Category Archives: Topics

Konczak, Tseng publish article in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, is a co-author on an article recently published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.  Age-Related Decline of Wrist Position Sense and its Relationship to Specific Physical Training” examines the effects of aging on proprioception (a person’s perception of their limb and body positions necessary for motor control) by comparing wrist acuity in older and younger populations, and explores the effects of  training or regular physical activity on preserved wrist proprioception.

Konczak’s former advisee Yu-Ting Tseng, Ph.D. (2017), is also an author on the article. She is currently a post-doc at the Division of Child Health Research, Institute of Population Health Sciences in the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in Zhunan, Taiwan.

 

NYTimes quotes Kane on Thomas, Liberty sale

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is quoted in a New York Times article, “With the Liberty for Sale, What’s Next for Isiah Thomas?” Kane “said that providing team stability and being committed to making the Liberty a world-class organization ‘does not excuse his past behavior.'”

Raymond-Pope, Dengel, and Bosch publish in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Kinesiology doctoral student Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on an article written with kinesiology professor Donald Dengel, Ph.D., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., and published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 

The article, “Total and Segmental Body Composition Examination in Collegiate Football Players Using Multifrequency Bia and Dxa,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between two different means of measurement used in assessing total and segmental percent body fat.

Raymond-Pope is currently advised by Dengel, and Bosch is a former advisee who graduated with his Ph.D. in kinesiology in 2014. Dengel is the director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology in the School of Kinesiology.

 

LaVoi and Baeth publish in The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport in the School of Kinesiology, and Anna Baeth, Kinesiology Ph.D.student and advisee of Lavoi, have published a chapter in the The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018. The article, “Women and Sports Coaching,” addresses the ways scholarship can be used to inform and influence the goal to increase the number of women coaching sports, currently in the minority around the world.

 

Vavrus and Demerath were plenary speakers at CIES

Dr. Frances VavrusFran Vavrus,  professor, and Peter Demerath, associate professor, in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), were both plenary speakers at the Comparative and International Education Fall Symposium held on October 26-27 at George Mason University. Their panels addressed the theme of the symposium, Interrogating and Innovating CIE Research, by focusing on the legacies of colonialism in educational research and on methodologies that offer alternative approaches to knowledge production. OLPD alumna Laura Willemsen and Ph.D. student Richard Bamattre also presented a paper at the conference on their innovative approaches to teaching comparative education at UM.

Frayeh, Lewis publish in Psychology of Sport and Exercise

Frayeh
Lewis

Amanda Frayeh, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology 2015 graduate, is lead author on an article she recently published with Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology. The article, which was based on Frayeh’s dissertation study, is titled “The effect of mirrors on women’s state body image responses to yoga,” and was published this month in Psychology of Sport and Exercise.  The study examined the effect of mirrors on women’s state body image and appearance comparisons during yoga. Lewis was Frayeh’s doctoral adviser.

Frayeh is currently an adjunct lecturer in the School of Kinesiology.

Kinesiology master’s student Joey Kronzer presents at AASP conference through COGS Travel Grant award

Joey KronzerJoey Kronzer, a School of Kinesiology second year master’s student in the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab, presented his research, “Using E-Prime 2.0 to develop sport-specific video analysis training protocols,” at the 32nd Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference (AASP) held Oct. 18–Oct. 21 in Orlando, FL. Kronzer presented and attended at the conference through a travel grant award from the Council of Graduate Students (COGS).

Kronzer is an advisee of Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D.

 

NIH awards grant to Konczak lab to develop technology for treating a voice disorder

Jürgen Konczk, Ph.D.
Arash Mahnan, Ph.D. student

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology is the principal investigator on an NIH funded grant program administered through the University’s Office of Discovery and Translation that seeks to promote new therapies for rare diseases. The project will design and build a device that will improve the symptoms of a voice disorder called spasmodic dysphonia (SD).

People with SD experience involuntary spasms of the laryngeal musculature that leads to a strained or choked speech. There is no cure for the disease and speech therapy is ineffective. The device will alter how it feels when one speaks. The idea behind the technology is that this sensory trick will help patients to improve their voice quality.  The device development and its testing will be conducted in Konczak’s Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory.

Arash Mahnan, biomedical engineer and doctoral student in the HSC lab will serve as primary research assistant for this project.

 

LaVoi to speak at Gustavus Adolphus on Nov. 13

Gustavus Adolphus College alumna and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., will speak at her alma mater on Monday, November 13, on “Current Research on Girls and Women in Sport.” Her presentation will be held in Nobel Hall 201 at 5:30 p.m. Lavoi is also co-director of the School’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport.

LaVoi to participate in CEHD Alumni and Graduate Networking Event on Nov. 9

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, will participate in a speaking panel at a CEHD Alumni and Graduate Networking Event on Thursday, November 9, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at McNamara Alumni Center, University Hall.  The event, titled “Blaze Your Trail: Crafting a Career with Passion and Innovation,” features CEHD alumni who have forged unique career paths outside their degree programs.  The panel will share their stories and ideas on channeling creativity into professional success.

The event is geared to CEHD graduate and professional students, and an RSVP required. See more details here.

Seashore gives keynote at Nordic Educational Conference

Karen Seashore, Regents professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), was in Norway last month, where she worked with school district leaders and school development agencies, gave a keynote presentation at the Nordic Educational Conference, and presented to 130 participants in a school leader preparation program.

 

Kinesiology undergraduate Elisheva Savvateev receives UROP award

Elisheva Savvateev, an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Thomas Stoffregen, Ph. D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, supervises her project, “The driver passenger effect in head mounted virtual reality.” Continue reading

Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI) launching e-book series

With pleasure I introduce the Program Evaluation Series, an occasional publication of the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI), which has its home in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD) at the University of Minnesota. Owing to the lengthy history of its evaluation training programs (extending back to the late 1960s when the field originated), the University of Minnesota has a strong reputation for evaluation, both nationally and internationally. For over two decades, MESI has sponsored exceptional professional development on program evaluation* and provided graduate students hands-on opportunities to hone their skills on evaluation projects in a variety of organizations. This new endeavor, the Program Evaluation Series, seeks to broaden the number of people who can benefit from MESI activities by providing high quality, up-to-date, and affordable materials on critical developments in the field.

Why now? There are three reasons we are launching the e-book series at
this time:

  • As the field of evaluation continues to grow around the world, it increasingly relies on on-line electronic materials to keep people current. The benefit of a series of e-books is clear since these books can be downloaded and re-produced for only the cost of the printing or formally printed for a nominal fee.
  • The practice of program evaluation is a growing activity internationally, and the number of novice evaluators and people conducting evaluations who do not consider themselves professional evaluators is expanding. Knowing that only a small number of colleagues nationally and globally are able to attend trainings in person, this series of e-books will enable MESI to provide useful materials to a broader array of individuals engaged in the field.
  • An e-book series provides a vehicle for dispersing innovative evaluation content stemming both from academic settings like universities and, equally important, from the world of practice, including the multiple communities in which evaluators ply their trade. Practicing evaluators, many of whom write weekly or monthly blogs, routinely develop materials that they would like to share widely. The Program Evaluation Series provides a mechanism for such dissemination.

We hope you find this publication of value to your evaluation practice and sincerely invite your feedback (mesi@umn.edu) and suggestions for additional volumes.

Jean A. King, PhD
Director, MESI

Kinesiology alumna Yu-Ting Tseng awarded post-doc at National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan

Yu-Ting Tseng, Ph.D., 2017 graduate of the School of Kinesiology in the Biomechanics and Neuromotor Control emphasis, has been awarded a post-doc position in the Division of Child Health Research, Institute of Population Health Sciences in the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in Zhunan, Taiwan, starting in November. She will be conducting a study on the effect of different types of exercise intervention on the motor, cognitive and overall physical and mental functions in children and older adults. She may also assist in evaluating the status and needs for special needs populations.

Dr. Tseng was advised by Kinesiology professor Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.

Kane publishes invited chapter in Research in the Sociology of Sport series

cover of Reflections on Sociology of Sport volume showing person skiing down snow-covered slopeDr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, has published an invited chapter in the just-released Reflections on sociology of sport: Ten questions, ten scholars, ten perspectives (Kevin Young (Ed.); Bingley, UK: Emerald Press; ISBN 9781787146433).

In this tenth and celebratory volume in the Research in the Sociology of Sport series, ten recognized sport scholars from around the world (Toni Bruce, Cora Burnett, Jay Coakley, Agnes Elling, Steve Jackson, Mary Jo Kane, Joe Maguire, Roy McCree, Fabien Ohl, Gertrud Pfister) reflect on their respective academic journeys. They each address ten questions summarizing their career and their view of the current and future status of the sociology of sport.

Konczak gives lecture at Mini Medical School

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory in the School of Kinesiology, presented October 30 at the Academic Health Center’s Mini Medical School as part of their Fall 2017 series, “Medical Mysteries: Navigating Complex Health Cases.” His presentation with George S. Goding, Jr., M.D., professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, was titled “Finding a new treatment for the incurable voice disorder Spasmodic Dysphonia.” Konczak and Goding have been working with colleagues from Speech and Hearing Sciences and Engineering on a new treatment approach to improve the voice symptoms of patients with this voice disorder. Currently, there is no cure for the disease, though patients can get temporary relief through Botulinum toxin injections.

Comments from attendees after the presentation included:

This work gives me so much hope – what an interesting study!
Very interesting topic, more education on these topics is necessary so I am glad I was able to hear this presentation. Appreciated the presentation from both Dr’s because of the overlap!
Nicely simplified from complex information. Nice to hear U of M people are working together to make life better for those in need.
Loved the comment about calling around the U to find experts to help solve problems. There is so much happening at the U of M!!

Mini Medical School is a five-week program offered each semester that is designed to give individuals with a shared interest in health sciences the opportunity to examine the scientific foundations of health and disease presented by internationally renowned U of M experts who are shaping the way health care is delivered locally and globally.

Doctoral student Eydie Kramer presents at The Obesity Society meeting

Eydie Kramer, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology and advised by Dr. Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., is presenting at The Obesiety Society annual meeting on October 31, 2017 in Washington D.C.

Kramer will present a study on yoga intervention for African-American women that was conducted in the Behavioral Physical Activity Lab (BPAL) in 2016. Her poster titled “I Heart Yoga! A Pilot, Culturally-Tailored Yoga Intervention for African-American Women With Obesity” was selected as a top 10 abstract.

 

LaVoi to present at Wellesley College Oct. 25

image of Nicole M. LaVoiNicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center in the School of Kinesiology, will be guest speaking at Wellesley College on October 25 for the college’s LeadBLUE Athletic Leadership Academy. The title of her presentation is Building a Positive Team Culture.

Designed to facilitate leadership development tools and educational opportunities for all student-athletes, the LeadBLUE Athletic Leadership Academy aims to enhance the quality of team culture, student leadership, and the athletic experience at Wellesley.

LaVoi served as the head tennis coach at Wellesley from 1994-1998. See the complete announcement here.

 

BBC News quotes Kane on gender pay gap

Dr. Mary Jo KaneAs part of their “100 Women Challenge” series, the BBC News quotes  School of Kinesiology professor and Tucker Center co-director Mary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., in a recent online piece, “100 Women: Is the gender pay gap in sport really closing?

Ji spends productive sabbatical month at University of Valencia, Spain

Dr. Ji and Dr. Viña

Li Li Ji, Ph.D., professor and director of the LPHES in the School of Kinesiology, has finished a one-month visit to the University of Valencia, Spain, as part of his planned sabbatical activity. During his stay, he met with the University’s Faculty of Medicine led by Dr. Josè Viña, and with Dr. Carmen Gomez, a visiting scholar in LPHES last summer, to discuss continuing collaborations on research in the field of muscle biology and aging.

Ji gave two presentations to UV faculty, titled “Mechanism and prevention of muscle disuse atrophy via DNA transfection” and “Oat phytochemicals: Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.” The University of Valencia Medical College is a highly respected institution in Europe, and its former dean, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1906. Ji’s visiting professorship was sponsored by a grant from the European Union.