Category Archives: Topics

Vavrus gives talk at National Conference on Teacher Training in Tanzania

Dr. Frances VavrusFrances Vavrus, professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), participated in the National Conference on Teacher Training in Tanzania during the first week of April and gave a talk entitled The Local Picture: Contextual Considerations for Teacher Training in Tanzania. The conference was attended by representatives of the Tanzanian Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology, the World Bank, Save the Children, Peace Corps, and a number of Tanzanian universities and non-governmental organizations.  Dr. Vavrus has been involved in teacher professional development in Tanzania since 2006 as a facilitator and researcher studying the changing educational policy landscape in the country as it affects teachers’ lives.

Masten speaks at UN Psychology Day

Dr. Ann Masten
Dr. Ann Masten

Ann Masten,  Ph.D., Regents Professor and Irving B. Harris Professor of Child Development in the Institute of Child Development, spoke at the 10th Annual Psychology Day at the United Nations (UN) on April 20, 2017.

Psychology Day at the UN is an annual event that highlights how psychological science and practice contributes to the UN agenda. It’s attended by UN staff, ambassadors and diplomats, non-governmental organizations, members of the public and private sectors, and other stakeholders.

This year’s theme was “Promoting Well-being in the 21st Century: Psychological Contributions for Social, Economic, and Environmental Challenges.” The topic was chosen to align with the inclusion of well-being in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which was adopted in 2015 and outlines the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. In her remarks, Masten addressed the economic pillar by discussing her research on competence, risk, and resilience in development.

Kinesiology’s Nicolette Peterson and Anna Solfest present at 2017 UROP Symposium

Nicolette Peterson and Anna Solfest, both undergraduate students in the School of Kinesiology, participated in today’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) at the U of M.

Peterson, mentored in the UROP program by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor of movement science and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), presented her research, “The Effect of Feedback on Postural Sway and the Result of Possible Motion Sickness.” Solfest, mentored by Don Dengel, Ph.D., professor of exercise science and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), presented her research, “Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density of Division I Collegiate Male and Female Basketball Athletes.”

Nicolette Peterson
Anna Solfest

Kinesiology’s Dengel featured in CEHD Connect article on Dexalytics

Dr. Don Dengel

Together with CEHD’s Education Technology Innovation (EDI) team, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and his former advisee and partner Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., Research Scientist in Educational Technology Innovations in the College of Education and Human Development at the U of M, are featured in the current CEHD Connect magazine article, “What the body is.”

Dengel and Bosch have developed the Dexalytics tool to utilize massive amounts of DXA (dual-x-ray absorptiometry) body scan data to produce a single, “manageable score for each athlete, the Dexalytics Score, and connect body composition to performance.” With this information they are further able to help coaches and athletes develop individualized training plans.

Kinesiology’s Human Performance Teaching Lab hosts area high school students in Scrubs, Gloves, and Microscopes program

On April 11th, the School of Kinesiology’s Human Performance Teaching Laboratory (HPTL) hosted 24 high school students from around the metro area, who participated in the University of Minnesota’s Scrubs, Gloves & Microscopes program.

Under the direction of HPTL co-director Don Dengel, Ph.D., graduate students Christiana Raymond, Alex Kasak, Michelle Harbin, Bryce Murphy, Kate Uithoven, Neil Hultgren, Katie Bisch and undergraduate student, demonstrated laboratory exercises on Wingate testing, ultrasound imaging, body composition, pulmonary ventilation and electrocardiogram.

Gao serves as guest editor for special issue of Journal of Sport and Health Science

Zan Gao, Ph.D., Kinesiology associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, recently served as the Guest Editor for a special issue of Journal of Sport and Health Science titled “Promoting Physical Activity and Health through Exergaming.”

The purpose of this special topic is to investigate the effects of exergaming on individuals’ energy expenditure, physical activity participation, sedentary behaviors, actual and perceived motor skills, activity choices, behavioral changes and psychosocial beliefs through experimental and quasi-experimental designs. The special issue includes a total of four original articles, one review article, one editorial, and one commentary piece contributed by research scientists in the USA, Australia, France, and Belgium. The special issue is available at this link.

Neil Hultgren, Kin M.S., wins second place in Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition

Neil Hultgren, Kinesiology M.S. student advised by Donald Dengel, Ph.D., director of  the  Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, took second place in the Pre-Doctor Division Abstract and Poster Presentation competition at the University of Minnesota’s 31st Annual Pediatric Research, Education and Scholarship Symposium (PRESS) on April 14, 2017. Neil’s poster presentation was titled: “Central Blood Pressure Regulation in Relation to Hypertension and Adiposity in Youth.” The research is part of Neil’s master’s thesis.

LaVoi quoted in Harvard Crimson

Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., is quoted in a Harvard Crimson article, “In Harvard’s Athletics Department, A Stark Wage Gap.” The article critically reviews Harvard athletic coach salaries.

Ed Psych researchers present on misinformation surrounding ASD

Despite the facts, people across the world hold different beliefs about what causes autism spectrum disorder (ASD). On March 31, faculty and researchers from the Department of Educational Psychology shared findings from a recent “glocal” (locally based with global components) study on the misinformation that surrounds ASD.

Panayiota Kendeou, Guy Bond Chair in Reading and associate professor in the psychological foundations of education program, kicked off the event with an introduction into the cognitive theory behind “Reducing the Impact of Misinformation around ASD.” She explained the misinformation effect and her Knowledge Revision Components Framework (KrEC) which examines the incremental steps of knowledge revision.Watch Kendeou’s presentation.

Gregory Trevors, post-doctoral fellow in the psychological foundations of education program, provided additional background, presenting local and global data from the study on “The Public’s Prior Knowledge about the Causes of ASD and its Relations to Treatment Recommendation.” Watch Trevor’s presentation.

Veronica Fleury, assistant professor and ASD licensure & M.Ed. coordinator in the special education program, presented findings from the local portion of the study conducted at the Minnesota State fair, specifically examining “The Impact of (source) Credibility on Treatment Recommendations.” Watch Fleury’s presentation.

Finally, Krista Muis, associate professor in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology at McGill University, provided an outside perspective on why the Global Signature Program is important. Muis, who studies how individuals process complex, contradictory content on socio-scientific issues such as vaccinations, noted the strengths of the research project. She also posed a few questions about the local portion of study and provided recommendations for future global research on the topic. Watch Muis’ presentation.

The event ended with a discussion that will help inform the content for future coursework, including a study abroad course focused on understanding ASD with an emphasis on debunking global misinformation.

The signature program is funded by the Office of International Initiatives and Relations at the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD).

  1. Kendeou, P., & O’Brien, E. J. (2014). The Knowledge Revision Components (KReC) Framework: Processes and Mechanisms. In D. Rapp, & J. Braasch (Eds.), Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences Cambridge: MIT.

Lewis presents two research projects at San Diego conference

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, presented twice at the 38th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Diego, CA., in March 2017.

The research projects Dr. Lewis presented are “Feasibility and efficacy of a physical activity intervention for the prevention of postpartum depression: A randomized trial.” (Lewis, B. A., Schuver, K., Gjerdingen, D., Terrell, C., & Avery, M. ) and “The future of physical activity intervention research: Expanding focus to sedentary behavior, technology, and dissemination.” (Lewis, B.A., Napolitano, M.A., Buman, M., Williams, D.M., Nigg, C.R.).

Kendeou presents at Northwestern University on debunking misinformation

Panayiota Kendeou

Panayiota (Pani) Kendeou, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Guy Bond Chair in Reading, recently presented to the Multi-disciplinary Program in Learning Sciences at Northwestern University on the “Science of Debunking Misinformation.”

In the talk, Kendeou discussed a series of studies that examine the incremental steps of knowledge revision, detailing its time course and mechanisms during reading comprehension in the context of the Knowledge Revision Components framework (KReC).1 She explained how KReC—which she developed with Professor Edward J O’Brien at the University of New Hampshire—aligns itself nicely with knowledge revision in the context of reading comprehension and has implications for research in text comprehension, conceptual change, persuasion, and the misinformation effect.

Get more information on Kendeou’s research by visiting her Reading & Language Lab.

  1. Kendeou, P., & O’Brien, E. J. (2014). The Knowledge Revision Components (KReC) Framework: Processes and Mechanisms. In D. Rapp, & J. Braasch (Eds.), Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences Cambridge: MIT.

Billington collaborates on NSF-funded grant to create interactive science education games

Barbara Billington, a science lecturer in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, will collaborate with University of Minnesota colleagues and educational technology company Andamio Games on a project funded by the National Science Foundation to produce a series of tablet-based lessons and challenges to help high school students master concepts related to photosynthesis and cell respiration. This project will enable students to learn difficult science concepts using a collaborative gaming approach that aims to significantly increase student engagement and understanding.

As part of the grant, Billington will partner with life science teachers from Saint Paul Public Schools to conduct a classroom study in the second year of the project. Lessons will be designed and research directed by both Billington and her colleagues Sehoya Cotner, associate professor in the College of Biological Sciences, and Christopher Desjardins, research associate at the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement.

“Science teacher feedback in Phase I of the project reconfirmed the value of our multi-player approach and also led us to the addition of a virtual biology lab,” said Andamio Games president Adam Gordon. “Teachers wanted their students to get a practical experience of scientific experimentation — including when it doesn’t go quite as expected — independent of the usual costs and time commitments for conventional lab experiments.”

Billington has a unique understanding of science classrooms after seven years teaching high school biology. She earned both her teacher licensure and Ph.D. in science education from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, where her current research focuses on training pre-service teachers and gender equity in STEM education.

Find out more about the science education programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

 

LaVoi and colleagues publish chapter in Sex Integration in Sport and Physical Culture

Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., and colleagues Janet S. Fink (U Mass Amherst) and Kristine E. Newhall (Smith College) have published a chapter entitled “Challenging the Gender Binary? Male Basketball Practice Players’ Views of Female Athletes and Women’s Sports” in the edited book, Sex Integration in Sport and Physical Culture: Promises and Pitfalls, (Alex Channon, Katherine Dashper, Thomas Fletcher, and Robert J. Lake, editors) from Routledge.

 

 

Stoffregen discusses motion sickness research in To See the Sea

An online publication for the cruising set, To See the Sea, features an interview with Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and researcher on motion sickness. Stoffregen discusses his fascination as a boy in the 1960s with astronauts and space travel, including the phenomenon of motion sickness (which afflicts many astronauts in space), and how it led him to the research he is doing today.

The podcast and written transcript are available at tps://toseethesea.com/index.php/interviews/.

Wade discusses children’s development of motor skills on MomEnough weekly show

Michael Wade, Ph.D., Kinesiology professor, is the featured speaker on the April 10 MomEnough show.

The topic of Wade’s online discussion is, “Understanding and Encouraging Your Child’s Development of Motor Skills: A Conversation with Dr. Michael Wade.

MomEnough is an online resource that offers weekly shows featuring experts across a wide spectrum of parenting topics. It is co-hosted by mother-daughter team Marti Erickson, Ph.D., retired CEHD faculty member, and Erin Erickson, D.N.P., M.P.H., R.N.

 

Stoffregen interviewed by online publication PsyPost

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perceptual-Action Laboratory, was interviewed by the online publication PsyPost on his research relating to the virtual reality headset Oculus Rift. His study, conducted with Kinesiology Ph.D. student Justin Munafo and U of M undergraduate honors student Meg Diedrick, indicates that using the headset can cause motion sickness, and that women are more likely to experience this effect than men.  Stoffregen says, “As interactive devices increasingly pervade the lives of ordinary people, motion sickness related to these technologies becomes more and more common. The problem is getting worse, not better.” 

The article is available here.

 

Prof. Yuhei Inoue featured in The Japan Times

image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an article written for The Japan Times, Japan’s largest English language newspaper. The article, “Japanese collegiate sports study ends Phase 1,” recaps a symposium Inoue participated as a presenter and panel member. The symposium’s theme was the reform of Japanese college sports systems and took place on March 29 in Tokyo.
In the article, Inoue discusses his thoughts on changing the financial structures of college’s sports programs, explaining that by doing so, it would make sports teams more attractive properties for their respective institutions to invest in.

Konczak gives keynote at Center for Clinical and Translational Science at U of Kentucky

School of Kinesiology professor Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.,  gave a keynote address last Thursday, March 30, at the 12th Annual Spring Conference of the Center for Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Kentucky. The conference had approximately 900 attendees, mostly from the medical and engineering sciences, as well as practitioners from across the state. Konczak spoke on robotic rehabilitation and their impact for future neurorehabilitation therapies and diagnostics.

HSCL members share hands-on science with students and families at Hmong International Academy

Jessica Holst-Wolf and Arash Mahnan

Members of the Human Sensorimotor Control Lab (HSCL) in the School of Kinesiology attended the Hmong International Academy for a community outreach event last Thursday evening, March 30. The Academy, a culturally specific school for children Pre-K through Grade 8, asked several departments at the U of M to attend Family Fun Night to share information about their work and research for families and their children who attend the school.

Kinesiology doctoral students Jessica Holst-Wolf, Arash Mahnan and I-Ling Yeh set up three mini-stations demonstrating EMG (electromyography) technology, postural control, and how to measure haptic sensitivity, or sense of touch, and provided general information about kinesiology and movement science. HSCL lab director is Kinesiology professor Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.

C&I graduate student, Kay Rosheim, wins Robert Schreiner Reading Dissertation Fellowship

Kay Rosheim, a Ph.D. candidate in Literacy Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, received the 2016-17 Robert Schreiner Reading Dissertation Fellowship. The $2,500 fellowship is designed to support the candidate’s dissertation research in reading education.   Awardees are selected based of the importance of the research, the clarity with which it is described, the potential the work has for making a significant contribution to the field, and the probability that the research will be completed in a timely manner.

Rosheim is pursuing her Ph.D. while working as a K-6 Literacy Specialist at Forest Hills Elementary in Eden Prairie, uniquely positioning her dissertation research.  Rosheim’s dissertation explores the continuum of quiet in the K-6 classroom, recognizing that the role of silence is a complex process. Through an inquiry of designing and implementing curriculum and pedagogies for an extremely quiet student, Kay aims to acquire new knowledge and practices of instruction that promotes self-efficacy in quiet learners.

Rosheim’s advisor is Associate Professor, Lori Helman.

Learn more about the Ph.D. in Literacy Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.