Introduction to Prevention Science to be offered online

An introduction to prevention science will be offered online summer session 2018.

The Department of Family Social Science will offer an introduction to Prevention Science course online during the 2018 summer session, May 21-August 17.

The course, “Prevention Science: Principles and Practices,” (FSoS 5701, class number 88756) is open to graduate-level students. Undergraduate and nontraditional students may take the course with the instructor’s permission. Registration opens March 1 and ends May 25, the Friday following the first day of class.

This course is an excellent introduction to prevention science concepts and methods and will cover foundations for strategic interventions to prevent behavioral problems and promote healthy development, as well as trends and best practices in the discipline.

Prevention Science is a multi-disciplinary comprehensive approach to identify how best to promote the well-being of diverse families and communities by bridging research and practice. Learn more about Prevention Science.

Current prevention science research being conducted at the U of M includes preventing antisocial behavior and drug abuse, developing evidence-based parenting programs and education, supporting healthy development in at-risk populations, and exploring the value of mentor-based interventions.

For more information

Contact Instructor Kristen Johnson or visit OneStop.

Dengel and colleagues publish in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and colleagues have published in the online publication, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

The article, “Association between carotid intimates media thickness, age, and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents,” describes their study to determine the relations of measures of carotid intima media thickness with body mass index and cardiovascular risk score in children. The study concluded that maintaining normal levels of adiposity and other risk variables may be useful in preventing early changes associated with preclinical atherosclerosis.

 

Stoffregen publishes in newest Kinesiology Review issue

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory,  published in a recent issues of Kinesiology Review. In his article titled “Ecological Physics and the Perceptual Information That Supports Motor Control,” he discusses the nature of perceptual information and implications for kinesiology.

Kinesiology Review is the official publication of the National Academy of Kinesiology (NAK) and the American Kinesiology Association (AKA).

 

Ozy.com profile of US Hockey’s Hilary Knight quotes Tucker Center’s Kane

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an Ozy.com profile of US Olympic Hockey star Hilary Knight, “Team USA’s Hockey Star Has A Higher Goal: Equal Pay.” Kane says “the team’s ability to convert frustration into actionable progress has major historical significance.”

Kane podcast on WiSP Sports: “Limited sport coverage for female athletes”

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is featured in a WiSP Sports “Talking Point” podcast discussing how sport can be a site of resistance and empowerment for women. The podcast and transcript, “How Women’s Status in Sport is Contained by Men,” is a discussion of Kane’s “perspectives on why women’s sports coverage is so limited and why the focus on women’s athletes tends towards sexual objectification instead of their physical and athletic capacities.” WiSP Sports Radio is the world’s largest podcast network for women’s sport featuring more than 760 episodes and 30 unique shows with a global reach of 1.6 million.

 

credit – A WiSP Sports Production

Wiese-Bjornstal quoted in corporate publication 3M Particles

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, is quoted in the article, “Don’t let your injury get the best of you: The role of mental fitness in rehabilitation,” by Janna Fischer. It appears in the online corporate publication, 3M Particles, which features stories about science applied to life. The article discusses the mental challenges of returning from sport- and exercise-related injuries.

Dengel presents at University of Utah

Dr. Don DengelDonald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Utah in the Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation on February 5. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “Measuring Vascular Function: From Peripheral to Cerebral.”

Barr-Anderson presents at Minne-College in Arizona

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented at Minne-College in Arizona held in Scottsdale, AZ, on February 10. The title of her presentation was “Move More to Weigh Less: The Importance of Physical Activity to Address Childhood Obesity.” Also attending were CEHD Dean Jean Quam, Serena Wright, CEHD Sr. Alumni Director, and a number of U of M alumni. Minne-College in Arizona is sponsored by the U of M Alumni Association.

KARE-11 features Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report in story on National Girls and Women in Sports Day

KARE 11 TV gave a nod to the Tucker Center’s  2017- 18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences in their story related to the National Girls and Women in Sports Day celebration on February 7. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, was interviewed for the story and said the report “hopefully stimulates dialogue, raises awareness, helps to recruit and retain more women in the coaching profession, and holds decision-makers who hire coaches more accountable.”

Dengel shares insight on impact of Olympic Games

With the XXIII Olympic Winter Games opening in Pyeongchang County, South Korea on February 8, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is quoted on the U of M homepage on the long-term impact the Olympic Games can have on host countries. Read the feature here.

During winter break, Dengel led a course in London, England, about the impact of the 1908, 1948 and 2012 Olympics on the city, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and on sport. He also taught Sport and Politics Collide: 1936 & 1972 German Olympics.

Weiss receives Legacy Award by Girls on the Run International

From the left: Liz Kunz (CEO of GOTRI), Maureen R. Weiss, Allie Riley (Senior VP of Evaluation and Programming)

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was recognized with the Legacy Award, the highest honor given by Girls on the Run International at its annual Summit in Austin, TX, in January. Girls on the Run is a 501(c)(3) organization and physical activity-based positive youth development (PA-PYD) program designed to enhance girls’ social, psychological, and physical skills and behaviors to successfully navigate life experiences. The program uses running and other physical activities as a platform for teaching life skills and promoting holistic health outcomes for girls in grades 3-8. The organization’s reach is national—in all 50 states with over 200 local community councils, 50,000 volunteer coaches, and over 1.5 million girls served since inception. The organization is committed to diversity—serving girls from all walks of life and backgrounds. Nearly 50% of girls receive subsidized registration fees to enable them to attain the psychosocial and behavioral benefits of participating in each season’s 10-week program.

Weiss’ Legacy Award was based on eight years and hundreds of hours devoted to serving this non-profit organization—as a board member, consultant, speaker, and contributor to curricular development and effective coach delivery—as well as conducting an independent longitudinal evaluation study that demonstrated strong and lasting positive impact of program participation on girls’ life skills learning and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes—confidence, competence, connection, caring, character, and contribution to community and society. The study received widespread attention in a press release last August and Weiss presented the study results at the Summit meeting in a presentation titled, “How and Why Girls on the Run is an Exemplary Positive Youth Development Program.”

 

Tucker Center releases 2017-18 NCAA Division-I Women Coaches Report

The Tucker Center, in collaboration with the Alliance of Women Coaches, is proud to announce the release of the 2017-18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences report and infographic. 40+ years after the passage of Title IX, female sport participation is at an all-time high but the percentage of women coaching women at the collegiate level is stagnant. While the number of collegiate coaching opportunities is also at a record high, only 20% of all college coaching positions for men’s and women’s teams are filled by women. One goal of this report is to change that trend. View the report and infographic here…

MN teacher candidate grant winner, Haley Tostenson, on the challenges and rewards of training to be a teacher

Haley Tostenson is earning her M.Ed. and initial teaching license in elementary education and recently received the MN Teacher Candidate Grant to help her pursue her teaching license. She talks with us openly about the challenges she will face as a teacher, and why it’s all worth it.

Congratulations on winning the teacher candidate grant award. Did the college provide any support to help you apply for the award?

CEHD reached out to me about the teacher candidate grant award. The process was really simple and I had timely responses from the faculty members that I reached out to about it.

 

What drew you to enrolling in the M.Ed. and Initial Teaching License program (ILP) in elementary education?

I decided to apply for the ILP program after an incredible four years in the undergrad program here at the U of M. I was challenged to think about elementary education in a whole new light, where diverse cultures are infused with current research to reach every child’s needs.

 

What do you think will be the biggest challenge of being a teacher?

I think there are a lot of challenges that come with being an educator, but I think the biggest challenge for me will be trying to advocate for change in my school, the district, and ultimately the system. It’s no secret that the education system is slow to change, but the change is necessary. I’ve spent the last four and a half years of my schooling learning about how schools should be making an impact in students’ lives and how they continually fall short. I know it will be challenging to be the voice that speaks out and the one who pushes back, but leaning into this tension is the only way we can make effective change.

 

What do you most look forward to?

The kids! That’s what excites me most about teaching. I love building relationships with my students and seeing their growth throughout the year, not only academically, but socially and emotionally too. One of the most important things for me as a teacher is the relationship that my students have with school; I want them to enjoy learning and feel empowered to use what they’re learning to better themselves and their communities.

 

Where do you plan to teach?

I plan to teach in an urban public school, preferably Minneapolis. I love the rich cultural environments that these schools have and feel passionate about serving students who live in my city.

 

Has anything surprised you about the program?

I wasn’t expecting to build such close relationships with my peers. We’ve truly become a family;  They’ve supported me in more ways than I could have ever imagined. I owe a lot of my success in the program to their constant encouragement and guidance.

 

What is the major different between undergraduate and graduate education in your experience?

The major difference between undergrad and the ILP program is the schedule. It’s a tough transition to go from having a few classes spread out across your day to teaching on a full-time schedule (and then occasionally attending night class afterwards). I’ve had to become really disciplined in my daily routines to make sure I’m prepared and can keep up with the work load.

 

How has your experience been with the faculty?

The faculty have been extremely supportive and understanding throughout this entire journey. I feel as though they’ve invested in me as a future educator by challenging me and getting to know me personally.

 

 

Anything else you want to add?

This program is one of the most challenging, yet rewarding things I’ve done. I’ve learned more about myself as a person and as an educator throughout this journey. And for that, I am truly grateful.

Learn more about the teacher education program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Lewis is co-author of article on fall prevention and physical activity resources for older adults

LewisBeth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology,  is a co-author with U of M colleagues from the School of Nursing, the School of Public Health, and the Department of Psychology, an article in The Gerontologist. “Older Adults’ Utilization of Community Resources Targeting Fall Prevention and Physical Activity”  discusses the effects of older adults knowing about and using local community resources to improve their level of physical activity, which is related to fall prevention in older adults. The study shows that the effects are only short-term and suggests research to identify future strategies.

CEHD collaborates with Harvard Graduate School of Education

Reflection Sciences founders Stephanie Carlson, Ph.D., and Philip Zelazo, Ph.D., are professors in CEHD’s Institute of Child Development

Reflection Sciences, a Minnesota start-up founded by two CEHD professors, is teaming up with researchers at the Harvard Graduate School of Education to understand how children develop in both formal and informal child care settings through measures of early learning.

Founded in 2014 by Institute of Child Development professors Stephanie Carlson, Ph.D., and Phil Zelazo, Ph.D., Reflection Sciences provides professional development, training, and tools for assessing and improving executive function skills. Executive function is the set of neurocognitive functions that help the brain organize and act on information. These functions help us pay attention, control behavior, and think flexibly – skills that are key for school readiness.

Through the new collaboration, researchers will be able to track the development of executive function skills over the course of childhood and beyond using Reflection Sciences’ Minnesota Executive Function Scale (MEFS™) App. The MEFS App is a scientifically valid and reliable game-like tablet measure of executive function for ages 2 and up.

“The research literature clearly points to the critical role that early executive function plays in children’s academic and social success, so we need to make sure the study effectively captures children’s skills in this area,” said co-principal investigator Stephanie Jones, Ph.D., a professor of education at Harvard. “MEFS combines the strength of a trusted measure of executive function with the power of big data, allowing us to view the findings from our study within the context of the thousands of other children who have used the app.”

For the Early Learning Study at Harvard, which is supported by the Saul Zaentz Early Education Initiative and led by Jones and Nonie Lesaux, Ph.D., researchers will follow a sample of 5,000 randomly selected families with children ages 3 and 4 years from more than 100 communities throughout Massachusetts. An estimated 40 percent of the children are in an informal childcare setting, such as family care; the other 60 percent are enrolled in a formal setting, such as an early childhood education center. Across four years, researchers will document each child’s early learning experiences and measure outcomes including language, executive function, and academic and social-emotional skills.

This study aims to address important questions about how formal and informal early learning environments impact learning outcomes and developmental gains. The researchers hope to achieve a better understanding of which early education features have the greatest benefits for children, which models of Pre-K work best, why they work, for whom they work, and under what conditions. The team hopes their findings will inform public policy efforts and decisions regarding opportunities and challenges facing early childhood education.

“The Early Learning Study at Harvard is setting the standard for research on early childhood education practices and we are delighted to be able to help them achieve results using our measure,” Carlson said.

RJUS minor, Hsakushee Zan, is driven to support educational equity for immigrant students and their families

Hsakushee Zan is a political science major and Racial Justice in Urban Schooling (RJUS) minor committed to creating a more equitable schooling system. As a refugee immigrant from Myanmar (formerly Burma), she has a deep understanding of the challenges immigrant children face. As a parent, she wants a more equitable education for her children and using her education to make that happen.

Why did you enroll in the RJUS minor?

I am interested in and educational equity and the educational side of public policy. This minor will help me to go on to graduate school in education policy and will also help me to advocate for my fellow immigrant families in public schools with knowledge I gained from my urban education class.

I went to school in refugee camp on border of Thailand and Myanmar due to the conflict in Myanmar. I moved to the U.S. in 2007. My kids were born in this country and are U.S. citizens, but still face inequities in our school system.  I am especially interested in immigrants and immigrant education and am part of a parent advisory group in my community.

What issues do immigrant children face in the schools?

We talk a lot about equity and shortages in teachers of color. There is only one person from our community that speaks our native language that is licensed to teach. The Karen [an ethnic group living on the border of Myanmar and Thailand] community in the Twin Cities is about 12,000 people. This creates a problem when a parent is new and doesn’t know the language.

What has been the most valuable experience in the minor so far?

I love working with every student from diverse backgrounds, especially my service learning experience with the Early Childhood Family Education Program. My assignments included parent involvements in schools. I worked in family literacy with  immigrants from all over the world.

What do you hope to do as a career?

My first goal is to advocate for the quality and the equity of public education for every child. As a refugee immigrant, I always hope to stand for the children of minority and immigrant backgrounds and be the voice for the voiceless as all children have the right to education.

Learn more about education programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and our commitment to equity and social justice.

 

 

 

 

 

Leon co-author on Alzheimer’s study

Art Leon, M.D., professor of exercise physiology in the School of Kinesiology, is a co-author of a study recently published in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias. The article is titled “Determination of Aerobic Capacity via Cycle Ergometer Exercise Testing in Alzheimer’s Disease.” The study investigated older adults with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) to determine individualized aerobic capacity and ability to perform treadmill testing due to balance or gait issues.

First author of the publication is Leon’s former doctoral student Ulf G. Bronas, Ph.D., ATC, associate professor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

 

Strib quotes LaVoi on NFL fan behavior

portrait image of Nicole M. LaVoiIn an article, “Can Philly fans change their image? Yes, but only if they want to,” the Star Tribune quotes Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center. LaVoi and others talk about the hows and whys of fan behavior, with some thoughts about what could happen at this year’s Superbowl.

LaVoi to keynote at first-ever WISTCA women4women event

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, will be the opening keynote for the first-ever women4women event held in conjunction with the 29th Annual Wisconsin Track Coaches Association (WISTCA) Conference held in Madison, WI, February 1-3, 2018. LaVoi’s talk is titled, “Educate.Stimulate.Advocate: Thriving in the Coaching Profession,” and will offer strategies for women coaches as well has how male allies can help.

ICD researchers find early childhood program linked to degree completion

Arthur Reynolds, Ph.D.
Arthur Reynolds, Ph.D.

Participating in an intensive early childhood education program from preschool to third grade is linked to higher educational attainment in mid-life, according to a new study by researchers in CEHD’s Institute of Child Development (ICD).

The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, tracked the progress of more than 1,500 children from low-income neighborhoods in Chicago, from the time they entered preschool in 1983 and 1984 in Child-Parent Centers (CPC) until roughly 30 years later. The children were part of the Chicago Longitudinal Study, one of the longest-running follow-ups of early childhood intervention.

“Children from low-income families are less likely to attend college than their higher-income peers,” said lead author Arthur J. Reynolds, Ph.D., a professor in ICD and director of the Chicago Longitudinal Study. “A strong system of educational and family supports in a child’s first decade is an innovative way to improve educational outcomes leading to greater economic well-being. The CPC program provides this.”

The JAMA Pediatrics study is the first of a large-scale public program to assess impacts on mid-life educational attainment and the contributions of continuing services in elementary school. The study’s co-authors include Suh-Ruu Ou and Judy A. Temple of the University of Minnesota’s Human Capital Research Collaborative.

For the study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the researchers followed the progress of 989 graduates of the Chicago Public School District’s CPC program, which provided intensive instruction in reading and math from preschool through third grade as part of a school reform model.

The program provides small classes, intensive learning experiences, menu-based parent involvement, and professional development. The children’s parents received job skills training, parenting skills training, educational classes and social services. They also volunteered in their children’s classrooms, assisted with field trips, and attended parenting support groups.

The authors compared the educational outcomes of those children to the outcomes of 550 children from low-income families who attended other early childhood intervention programs in the Chicago area. The researchers collected information on the children from administrative records, schools and families, from birth through 35 years of age. More than 90 percent of the original sample had available data on educational attainment.

On average, CPC graduates—whether they participated in preschool only, or through second or third grade—completed more years of education than those who participated in other programs.

For children who received an intervention in preschool, those in the CPC group were more likely to achieve an associate’s degree or higher (15.7 percent vs. 10.7 percent), a bachelor’s degree (11.0 percent vs. 7.8 percent), or a master’s degree (4.2 percent vs. 1.5 percent). These differences translate to a 47 percent increase in an earned associate’s degree and a 41 percent increase in an earned bachelor’s degree.

CPC graduates through second or third grade showed even greater gains: a 48 percent increase in associate’s degree or higher and a 74 percent increase for bachelor’s degree or higher.

“Every child deserves a strong foundation for a successful future, and this report provides more concrete, compelling evidence that investments in early childhood education pay dividends for decades,” said Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. “Chicago is expanding access to early childhood education so every child, regardless of their zip code or parents’ income, can have the building blocks for a lifetime of success.”

According to the study’s authors, successful early childhood programs not only may lead to higher adult educational achievement, but also to improved health. The authors note that adults with less education are more likely to adopt unhealthy habits like smoking and to experience high blood pressure, obesity, and mental health problems than those who complete more schooling.

“This study shows that a well run early childhood intervention program can have benefits well into adult life,” said James Griffin, Ph.D., Deputy Chief of the Child Development Branch at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health.

In previous studies, the researchers showed that CPC program participants have attained higher incomes, and experienced lower rates of serious crime, incarceration, and depression than participants of other programs. CPC has also shown a return on investment: cost-benefit analyses have shown economic returns of 7 to 10 dollars per dollar invested.

The CPC program expanded beyond Chicago beginning in 2012. The program is now also in parts of Minnesota, Illinois, and Wisconsin.

Funding for the study is from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. To read the full research paper titled, “A Multicomponent, Preschool to Third Grade Preventive Intervention and Educational Attainment at 35 Years of Age,” visit the JAMA Pediatrics website.