Category Archives: Topics

Kihl and colleague to publish in Business & Society Review

KihllL-prefAssociate professor Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., professor of Sport Management in the School of Kinesiology, and her colleague, Dr. Kathy Babiak (University of Michigan) have had their paper titled, “A blueprint for CSR engagement: Identifying stakeholder expectations and attitudes of a community relations program,” accepted for publication in Business & Society Review. The paper examines sport stakeholders’ expectations regarding corporations’ CSR initiatives through dialogue. Kihl and Babiak argue that stakeholder dialogue is an important way for a business to gain perceptions about how it is viewed and evaluated by its stakeholders and underlies subsequent interactions.

M.S.W. Graduate Named 2017 Bush Fellow

Brenda Hartman (M.S.W. ’89), a St. Paul therapist who provides counseling to adolescents, adults, and couples, was named a 2017 Bush Fellow this week.

She and 23 other people were selected from nearly 650 applications for the fellowships. Applicants described their leadership vision and how a Bush Fellowship would both help them achieve their goals and make their community better. Each Fellow will receive up to $100,000 to pursue the education and experiences they believe will help them become more effective leaders.

With her Bush Fellowship, Hartman will study end-of-life practices from different cultures, religions, and spiritual traditions, and grow her leadership skills through coursework and consultation.

She has lived nearly three decades longer than expected after receiving a stage 4 cancer diagnosis. Over those years, she has devoted herself to addressing the social, emotional, and spiritual aspects of the cancer experience. She sees a strong need to promote a cultural shift in society’s response to death. She wants to introduce a narrative that counters fear and denial with a view of death as a healing process. She seeks new ways to incorporate end-of-life planning into training for healthcare professionals.

More information about Hartman and her therapy practice. (link this line to http://www.healingthroughlife.com/index.php

More information on the Bush Fellowship.  (link to https://www.bushfoundation.org/fellowships/bush-fellowship)

 

Stoffregen featured in latest Science News cover story

The cover story of the March 18 issue of Science News includes the latest research being conducted by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL). Stoffregen is quoted extensively on his work related to virtual reality, motion sickness, and the sex connection.

 

LaVoi to serve on panel at event at Villanova University

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and Tucker Center co-director in the School of Kinesiology, will be at Villanova University on March 24, 2017, to serve as a panelist for the event,“The Grace of Playing: A Conversation on Sports and Their Role in Human Flourishing.”

Kane to moderate session at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study conference

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Tucker Center for Research in Girls & Women in Sport, will be moderating the session, “Gender, Media, and Popular Culture,” at the conference “Game Changers: Sports, Gender, and Society” to be held April 6-7 at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Award-winning book on sport management theory features chapters by Inoue, Kane, and Kihl

Three School of Kinesiology faculty contributed chapters to an award-winning book on sport management theory.

Routledge Handbook of Theory in Sport Management was selected as an Outstanding Academic Title 2016 by CHOICE magazine, published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., and Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., each wrote chapters. This is the first book to trace the intellectual contours of theory in sport management, and to explain, critique and celebrate the importance of sport management theory in academic research, teaching and learning, and in the development of professional practice.

Inoue and Kihl contributed to the Managerial Theories section with their chapters, “Developing a Theory of Suffering and Academic Corruption in Sport” (Kihl) and “Applying Strategic CSR in Sport” (Inoue). Kane contributed the chapter “The Continuum Theory: Challenging Traditional Conceptualization and Practices of Sport” in the section Sociocultural Theories. Dr. Kane is director of the School of Kinesiology’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, and Dr. Kihl is an affiliated scholar in the Tucker Center.

CEHD experts quoted in MinnPost on use of student data

Theodore J. Christ, professor (Educational Psychology) and director of the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement; Michael Rodriguez, professor (Educational Psychology) and Campbell Leadership Chair in Education and Human Development; and Mistilina Sato, associate professor (Curriculum & Instruction) and Campbell Chair for Innovation in Teacher Development were recently featured in the MinnPost article, “Minnesota is really good at collecting student data, but not the best at using it.”

The article discusses a recent report released by the Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor which found “significant time and resources” were used to administer the tests but more than half of the principals and teachers surveyed said they felt “unprepared to interpret key test score data.”

“I mean, they’re just drowning in [data],” Christ told MinnPost. “It’s all over the place. And if they don’t have the capacity to use it, they just turn away from it.”

“Schools that get useful information from those MCAs are the ones that do the deeper dives,” Rodriguez explained in the article. “They look at the variability. They look at the group differences. They look at: How are students with these kinds of experiences doing versus students who don’t have those experiences, and which kinds of experiences are we giving a kid that helps them perform better? And that requires someone who can go in and breakdown those numbers and do some analysis. Not many schools have staff that can do that.”

“Every school seems to have its own assessment culture,” Sato explained to MinnPost. “Once you enter into the school, you have to first learn about how that school is using [data].”

The article mentions a class Rodriguez and Sato are developing for all students in Curriculum & Instruction’s teacher prep program. The course will help teacher candidates interpret the data available to them to better educate their students.

MinnPost ends the piece with an important question from Christ.

“We need to make a decision: Are we going to be a state who simply has decided data is not important? And then let’s stop collecting it, because we’re spending tens of millions of dollars collecting it, but we don’t know how to use it,” Christ told MinnPost. “Or are we going to be a state who values data and research? And [then] we’re both going to collect that data and support the use of it.”

Read the full article.

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Kim will publish in Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport

Young Ho Kim, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has had a paper accepted for publication in the Korean Journal of Sociology of Sport. The paper, entitled “The Normalization of Sport Corruption and Interdependence of the Factors: Symbiosis of Threefolding’s Organism,” examines 1) how sport corruption is normalized in certain sport organizations and societies, and 2) how sport corruption, through the process of normalization, is produced and reproduced in their organic system. Young is advised by Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., and Rayla Allison, JD.

Williams Ridge receives director’s award

Headshot of Sheila Williams Ridge
Sheila Williams Ridge

Sheila Williams Ridge, M.A., director of the Shirley G. Moore Lab School in the Institute of Child Development, received the 2016 Director’s Award from the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE).

NAAEE is a membership organization that aims to accelerate environmental literacy and civic engagement through education. The Director’s Award recognizes an individual or organization that has made a significant contribution to the field of environmental education.

Williams Ridge was recognized for her work chairing the 2016 Nature-based Preschool Conference, the annual conference of NAAEE’s early childhood environmental education initiative, the Natural Start Alliance.

In addition, Williams-Ridge is on the advisory team for the Natural Start Alliance and the National Science Foundation-funded Science of Nature-Based Learning Collaborative Research Network. She also serves on the leadership team for the Council of Nature and Forest Preschools.

HSCL colleagues’ article listed as one of most influential papers of 2016 by Veterinary Clinics: Equine Practice

Labs-HSCThe journal Veterinary Clinics: Equine Practice has published a summary of the most influential papers in equine medicine for 2016. One of these is by Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL) colleagues in collaboration with a group of equine veterinarians from the University of Minnesota/Michigan State University. The paper is entitled “The Equine Movement Disorder “Shivers” Is Associated with Selective Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Axonal Degeneration.”

Valberg SJ, Lewis SS, Shivers JL, Barnes NE, Konczak J, Draper AC, Armién AG. Vet Pathol. 2015 Nov;52(6):1087-98. doi: 10.1177/0300985815571668

Stoffregen quoted in ScienceNews

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was interviewed about his research related to motion sickness and virtual reality for the March 18 edition of ScienceNews. A number of researchers believe that sensory mismatch is to blame for the motion sickness that can be present with virtual reality use, but Stoffregen believes that instability is the culprit. The full article can be accessed here.

Stoffregen also is lab director for the School’s Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory.

Carlson awarded Distinguished McKnight University Professorship

Dr. Stephanie Carlson

Stephanie M. Carlson, Ph.D., professor and director of research in the Institute of Child Development, has been awarded the Distinguished McKnight University Professorship, which honors the University of Minnesota’s highest-achieving mid-career faculty. Carlson is an internationally recognized leader in the study of executive function.

As a Distinguished McKnight University Professor, Carlson will receive a $100,000 grant for research and scholarly activities, and carry the title throughout her University career. Carlson is one of six University professors receiving the award in 2017. Three CEHD professors have earned the award previously, including Frank Symons of educational psychology, and Megan Gunnar and Ann Masten, both in the Institute of Child Development.

Through her research, Carlson has developed innovative ways of measuring executive function – or the set of skills that helps individuals pay attention, control impulses and think flexibly – in very young children. She has also made discoveries about the role of executive function in other aspects of human development, including decision-making and creativity.

Her accomplishments include co-developing the Minnesota Executive Function Scale (MEFS), a testing app that measures executive function and early learning readiness in children. The MEFS is the only early learning readiness assessment measuring executive function that can be used with children as young as two years old. To help put the tool in the hands of early educators, she co-founded the tech start-up Reflection Sciences and now serves as its CEO.

“Stephanie Carlson not only has conducted ground-breaking research that has advanced the field of cognitive development, but she also has developed practical tools for early educators,” said CEHD Dean Jean Quam. “She is an engaged professor, researcher and mentor to her students, and an outstanding asset to the college.”

Carlson and the other winners of this year’s Distinguished McKnight University Professorships will be recognized at the May Board of Regents meeting and honored at a celebratory dinner.

LIHP recent graduate and lab members publish in Journal of Clinical Ultrasound

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a recent graduate from the School of Kinesiology (2016) is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound. The is article entitled “High-flow-mediated constriction in adults is not influenced by biomarkers of cardiovascular and metabolic risk.” The results of this study demonstrated that increased body mass, fat mass, and body mass index were associated with a greater high-flow mediated constriction.

Dr. Ostrem’s former adviser, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, co-authored this article together with Nik Brinck, a recent undergraduate (2015), Katie Bisch, a master student, and Nick Evanoff, a doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology.

Natalie Low awarded Anne D. Pick Award for an Outstanding Child Psychology Major

Natalie Low receiving Anne D. Pick Award for an Outstanding Child Psychology Major

Every year, the Institute of Child Development (ICD) awards one undergraduate child psychology student with the Anne D. Pick Award for an Outstanding Child Psychology Major. The recipient demonstrates excellence in research and academics in the area of child development.

This year’s recipient is Natalie Low, who studies emotion regulation (ER) at ICD. Low currently conducts research in the Cognitive Development and Neuroimaging (CDN) Lab with ICD Professor Kathleen Thomas, Ph.D.,  on how children learn different strategies from the environment to help them regulate their emotions.

Along with an inscribed plaque, Low will receive a scholarship of $500 and up to $250 in travel/ research funds. Below, Low discusses how she developed an interest in child psychology and her post-graduation plans.

What made you want to study child psychology? 

I came across the child psychology major by chance. While applying to transfer to the University of Minnesota, I was unsure of what I wanted to major in and as I was filling out my application, I chanced upon the major. I knew that I wanted to continue pursuing something related to the field of psychology or the social sciences and that I wanted to work with children. Looking back, this decision has been one filled with great reward and tremendous challenge, but it is something that I don’t regret.

What kind of research are you involved in? 

As an undergraduate research assistant in the CDN Lab, I investigated the role of early experience in brain development. As part of an independent study, I have developed a coding scheme, with the assistance of Dr. Thomas, to examine attentional strategies used by preschool children to regulate their emotions. I also have worked with ICD Associate Professor Melissa Koenig, Ph.D., in the Early Language and Experience Lab (ELEL), where I examined how preschool children reason about the intentions and actions of people. Currently, I am assisting Dr. Thomas in a separate study examining social and emotional development in children who have had a hemipherectomy (half of their brain removed).

What do you find most interesting about child development? 

You can never have two children who are exactly alike. Child development is continuously affected by biological factors, environmental factors, and even an amalgamation and interaction of both. I find it interesting how even under similar conditions, two children will be different from one another, especially in the research area I am interested in, emotional development, whereby children may use similar strategies for regulation.

What are your plans after graduation? 

My coursework, clinical experience and research experiences have inspired me to attend graduate school in developmental psychology. I have received numerous opportunities to study cognitive development in children, but still continue to find it intriguing, especially in its relation to emotional development. Ultimately, I hope to attend graduate school to attain the skills necessary for a career as a qualified and inquisitive developmental researcher and to continue to contribute and create greater awareness and understanding of child development.

Sera contributes to national report on promoting educational success of English learners

Headshot of Professor Maria Sera
Maria D. Sera, Ph.D.

Maria D. Sera, Ph.D., professor and director of undergraduate studies in the Institute of Child Development, contributed to a recent National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report on promoting the educational success of children and youth who are learning English.

Sera served on a National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committee that examined how research on the development of English learners could inform policy and improve educational outcomes. Sera’s research focuses on the relation between language and cognitive development and on the learning of second languages by children and adults.

The committee’s report, which was released on Feb. 28, highlighted key research, identified effective practices for educators, and made recommendations for how policymakers can support children and youth who are learning English. It looked at two groups of children and youth: dual language learners, or children ages birth to 5 who are learning two languages and are not enrolled in school, and English learners, who are enrolled in the pre-K-12 education system and are learning English as a second language. Most English learners are born in the U.S. and are U.S. citizens.

The report found that English learners, who account for more than 9 percent of K-12 enrollment in the U.S., face barriers to academic success, as schools often do not provide adequate instruction or resources to support acquiring English proficiency. According to the report, early care and education providers, teachers, and administrators do not receive appropriate training to foster desired educational outcomes for children and youth learning English.

The report also discussed capacities and influences on language development, including that children have the capacity to learn two languages from birth if they are given adequate input in each. It noted that speaking to children in a different language at home will not hurt a child’s ability to learn English and that having strong skills in a home language can help children learn a second language.

Overall, the report made 10 recommendations to government agencies at all levels to improve educational outcomes. For example, the report recommended that agencies that oversee early care and education programs provide specific evidence-based program guidance for serving dual language learners and their families. The report also recommended that agencies conduct marketing campaigns to provide information about the capacity of children to learn more than one language.

The study was sponsored by the U.S. departments of Education and Health and Human Services, the Foundation for Child Development, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the McKnight Foundation.

Pope awarded $1200 COGS Travel Grant to present at SHAPE America’s national convention 

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology, has been awarded a $1200 Council of Graduate Students (COGS) Travel Grant to present two posters and give one oral presentation at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention held in Boston March 14-18. Pope is advised by Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory.

COGS is a University-wide student organization that represents, advocates for, and supports graduate students at the U of M. The travel grant supports students who present original work at a conference with a poster, oral presentation, or other acceptable format.  The maximum award is $1200.

While at the SHAPE America Convention, Pope will also be awarded a 2017 Research Council Graduate Student Research Award by SHAPE America for his project, “Validity of Smartwatches in Assessing Energy Expenditure and Heart Rate.”

Tucker Center research referenced at Women in Sports panel in Chicago

Tucker Center  research on media coverage for women’s sports was cited in an article appearing on The DePaulia online site, “Jean Lenti Posetto and Doug Bruno talk DePaul and women’s sports at symposium.” The symposium, held in Chicago, featured a panel of Chicago-based sports professionals who agreed that they were “tired of continuously fighting for equal female rights within the world of sports.”

The symposium was jointly sponsored by Chicago Sports Net and DePaul University, and gave attendees a first look at their upcoming six-part documentary, “Tomboy,” that takes a deeper look into the involvement of women in sports. The article cites the Tucker Center’s statistic that only four percent of all sports coverage includes women’s sports.

PAEL researchers will present next week at SHAPE America National Convention

Researchers from the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL) in the School of Kinesiology will give six presentations and be included as coauthors on two other presentations at the Society for Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) America National Convention in Boston, MA, from March 14th to 18th. PAEL Director Zan Gao, Ph.D., and Ph.D. candidates June Lee and Zachary Pope, Ph.D. student Nan Zeng, and undergraduate student Kalli Fautsch will be presenting. Their presentations are listed below.

Gao, Z., Leininger, B., Schulz, C., Bronfort, G., Evans, R., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., & Haas, M. (2017, March). Relationships between physical activity and low back pain in adolescents
Fautsch, K., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Exercise modalities on physical activity and behavior in ASD children.
Lee, J., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Effect of home-based Exergaming on preschool children’s cognitive function and cardiorespiratory fitness.
Li, X., Peng, Q., Tan, J., Yang, H., He, W., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Relationships among Chinese college children’s motives and physical activity behavior.
Peng, Q., Li, X., Tan, J., Yang, H., He, W., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Associations among college students’ physical activity, sedentary time and health.
Pope, Z., & Gao, Z., (2017, March). Effectiveness of smartphone-based physical activity intervention on college student health: Randomized-controlled trial.
Pope, Z., Lee, J., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Validity of smartwatches in assessing energy expenditure and heart rate.
Zeng, N., Lee, J., Pope, Z., & Gao, Z. (2017, March). Comparison of physiological and psychological outcomes between normal weight and overweight/obese college students during exergaming.

Russell, White, and Wiese-Bjornstal publish study in Sage Publications

School of Kinesiology alumna Hayley Russell, Ph.D. (2014), is the lead author on an article just released by Sage Publications. Co-authors are Andrew White, Kinesiology Ph.D. student, and their adviser, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., Kinesiology professor. Dr. Russell is currently a faculty member at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN.

The complete citation is: Russell, H. C., White, A. C., & Wiese-Bjornstal, D. M. (2017). Physical and psychological changes during marathon training and running injuries: An interdisciplinary, repeated-measures approach. SAGE research methods cases. London, UK: Sage Publications.

Abdi’s research finds critical link between public school and immigrant student experience

“Public schools are the de facto experience for immigrant children to be part of this country, both to learn about and participate in the nation,” says Nimo Abdi, a faculty member in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, noting that public schools are the first place where immigrant children contact mainstream culture and learn ways to integrate.

Abdi’s research focuses on the intersectionality, or interconnected nature of social categorizations such as race, class, and gender, as they apply to the immigrant student. She is interested in how context shapes the identities of students. And what she has found is that the impact of schooling cannot but understated for students that are new to this country.

Preconceptions Hurt Immigrant Students

Abdi is studying the Somali community in Columbus, Ohio which is very similar to the one here in the Twin Cities. She sees Somali students face the obstacle of preconceived notions based on their background in the Columbus public schools. “Teachers and school administrators and students have certain concepts of what it means to be a Somali,” Abdi says.

As a science teacher in Columbus, Abdi noticed that students were treated differently based on their appearance. Russian immigrant students were mainstreamed into regular classes even if they needed the help of an ESL class. However, second-generation Somali students were still being placed in ESL classes even if they were proficient.

“Those things tend to mark and label students in a certain way—being visible, being black and Muslim, and also being Somali,” Abdi finds in her experience and research.

Caught Between Two Cultures

Somalis students deal with the dual pressure of having to fit into their schools and into their home communities by changing their identities in different contexts. “In urban settings, some Somali students appropriate hip-hop culture to be part of the black youth culture,” says Abdi, noting that they are not necessarily accepted completely not do they see themselves as such.

“One boy told me that sometimes he identified as Somali, sometimes as African-American. It all depends on the context. “

Trying to fit into the school and home community is especially difficult for girls. “Girls come to school completely covered, and in literally less than ten minutes they take everything off and look completely different,” Abdi says that “the tricky thing about the whole notion of dress code is it could have completely different meanings in different settings. Covering is appreciated in the Somali context as a show of modesty but it has the opposite effect in mainstream culture. It’s a very difficult for young children to navigate that.”

Creating Spaces for Immigrant Students

In order to help immigrant students thrive in the educational system, Abdi believes that schools need to create spaces for all children, by educating students about different religions and offering options for students who don’t conform to the majority religion. She believes that a culturally responsive pedagogy could go a long way towards helping to integrate immigrant children and their communities.

“Social categories have real-life consequences in people’s lives. Being labelled in a certain way, has real meaning for children and how they see themselves,” Abdi reveals the main finding of her research: “The context of our education shapes who we are and how we see the world.”

Find about more about teacher education programs designed to support immigrant students in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.