CEHD News Physical Development & Sport

CEHD News Physical Development & Sport

Stoffregen, Wade publish with co-authors in Human Movement Science

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., and Michael G. Wade, Ph.D., are co-authors on an article published in Human Movement Science. Visual tasks and stance width influence the spatial magnitude and temporal dynamics of standing body sway in 6- to 12-year old children had study results consistent with the idea that effects of stance width and suprapostural visual tasks were well-established by the age of 6 years.

Co-authors are Roberto Izquierdo-Herrera, doctoral candidate at the University of Valencia (Spain), and Prof. Xavier Garcia-Masso and Prof. Luis-Millan Gonzalez, faculty at the University of Valencia. The research was conducted at the U of M under the supervision of  Stoffregen and Wade.

Stoffregen
Wade

PAEL director, lab members present at SHAPE America 2018 and International Chinese Society for Physical Activities and Health (ICSPAH)

The School of Kinesiology’s Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL) team had a strong presence at two conferences held in Nashville, TN, last month.

Lab members successfully presented five separate research studies at the SHAPE America 2018 Conference and Expo, March 20-24. Kinesiology associate professor and PAEL lab director Zan Gao, Ph.D., and current and former advisees June Lee, Ph.D., and Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate, each presented one first-author abstract.  Nan Zeng, Ph.D. candidate, presented two first-author abstracts.

The research covered an array of topics within the field of Physical Activity and Health, ranging from a longitudinal study investigating the 3-year trajectory of physical activity and weight status in school-aged children, to comparing the physiological effects between virtual reality and traditional exercise biking.

Full citations of the presentations at SHAPE America are below.

1. Gao, Z., Lee, J., Stodden, D., Xiang, P., & Zhang, P. (2018, March). Trajectory Changes of
Physical Activity and Weight Status in Children. Paper presented at the annual meeting of
SHAPE, Nashville, Tennessee.

2. Pope, Z., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2018, March). Comparing physiological effects between
virtual reality and traditional exercise biking. Paper presented at the annual meeting of SHAPE,
Nashville, Tennessee

3. Lee, J., Zeng, N., Zhang, Y., & Gao, Z. (2018, March). Children’s psychosocial beliefs and
physical activity levels in physical education. Paper presented at the annual meeting of SHAPE,
Nashville, Tennessee.

4. Zeng, N., Pope, Z., &  Gao, Z. (2018, March). Acute effect of virtual reality on college
students’ psychological outcomes. Paper presented at the annual meeting of SHAPE, Nashville,
Tennessee.

5. Zeng, N., Stodden, D., & Gao, Z. (2018, March). Dynamic relationship between perceived
competence and motor skills in children. Paper presented at the annual meeting of SHAPE,
Nashville, Tennessee.

At the International Chinese Society for Physical Activities and Health, Gao and lab members/advisees Nan Zeng,  Daniel (DJ) McDonough and Wenxi Liu, both first-year Ph.D. students, each presented one first-author abstract.  The presentations covered topics such as the examination of physiological and psychosocial health outcomes during various modes of exergaming and investigating physical activity correlates and behaviors from the perspective of the Social Ecological Model. Notably, Zeng and McDonough won first-place awards for best oral and poster presentations, respectively. Full citations are below.

1. Li, X., Liu, W., Xiong, S., Tao, K., Yang, Z., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2018). Examining associations
among motivation, physical activity and health in Chinese college students. Paper presented at
2018 International Chinese Society for Physical Activities and Health (ICSPAH) annual meeting in
Nashville, TN.

2. Liu, W., Li, X., Xiong, S., Tao, K., Peng, Q., Zeng, N., & Gao, Z. (2018) Associations among
Chinese college students’ physical activity correlates and behaviors: A social ecological model.
Paper presented at 2018 International Chinese Society for Physical Activities and Health
(ICSPAH) annual meeting in Nashville, TN.

3. McDonough, D., Pope, Z., Zeng, N., Lee, J., &  Gao, Z. (2018). College students’
psychosocial outcomes and step counts during single- and double-player exergaming
conditions. Paper presented at 2018 International Chinese Society for Physical Activities and
Health (ICSPAH) annual meeting in Nashville, TN.

4. Xiong, S., Zeng, N., Liu, W., Tao, K., Li, X., & Gao, Z. (2018). College Students’ physical
activity, cardiovascular fitness, body composition and health status in China: A cross-sectional
study. Paper presented at 2018 International Chinese Society for Physical Activities and Health
(ICSPAH) annual meeting in Nashville, TN.

5. Zeng, N., Pope, Z., Lee, J., & Gao, Z. (2018, March). College students’ enjoyment, self-
efficacy, and energy expenditure in exergaming and treadmill walking. Paper presented at 2018
International Chinese Society for Physical Activities and Health (ICSPAH) annual meeting in
Nashville, TN.

 

Stoffregen accepts 3-year appointment as Academic Editor at PLOS ONE

Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, has accepted a 3-year appointment as an Academic Editor at PLOS ONE, the world’s first multidisciplinary Open Access journal. It remains a high-impact leader in peer-reviewed Open Access scientific publishing.

 

Smith presents paper at U of M conference on public engagement

Thomas Smith, Ph.D., affiliated lecturer in the School of Kinesiology, presented a paper, “School District Community Ambassadors for Improving Student Academic Achievement,” at a conference held March 1.  The conference, “Advancing Publicly-Engaged Research, Teaching and Learning to Address Society’s Grand Challenges,” was sponsored by the University of Minnesota. Smith’s presentation advocates the development of a school community ambassador program aimed at supporting students’ academic performance by tightening school community integration. Evidence indicates that the socioeconomic status of a community is positively correlated with the academic performance of students in community

APAL graduate students, adviser publish in Experimental Brain Research

Kinesiology graduate students from the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) and their adviser, Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., have published an online article in the journal, Experimental Brain Research. The citation is: Li, R., Walter, H., Curry, C., Rath, R., Peterson, N., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2018). Postural time-to-contact as a precursor of visually induced motion sickness. The results of the study they conducted provide a qualitatively new type of support for the postural instability theory of motion sickness.

Ruixuan Li is a Ph.D. candidate in the U of M doctoral program in Human Factors and Ergonomics and is a member of APAL, along with Kinesiology graduate students Hannah Walter, Chris Curry, Ruth Rath, and Nicolette Peterson.


 

Dengel presents on body composition analysis at George Mason University

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at George Mason University’s Department of Kinesiology on March 26, 2018. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “Frontiers in Body Composition Analysis: From Infants to NFL Players.”

Konczak gives talk at CCS Colloquium/Perception Lunch

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the HSC Laboratory, presented at the Center for Cognitive Science (CCS) Colloquium/Perception Lunch Talks on Tuesday, March 27.

The title of Konczak’s talk was “Proprioception – the silent sense: What happens, if it is no longer there?” He illustrated what happens if someone experiences complete or partial loss of proprioception by referring to classic clinical studies and showing data from the lab’s work in patients with dystonia, Parkinson’s disease and cortical stroke.

Christopher Curry, Kinesiology PhD student, has two posters at 2018 International Symposium on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Health Care

Christopher Curry, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, has two posters being presented at the 2018 International Symposium on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Health Care in Boston, MA, March 26-28. Curry is advised by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor of movement science in the School and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL). Citations for the posters are below:

Curry, C., Abdelrahman, A., Lowndes, B., Morrow, M.,  & Hallbeck, S. (2018, March). Identifying Higher Ergonomic Risk during a Simulation Task.

Koenig, J., Abdelrahman, A., Curry, C., Mohan, A., Lemaine, V., Noland, S., Hallbeck, S., & Lowndes, B. (2018, March). Preliminary Analysis of Surgeon Body Posture and Musculoskeletal Risk Based on Patient Positioning During Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction.

Zeng, Pope, Lee, and Gao publish in Journal of Clinical Medicine

School of Kinesiology Ph.D. candidates Nan Zeng and Zachary Pope are first and second authors, respectively, on a recent article they published with their adviser, associate professor Zan Gao, Ph.D., in the Journal of Clinical Medicine.

Gao’s former advisee Jung Eun Lee, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Minnesota, Duluth, is third author. Gao is director of the School’s Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory.

The article, titled “Virtual Reality Exercise for Anxiety and Depression: A Preliminary Review of Current Research in an Emerging Field,” discusses the authors’ study, which synthesized literature concerning the effect of virtual reality (VR) exercise on anxiety and depression among various populations. The study concluded that existing evidence is insufficient to support the advantages of VR exercise as a stand-alone treatment over traditional therapy in the alleviation of anxiety and depression, and that more research is needed.

Nan Zeng
Zach Pope
Dr. Zan Gao
Dr. Lee

Bleacher Report quotes LaVoi on impact of UConn basketball success

Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. is quoted in a BleacherReport.com article, “UConn Bad for Women’s Basketball? Not by a Long Shot.” LaVoi contends that the prevalent cultural narrative regarding sport is dominated by narrow media viewpoints that fail to take into account a broad enough spectrum of perspectives.

Zachary Pope, Kinesiology PhD candidate, to present at U’s Doctoral Research Showcase April 3

The University’s eleventh annual Doctoral Research Showcase will include a presentation by Zachary Pope, Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate and advisee of Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL).

The Showcase will be held Tuesday, April 3 from 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. in the Great Hall, Coffman Memorial Union.

The goal of the Doctoral Research Showcase is to help doctoral fellows develop their abilities to talk about their research to audiences outside of their disciplines and to gain exposure for their work with key stakeholders.

Pope’s research presentation is “Use of Wearable Technology to Improve Physical Activity and Eating Behaviors among College Students: A 12-week Randomized Pilot Study.” All Kinesiology colleagues are invited to attend and support Mr. Pope.

For more information about the event or to view a list of all of this year’s participants, visit: z.umn.edu/drs2018.

Tucker Center research cited in article in The Golf Business

Media Coverage & Female Athletes

A recent article in the publication The Golf Business cites research carried out by the Tucker Center for Research in Girls & Women in Sport. “Why positive media exposure is essential for women’s golf” discusses the current limited growth of women’s golf and the important impact that positive media exposure of women’s golf can have on recruitment and retention of women golfers. The 2013 documentary produced by the Tucker Center and tptMN public television station, “Media Coverage & Female Athletes,” was referenced.

Barr-Anderson elected to ACSM Board of Trustees

Congratulations to Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, who was elected to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Board of Trustees. She will serve a three-year term ending in 2021. Barr-Anderson is also director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School.

Konczak publishes with Italian partners in Behavioural Brain Research

Dr. Jürgen Konczak
Dr. Anna Vera Cuppone

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL), has published a paper with colleagues in Behavioural Brain Research. “Consolidation of human somatosensory memory during motor learning” is a collaboration with colleagues from the Italian Institute of Technology. Dr. Anna Vera Cuppone, first author, spent 9 months in HSCL as a visiting scholar, and the data were collected both at HSCL and in Italy.

The main idea behind the paper is to understand how memory is formed during motor learning. Researchers looked at a form of memory related to body awareness, i.e., “how it feels” when the body performs the newly acquired movement patterns. Research in the last years has recognized that such somatosensory and motor learning go hand-in-hand to form “motor memory.” Researchers show how training body awareness improves skill level. The impact of this work relates to neurorehabilitation, because people with stroke that affects the somatosensory cortex, i.e., the part of the brain involved with somatosensory learning, are the most difficult patients to recover. Sensory-based motor learning may help them to recover faster and more completely.

Barr-Anderson delivers seminar presentation to UW-Madison’s Department of Kinesiology

On March 9, Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented “Halting the Obesity Trajectory: Family-based Interventions for African-American Females” to the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on article published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Christiana Raymond-Pope, M.S., doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. The article, “Total and segmental body composition examination in collegiate football players using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual x-ray absorptiometry,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual X-ray absorptiometry when assessing total and segmental percent body fat, fat mass, and fat-free mass in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football athletes. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., a professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., a graduate of the School of Kinesiology, are also co-authors on the article.

Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell, Kinesiology B.S., awarded UROP grant to work in APAL

Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell, Kinesiology B.S. student, has been awarded a UROP grant that will support her work as an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) directed by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.DHayley’s funded project is “The Role of Chromaticity in the Visual Control of Stance.” Her adviser for the project is Dr. Stoffregen, and she will be working directly with Kinesiology Ph.D. student Ruth Rath.

Japan Times article features Inoue and colleagues

image of Yuhei InoueAn article,”College sports reformers stay positive despite setbacks,” appearing in The Japan Times features Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology. The article emphasizes Inoue and colleagues’ joint research project with Japan’s University of Tsukuba, Temple University and Dome Corporation to allow sport teams to be formally recognized as belonging to a university, much as in the U.S. NCAA.

WCCO/CBS MN interviews LaVoi on coaches report card

WCCO/CBS Minnesota has interviewed Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. for the article, “The Report Card: Why Aren’t More Women Coaching Women?” LaVoi talks about the women coaches report card grading, and notes the U of M is only one hire away from an “A” grade.

Spokesman-Recorder on LaVoi’s new hiring report

The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder News Online (MSR) has released an article, “New reports show little progress in college sport race, gender hiring,” featuring the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport’s recently released report, “Head coaches of women’s collegiate teams: A report on seven select NCAA Division-I conferences, 2017-18” authored by Tucker Center co-director and senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. MSR reporter Charles Hallman quotes LaVoi on the very slight rise in hiring of women head coaches of women’s teams, saying “It’s better than going in reverse.” The article also features The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) report, “Racial and Gender Report Card,” authored by Dr. Richard Lapchick (College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida).