bar – awesome atmosphere and unique dishes. The best place to grab lunch or coffee with friends is Purple Onion – so good! The best happy hour is at Kafe 421! All excellent.”

NFL Players Association presents to Sport Management students

nfl
Left to right: Ji Wu, Christopher Nettleton, Leo Lewis, Carl Francis, Jo Ann Buysse, Don Davis, George Atallah

As Minneapolis hosts Super Bowl LII, on Tuesday, January 30, over 100 School of Kinesiology sport management students had the opportunity to listen to some of the top executives in the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA). Students from Dr. Jo Ann Buysse’s Sport in a Diverse Society class, Christopher Nettleton’s Sport Marketing class, and Ji Wu’s Sport Business class attended this event. Not only did they learn about the NFLPA, they also had the chance to ask questions about important social, medical, and business issues affecting the players in the NFL.

The National Football League Players Association (NFLPA) is the union for professional football players in the National Football League. Established in 1956, the NFLPA has a long history of assuring proper recognition and representation of players’ interests. The NFLPA has shown that it will do whatever is necessary to assure that the rights of players are protected—including ceasing to be a union, if necessary, as it did in 1989. In 1993, the NFLPA was again officially recognized as the union representing the players, and negotiated a landmark Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) with the NFL. The current CBA will govern the sport through 2020.

The NFLPA was represented by Carl Francis, Director of Communications, Don Davis, Sr., Director of Player Affairs, and Senior Advisor to the NFLPA Executive Director, and George Atallah, Assistant Executive Director of External Affairs.

Left to right: Ji Wu, Christopher Nettleton, Leo Lewis, Carl Francis, Jo Ann Buysse, Don Davis, George Atallah

Inoue secures funding for Japan College Sport Research program

image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, received 20k funding from the Sport Industry Research Center at Temple University.

For the last two years, Inoue is part of the Japan College Sport Research program, where he and the project leads, Dr. Jermey Jordan and Dr. Daniel Funk at Temple University are assisting the University of Tsukuba, Japan with its effort to create a new athletic department and disseminate its newly adopted model of athletics administration to other universities across Japan. The project funds Inoue received as co-investigator will be used to deliver workshops for Japanese university administrators and to develop the organizational structure for the new athletic department at Tsukuba.

For more information about this project and Inoue’s involvement, see The Japan Times article “Japanese collegiate sports study ends Phase 1.”

Kinesiology’s Betker and Orr involved in 3MT® events


In preparation for this year’s 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition, CEHD is hosting a Mentoring Workshop on February 1. Last year’s University-wide 3MT winner Madeleine Orr, a sport management doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology will serve as a panelist at this event.

In addition, Orr and Kinesiology’s Morgan Betker, doctoral student with a focus on exercise physiology and previous winners of the CEHD 3MT competition are asked to be judges for the preliminary round of the competition, which will be held on Monday, February 26 and Thursday, March 1 of this year.

Madeleine Orr
Madeleine Orr
Morgan Betker
Morgan Betker

Sport Management Graduate Student Madeleine Orr interviewed for CEHD’s Vision 2020

Madeleine Orr, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology with the emphasis on sport management was recently interviewed for the CEHD Vision 2020 blog about her research on the economic, social and environmental impact of large-scale international sporting events.

As Minneapolis prepares for the upcoming Super Bowl events, Orr talks in the article titled “Does Hosting Sports Events like the Olympic Games or Super Bowl Really Benefit Cities?“, about how Minneapolis prepares for the upcoming “Big Game” events, as well as the impact that hosting the Olympics can have on cities.

 

Kinesiology student and goaltender Sidney Peters nominated for 2018 Hockey Humanitarian Award

Photo courtesy of University of Minnesota Athletics.

Sidney Peters, a School of Kinesiology senior majoring in kinesiology and minoring in biology, and Gophers Women’s Ice Hockey goaltender is one of 11 nominees for the 2018 Hockey Humanitarian Award. The award is presented by the Hockey Humanitarian Award Foundation and is presented annually to a hockey student-athlete who makes significant contributions to both his/her team and community through leadership and volunteerism.

With over 785 volunteer hours logged, Peters is involved in many community outreach volunteer activities. She is a certified Emergency Medical Technician and volunteers for both the University of Minnesota EMS and the Rush-Copley Emergency Department in Aurora, IL. In the summer of 2016, Peters traveled to Haiti with Project Mediashare, an organization dedicated to providing and empowering Haitians with quality health care. While she was there, she volunteered at Hospital Bernard Mevs, which is the country’s only critical care and trauma hospital. Peters has also volunteered as the head goalie coach for Hockey Ministries International seasonal sports camps in Chicago.

During her Gopher career, she has given back to the community by volunteering locally with HopeKids, Special Olympics Minnesota, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital.

Finalists for the Hockey Humanitarian Award will be announced in February, and the 2018 recipient will be honored on April 6 as part of the NCAA Men’s Frozen Four weekend in St. Paul, MN.

For more information on Peters and her nomination, visit gophersports.com.

 

Q&A with Hannah Boldt, CSPP student

Hannah Boldt head shot
Hannah Boldt

Hannah Boldt didn’t always know she wanted to be a counselor. Initially, she pursued a degree as a saxophone player. She switched her major to international studies with the intention of working in international aid in West Africa, however upon graduation found a career in the software and I.T. sector where she worked for four years. Now a second-year counseling and student personnel psychology (CSPP) student, Hannah is excited to finally be on her path to becoming a counselor or therapist.

She says it was her own winding road to find her passion that drew her to the field of career counseling and personal therapy.

“I want to normalize the student experience of not knowing what to do, or graduating in something and not using it,” Hannah says.

We sat down with Hannah and asked her a few questions about her experience as a CSPP student and what insights she’d like to share with other prospective students. Here’s what she said:

What surprised you along the way?

“I was surprised at the amount of emotional energy it takes to be a counselor. I knew what I was getting into, but my expectations weren’t prepared for the amount of personal reflection and growth I would be doing. Overall, I’ve experienced a lot of emotional growth.”

What’s something you’ve most enjoyed about your experience?

“I was ready to be back in school and learning, after taking 4 years off in between my undergrad and master’s. I came in with the expectation to be a sponge and take in everything. It’s been so exciting and exhilarating to learn more about the field of psychology and counseling.”

How would you describe the student experience and what does that mean to you?

“In CEHD as a whole, I’ve been impressed with the opportunities for engagement. Every day, there’s a different talk or seminar going on and it feels like there’s a spirit of engagement and learning. Sometimes I think I signed up for a little too much. I’m working three jobs and go to school full time.”

How have your professors helped you along the way?

“All three of my professors in the CSPP program have gone above and beyond their role. It seems like they take a vested interest in my growth as an individual and professional. I work with Dr. Ohrtman doing clinical placements and she is communicative and dedicated to connecting, networking, and helping me professionally. My adviser, Dr. Howard, helped me with the emotional journey transitioning from work and adjusting to a graduate program. She also suggested that my practicum be with Student Counseling Services, which has challenged me to grow outside my comfort zone. Lastly, Dr. Berger has been always accessible and an excellent advocate to better the program.”

What would you like prospective students to know?

“Grad school is tough. Also, it’s incredibly worthwhile. I’ve been challenged to grow as a person and define my values and what I stand for. In the counseling program, I appreciate the advocacy element. It’s not just having these values, but the responsibility to take action. You have to be prepared to do emotional work and self reflection. As a result, you will grow as an individual and come into your own.”

How has your cohort helped you along the way?

“My cohort has been so helpful and important to me. There’s 35 of us, but we have a strong bond because we are all going through the process of discovering ourselves and the profession together. We all came in with different experiences, and it’s helpful to have people to lean on when things get tough and to normalize the experience.”

What are you looking forward to with graduation?

“Having a job that I look forward to going to and getting paid for something I love doing, is what I’m most excited for. I’m ready to use what I’ve learned and put it into practice. It’s great to feel like I’ve arrived at what feels like my ‘calling’ after 27 years of wondering what I was meant to do as a professional.”

This post was originally written by Ciara Metzger.

 

Kinesiology’s Morgan Betker nominated for Midwest Association of Graduate Schools Excellence in Teaching Award

Morgan Betker

Morgan Betker, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, was nominated by the U of M Graduate School for the prestigious Midwest Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) Excellence in Teaching Award. As the only doctoral student nominated, Betker will represent the U of M at MAGS’ 2018 regional competition. The award will be presented at the MAGS 74rd Annual Meeting, April 4-6, 2018, in Grand Rapids, MI.

MAGS Excellence in Teaching Award recognizes and encourages graduate students for future service as college and university faculty. It supports the Council of Graduate Schools’ (CGS) efforts to promote Preparing Future Faculty to meet needs in academia.

Betker is pursuing her Ph.D. in Kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise physiology, advised by Dr. Beth Lewis.

 

 

Grad students present interdisciplinary research ideas in KIN 8980

For their final project, students in KIN 8980 – Graduate Research Seminar in Kinesiology presented ideas for research projects “that bridge” across different School of Kinesiology emphasis areas.

KIN 8980 is required for all M.S./M.A. and Ph.D. students, and covers topics such as responsible conduct of research and proposal design. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School, taught the course this fall.

During the semester, students discussed the wide spectrum of faculty and student research activities across the department. They then were divided into teams to design potential interdisciplinary research projects to present to the class, and face critical questions from their audience.

Here are the presentations (YouTube playlist):

 

 

Graduate School announces Kinesiology Ph.D. Madeline Orr winner of University-wide 3MT® Competition

Madeleine Orr accepts her prize with School of Kinesiology supporters. From left, Nina Wang, graduate student coordinator; Dr. Michael Wade , DGS; Dr. Beth Lewis, director of the School of Kinesiology; Orr; and Dr. Yuhei Inoue, Orr’s adviser.

Congratulations to Madeleine Orr, Kinesiology Ph.D. student in the Sport Management emphasis,  who won the Second Annual University-wide 3MT® Competition held December 1. The competition, sponsored by the Graduate School, featured finalists from collegiate- and campus-level competitions. Orr will represent the University of Minnesota at the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) 3-Minute Thesis competition in Spring 2018. She also was awarded a $500 prize.

The competition was covered by the Star Tribune in the December 18 Variety section.

The 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition that challenges students to communicate the significance of their projects without the use of props or industry jargon, in just three minutes. The exercise is designed to develop academic, presentation, and research communication skills along with the ability to quickly explain research in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

Orr’s presentation is titled “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” She placed first in CEHD’s 3MT® Competition last spring. She is advised by sport management assistant professor Yuhei Inoue.

 

Panel discussion on challenges, future landscape of Twin Cities sports industry featured in Minneapolis Spokesman-Review

A November 8 panel discussion at TCF Bank Stadium, “Challenges and Future Landscape of the Twin Cities Sports Industry,” was covered by the Minneapolis Spokesman-Review. Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-coordinator of the event, was quoted, along with representatives from local sports teams.

Their comments and concerns ranged from how the availability of big data drives the decision-making process to how social media has made information on players and teams available to fans instantly, making games “live events.” With six professional teams in the metropolitan area, the competition for attracting fans can be challenging. The Spokesman-Review reporter asked the panelists about efforts to increase fan diversity.  All pointed to efforts to improve outreach, but “there’s room for growth” said Bryan Donaldson, Minnesota Twins Senior Community Relations director.

 

New Health and Wellness Promotion minor to be offered next spring

The School of Kinesiology is offering a new all-University undergraduate minor in Health and Wellness Promotion starting in Spring 2018. Students will study the effects of physical activity and recreation in terms of community, individual health and overall wellness. Focusing on the health, physical activity, and nutrition in the context of society, they will learn how to create and utilize programs that promote physical activity, leisure and wellness. The minor will prepare students for a variety of career paths in allied health, industry, business, teaching, and community service. 

“We are very excited to offer the new Health and Wellness Promotion Minor.  There is increased attention on promoting health and wellness as a strategy to prevent chronic disease, and our hope is that this minor will help undergraduates gain a stronger understanding of how physical activity, recreation, wellness, and nutrition can be promoted in their professional career.”  

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director in the School of Kinesiology

This interdisciplinary minor is a campus-wide program, open to all undergraduate students regardless of college or major. Detailed program information and how to apply can be found on the Health and Wellness Promotion minor’s webpage.

LaVoi to speak at Gustavus Adolphus on Nov. 13

Gustavus Adolphus College alumna and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., will speak at her alma mater on Monday, November 13, on “Current Research on Girls and Women in Sport.” Her presentation will be held in Nobel Hall 201 at 5:30 p.m. Lavoi is also co-director of the School’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport.

Kinesiology undergraduate Elisheva Savvateev receives UROP award

Elisheva Savvateev, an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Thomas Stoffregen, Ph. D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, supervises her project, “The driver passenger effect in head mounted virtual reality.” Continue reading “Kinesiology undergraduate Elisheva Savvateev receives UROP award”

2017-18 China Champions arrive at the U of M for a year of study and cultural experiences

Left to right: Fei Xie 谢菲 (Rhythmic Gymnastics), ShuJiao Jin 金淑娇 (Judo),  Wen Tong 佟文 (Judo), YiLin Yang 杨伊琳 (Gymnastics), and YaFei Chu 禇亚飞 (Race Walking)

The School of Kinesiology and the University of Minnesota welcome this year’s China Champions, the fourth cohort of world-class athletes from China traveling to the U.S. to experience a year of study at the University of Minnesota.

This year’s students include a gymnast, two judokas, a race walker, and a rhythmic gymnast. The athletes won championships spanning national, international and Olympic competitions. Most of the athletes have completed their competitive careers and now work in the China Sport Administration or are coaches.

During the year, the China Champions will attend specially designed courses in the School of Kinesiology, including academic seminars, workshops, and classes in English as a Learned Language. Athletes will also visit Minnesota cultural sites and become familiar with the Twin Cities. The China Champions are available to visit classes around the U and share their personal experiences in training and achieving elite world championship status in their sport.

“The China Champions Program has been a truly wonderful partnership between University of Minnesota and Beijing Sport University,” says Jean Quam, dean of the College of Education and Human Development. “With each year, the program strengthens our international relationships and the University’s global visibility and collaboration.”

The University of Minnesota hosts the annual China Champions Program (CCP) to foster an exchange of culture, education and sport. Led by the School of Kinesiology in collaboration with Beijing Sport University and supported by the China Scholarship Council, CCP is a unique global collaboration that provides mutual benefits for Chinese athletes and University faculty, staff and students.

Read about these China Champions accomplishments.

Inoue quoted in The Japan Times on college sports

 image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an article in The Japan Times, Japan’s largest English-language newspaper.

Inoue helped to organize former U of M athletic director Joel Maturi’s visit to Japan, where Maturi talked about the pros and cons of collegiate athletics in the United States. In the article titled, “Former Minnesota athletics chief Joel Maturi says Japan can benefit from college sports overhaul,” Inoue mentions the positive role collegiate sport can have for student communities.