Category Archives: Uncategorized

C&I PhD candidate Jeanna Wieselmann receives WPLC award

Jeanna Wieselmann2

Jeanna Wieselmann, a doctoral candidate in STEM Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction was selected for the 2017 Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Award (WPLC) as a “Rising Star” graduate student.

Wieselmann’s research is focused on gender equity in STEM education at the elementary school level. She is interested in gender equity in STEM, particularly in maintaining girls’ interest in STEM in the elementary years and beyond.

Wieselmann will be traveling to Japan this fall to work with colleagues there as they begin to introduce integrated STEM instruction in the classroom.

“I’ll help with STEM curriculum development and implementation, and I’ll study student perceptions of self and STEM, likely examining differences across contexts,” she says, including both different settings within Japan and as compared to the U.S.”

“I’m fortunate be at institution where women are well represented in the STEM fields, in my department in particular,” Wieselmann says of Department of Curriculum & Instruction where both of her advisors, Gillian Roehrig and Julie Brown, are female STEM faculty. “I would like to be a professor at a research institution, so seeing women in that role has definitely inspired me.”

Find out more about the Department of Curriculum & Instruction and the doctoral program in STEM Education.

M.S.W. Grad Partners with Community to Study Sex Trafficking Concerns

Since graduating with a Masters of Social Work degree from the University of Minnesota’s School of Social Work in 2015, Christina Melander has worked as a research fellow at Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center (UROC) to identify sex trafficking trends throughout Minnesota. She hopes to expand her work to lead independent research that furthers scholarship for social justice. Read more about Melander on the UROC website.

Two new books out this week in the “Expanding Literacies in Education” series edited by C&I’s Cynthia Lewis

Two new books in Routledge’s Expanding Literacies in Education series, co-edited by Professor Cynthia Lewis in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, were released this week—Reading Students’ Lives by Catherine Compton-Lilly, Literacy and Mobility by Brice Nordquist.

The Expanding Literacies in Education series features books that highlight the changing landscape and explore new directions and theoretical tools in literacy studies as it is transforming education—including material, embodied, affective, and global emphases; digital and virtual worlds; and transcultural and cosmopolitan spaces. These books engage researchers, graduate students, and teacher educators with new and emerging theoretical approaches to literacy practices in all of their complexities, challenges, and possibilities.

Reading Students’ Lives: Literacy Learning Across Time documents literacy practices as children move through school, with a focus on issues of schooling, identity construction and how students and their parents make sense of students’ lives across time. It is the final book in a series of four that track a group of low-income African American students and their parents across a decade. This is a free-standing volume that breaks new ground both theoretically and methodologically and has important implications for children, schools, and educational research.

Literacy and Mobility: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Agency at the Nexus of High School and College follows students from different tracks of high school English in a “failing” U.S. public school through their first two years after high school. The work illustrates how students help constitute and connect one scene of literacy with others in their daily lives; how their mobile literacies produce, maintain, and disrupt social relations and identities with respect to race, gender, class, language, and nationality; and how they draw upon multiple literacies and linguistic resources to accommodate, resist, and transform dominant discourses.

Lewis’s research draws on critical sociocultural theory to study the relationship between classroom discourse, social identities, and learning in English/Language Arts. She holds the Emma Birkmaier Professorship in Educational Leadership and serves as the Department Chair.

Learn more about Literacy Education programs and research in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

Lewis promoted to full professor

The Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota has approved the promotion of the School of Kinesiology‘s director designate Beth Lewis, Ph.D., to the rank of full professor. A ceremony was held at the MacNamara Alumni Center to honor Dr. Lewis and others who were promoted.

Dr. Lewis’ research focuses on examining the efficacy of nonface-to-face behavioral interventions for physical activity promotion among sedentary adults. Recent studies are examining the effect of exercise on preventing postpartum depression.

Congratulations, Professor Lewis!

C&I student, Vanessa Goodthunder, featured in “Legacy” magazine

Vanessa Goodthunder, and M.Ed. candidate in Social Studies Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was profiled in the University of Minnesota’s Legacy magazine for her commitment to her Native American community on the Lower Sioux Indian reservation in southwestern Minnesota.

Goodthunder was inspired to earn her initial teaching license in social studies education because she noticed that even though many of the students in her school were Native American, none of the teachers were. She ultimately hopes to teach the Dakota language, which she has been studying on campus, and high school social studies in the Twin Cities or on the Lower Sioux reservation.

“Education really helped me thrive,” says Goodthunder. She hopes to inspire the next generation of American Indian students to speak their native language in order to preserve their heritage while reaching their potential as students. Read the full story in Legacy magazine.

Learn more about the M.Ed. and Initial Teaching License program in Social Studies education.  

Consider supporting the Department of Curriculum and Instruction’s educational programs and initiatives to increase diversity in the teacher candidate pool in Minnesota.

Kihl is Executive Council president-elect of the North American Society for Sport Management

Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, was recently elected President-Elect of the Executive Council for the North American Society for Sport Management. Kihl’s term on the council is  three years, and over that time she will serve as President-elect, President, and Past President.

The purpose of the North American Society for Sport Management is to promote, stimulate, and encourage study, research, scholarly writing, and professional development in the area of sport management, in both theoretical and applied aspects.

Tucker Center’s “Media Coverage and Female Athletes” video rebroadcast

Media Coverage and Female Athletes
Media Coverage & Female Athletes

The Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to announce several new airings of the video in May of 2017 of its groundbreaking video, “Media Coverage and Female Athletes.”

tpt MN Channel 2.2
Friday, May 12, 2017 at 5:00 AM
Friday, May 12, 2017 at 11:00 PM

The video builds on a research-based examination of the amount and type of coverage given to female athletes with commentary from expert scholars and award winning coaches and athletes who discuss this timely issue from a variety of perspectives as they help dispel the common—but untrue—myths that “sex sells” women’s sport, and no one is interested in it anyway. Effective strategies for increasing media coverage and creating images which reflect the reality of women’s sports participation and why this is so important are also discussed.

To view the entire program online now, click here. For more information on upcoming broadcasts, click here.

C&I’s Marek Oziewicz receives inaugural Award for Faculty Contribution to Honors Education

Marek Oziewicz,  Marguerite Henry Professor of Children’s and Young Adult Literature in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, has received the first annual Award for Faculty Contribution to Honors Education from the University Honors Program (UHP).

The award recognizes Oziewicz’s many and significant contributions  to Honors education at the University of Minnesota—Twin Cities. Those contributions include teaching an Honors Seminar, anchoring UHP’s first curated Honors experience, and offering samples of Honors teaching at recruitment events.

“Professor  Oziewicz’s Honors Seminar, ‘Fantasy: A Ghastly Wicked Introduction,’ has quickly become a student favorite,” says UHP Director,  Matt Bribitzer-Stull, adding that  Oziewicz anchored the program’s “Dracula in Multimedia” Honors Experience and taught mini-seminars at spring recruitment events to give prospective students a taste of what UHP has to offer.

Oziewicz studies the transformative power of literature for the young reader and teachers. He teaches several courses within the literacy education program area in the department, covering topics such as speculative fiction (especially fantasy), global and multicultural books, and literature-based cognitive modeling for moral imagination, global citizenship, environmental awareness, and justice literacy.

Learn more about literacy education programs and courses in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

 

 

2017 UMAI Day highlights current ASD research

The University of Minnesota Autism Initiative (UMAI) welcomed an audience of 250 people for the third annual UMAI Day: Research to Practice Update. The event, held May 5 at the Masonic Children’s Hospital, featured current University of Minnesota research collaborations relating to autism.

Veronica Fleury, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, and Tami Childs, MN Autism Project coordinator, spoke on implementing evidence-based practices in school settings. ICI’s Jennifer Hall-Lande and Anab Gulaid led a presentation titled ASD Prevalence Research and Community Engagement with Somali and Immigrant Families. See complete list of speakers.

UMAI represents an interdisciplinary collective of researchers, educators, and providers focused on improving the lives of individuals with autism spectrum disorder in the state of Minnesota. Their mission is to unify stakeholders toward the ultimate goals of collaborative research, excellence in education and training, and community partnerships.

C&I, CEHD alumnus Corey Bulman named 2017 Minnesota Teacher of the Year

Corey Bulman, a CEHD alumnus who received his M.Ed. and initial teaching license in English Education from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 2006, recently won the prestigious Minnesota Teacher of the Year award. Bulman was selected from 132 candidates, 27 semifinalists, and 11 finalists to receive the 2017 award from Education Minnesota, an 86,000-member statewide educators union. Candidates include prekindergarten through 12th-grade teachers from public or private schools.

Bulman, who has been a language arts teacher at Mound Westonka High School in Mound, MN since earning his teaching license 17 years ago, was inspired by his high school teachers to reach his potential after years as a struggling student. He wrote in his Teacher of the Year portfolio, “This educational experience taught me an important lesson: education is a gift that is renewed every time it is shared. This fact has driven me to give to others what I was so graciously given all those years ago.”

“Even after 18 years, I still remember this outstanding student,” said Richard Beach, Professor Emeritus of English Education who advised Bulman during his time in graduate school. Beach notes that Bulman is the third graduate from the English education program to receive the Teacher of the Year award.

Bulman told the Star Tribune that his students remain a constant source of inspiration. “I’m so incredibly proud to be their teacher,” he said. “They make me think every single day, they challenge me, they keep me young, they keep ideas fresh and vibrant. I’m very fortunate to be their teacher.”

A former student of Bulman’s, Sara Strother, who is finishing her M.Ed. in Arts in Education this May from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, wrote in support of Bulman’s nomination, “When I was in high school, it mattered a great deal to me how adults treated me. Corey was an adult who showed me he believed I was smart and cared about my ideas. He was honest, funny and made me believe in myself.” She adds, “Corey doesn’t just care about the people in his classroom. He cares about how to make them better people, thinkers and leaders of thoughtful lives.”

Learn more about the teacher education programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Consider supporting the teacher preparation work in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction to help us develop future teachers of the year.

C&I student, Fadumo Mohamed, wins CEHD Multicultural Recognition Award

Lori Helman, Fadumo Mohamed and her parents, Anthony Albecker, Vichet Chhuon

Fadumo Mohamed, a senior in the Elementary Education Foundations program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction received the CEHD Student Multicultural Recognition Award this year. The award is given to a candidate who has made outstanding multicultural efforts to the CEHD community in community outreach as part of their extracurricular or professional work.

Mohamed was nominated by her McNair Scholars program advisor, Lori Helman, on the strength of her many outreach activities. She worked as a literacy mentor in Pratt Community School as part of the America Reads program where she became interested in creating an effective mentoring program for Somali-American youth in the Cedar Riverside neighborhood.

The existing government programs designed to support positive extracurricular activities were transforming into programs to monitor youth for potential future terrorist threats. This was creating a divisive and mistrustful atmosphere in the community, so Mohamed urged the community school to not take the government funding for these programs that offered tutoring and instead to let her provide tutors with the support of the Young Muslims Collaborative (YMC).

In support of that effort she trained almost 40 mentors over two years that were paired with unmotivated or disconnected students. By training mentors who have had similar life experiences, the students are given emotional and strategic support for setting life goals. This is in contrast to programs that attempt to see these youth as potential deviants.

“Fadumo shares the importance of knowing who you are- the values of dual identity, dual language, and works to develop a curriculum that highlights this,” says Helman. “It has been my great honor to work alongside her and learn from her as she gives her full effort toward ensuring equity and positive identity formation for Somali Americans.”

Mohamed will enter the Master of Education and Initial Teaching License program in Elementary Education in the fall where she plans to continue her work towards engaging youth and creating a curriculum that responds to the needs of multicultural student communities.

Learn more about the elementary education programs in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

C&I student Hannah Baxter wins Fulbright Scholarship

Hannah Baxter, an M.Ed. candidate in the Initial Teaching Licensure program in Second Language Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction received the prestigious Fulbright scholarship this year along with 12 other students from the University of Minnesota.

The Fulbright scholarship is meant to foster mutual understandings between people from the United States and other countries through the exchange of knowledge and skills. Baxter will use the Fulbright scholarship to spend a year in Bavaria working as an English teaching assistant with a local teacher. She is looking forward to the opportunity to experience ESL classes in Germany, improve her language skills, and gain a deeper understanding of the German culture after earning her teaching license in both German and English as a second language (ESL) this summer through her M.Ed. program.

“I hope that when I come back, I can bring these experiences with me and use them to be a better teacher for my future students,” said Baxter who plans to teach ESL or German classes in the States upon her return.

Find out more about the degree programs in second language education offered by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Sato publishes book on teacher preparation and development in China

Mistilina Sato, Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, authored the recently released book, Empowered Educators in China:  How High Performing Systems Shape Teaching Quality, part of the “Empowered Educator” series published by Jossey Bass (A Wiley imprint). This work is part of a three-year policy study that produced a series of international case studies and books based on  high performing jurisdictions that examines how provincial and national policies support teaching quality from recruitment through preparation and hiring, to ongoing career development and leadership opportunities.

Sato is also co-author of the cross-case book Empowered Educators: How High-Performing Systems Shape Teaching Quality Around the World with Linda Darling-Hammond, Dion Burns, Carol Campbell, A. Lin Goodwin, Karen Hammerness, Ee-Ling Low, Ann McIntyre, and Ken Zeichner.

The national book launch will take place in Washington D.C. on June 6, 2017 hosted by the National Center on Education and the Economy.

C&I’s Marek Oziewicz quoted in Star Tribune on Neil Gaiman’s “American Gods”

Marek Oziewicz, Professor of Children’s and Young Adult Literature in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction was quoted in the Star Tribune on Neil Gaiman’s book, American Gods, which is being adapted into a TV series on Starz.

Gaimain, who has roots in the Midwest, says “I couldn’t have written [the book] without living in Wisconsin, and Minneapolis and St. Paul being the nearest big cities. It just wouldn’t have worked.”

Oziewicz, who teaches several courses on children’s and adolescent literature says of Gaimain, “His ideas are absolutely unique when it comes to speculative fiction, adding “Asking me to describe him in two sentences is like asking me to describe J.R.R. Tolkien in two sentences,” Oziewicz said. Read the full article in the Star Tribune.

Find out more about literacy education programs offered in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Karen Miksch wins President’s Award for Outstanding Service

Karen Miksch, associate professor in the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (OLPD), is one of 11 people honored with the 2017 President’s Award for Outstanding Service from the University of Minnesota.

This award recognizes exceptional service to the University, its schools, colleges, departments, and service units by an active or retired faculty or staff member. Recipients of this award have gone well beyond their regular duties and have demonstrated an unusual commitment to the University community.

Miksch’s contributions to the college and University have been extraordinary through her work and consultation on legal issues, academic freedom, student admissions, and fostering diversity and inclusion in graduate education.

She will be honored at a reception at Eastcliff on June 15, and the Board of Regents will recognize her at their meeting on May 12. See all of this year’s winners.

350-strong attend Tucker Center Women Coaches Symposium event

Coach Jill Ellis with the TC’s Nicole M. LaVoi

The Tucker Center‘s 4th Annual, 2017 Women Coaches Symposium (WCS) co-hosted by The Alliance of Women Coaches and Gopher Athletics welcomed 350+ female coaches tothe DQ Room at the TCF Bank Stadium last Friday. Jill Ellis, US Women’s National Soccer Team Head Coach, keynoted the event, with presentations by 23 other standouts in coaching and sport science research. The WCS, brainchild of Tucker Center Co-director Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., is the largest professional development, networking, and community building opportunity for women coaches at all levels and all sports in the country. The goal of the WCS is to recruit and retain women in coaching, as female athletes need and deserve same-sex role models.

Red & Black article cites Tucker Center and LaVoi’s research

The Tucker Center  and co-director and Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., are cited in a Red & Black online article, “Female head women’s basketball coaches in NCAA on the decline.” The article cites several sources in noting the decline but ends with an optimistic quote from Dr. LaVoi.

C&I’s Erin Baldinger shares strategies to prepare math teachers for success

Erin Baldinger, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction leverages her experience as a mathematics teacher and educational researcher to prepare aspiring mathematics teachers to effectively communicate their knowledge of math to their students.

“I’ve found that most teachers come into the field with a deep background in math. The problem is that the understanding of mathematics gained through advanced university mathematics courses is not well-connected to the mathematics in the work of teaching,” Baldinger explains.

She distills her experience into five teaching strategies to effectively support all students to engage in mathematics:

Five Techniques for Better Math Teachers

Improving math education and preparation programs for math teachers is a complicated task, but through my experience and research I’ve learned some general principles and strategies that are effective in helping support all students to engage in mathematics.

  1. Believe that all students can learn math. You must believe that every one of your students – no matter their background or current level of knowledge – is capable. Look for each student’s individual strengths and how you can leverage those strengths in the classroom. To me, this is the fundamental underlying principle of being a good teacher.
  2. Use rehearsals as a preparation tool. The most important things that I do in teacher preparation classes is helping my students connect the ideas that we read about to their own practice as teachers. One of the ways I do this is through “coached rehearsals.” One student will lead a discussion while the other members of the class act as the “kids.” During the rehearsal, we have the chance to stop, ask questions, and give feedback, so the discussion leader can get an idea of the kinds of dilemmas they’ll face in a classroom – without the pressure of being in front of a classroom of kids. Later, we use the process of recording video of novice teachers in the classroom and give them the opportunity to analyze their own performance and give feedback to one another.
  3. Explore multiple solutions to math problems. Doing math with my students is critical. When I’m teaching aspiring math teachers, we’ll do math problems that I would then have them do with their own students. During this process, we analyze the problems, looking for multiple solutions strategies. This helps them gain perspective on how their students might approach a problem. It also highlights that there are often multiple mathematically valid ways to approach a task, and the teacher’s role is to help students make connections among the different solution strategies.
  4. Listen. Secondary math teachers must be committed to listening to their students and understanding what they have to say about mathematics. By valuing all student contributions and building on them, you’ll help them cultivate a deeper mathematical understanding.
  5. Understand that there’s no quick fix. With my students, I use multiple strategies to help them learn about teaching. Sometimes it’s rehearsals, sometimes it’s doing math tasks, sometimes we’re watching video or reading and analyzing various aspects of teaching. Having all those touchpoints is critical for me. It’s counterproductive to try and have a quick fix or to think that there’s one technique that will work all the time. Teaching is tough, complex work – but with the right approach I’ve seen my aspiring math teachers – and their pupils – make tremendous strides.
    Read the full article on the CEHD Vision 2020 Blog.

Learn more about the teacher licensure program in mathematics in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Kinesiology’s Nicolette Peterson and Anna Solfest present at 2017 UROP Symposium

Nicolette Peterson and Anna Solfest, both undergraduate students in the School of Kinesiology, participated in today’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) at the U of M.

Peterson, mentored in the UROP program by Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor of movement science and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), presented her research, “The Effect of Feedback on Postural Sway and the Result of Possible Motion Sickness.” Solfest, mentored by Don Dengel, Ph.D., professor of exercise science and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), presented her research, “Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density of Division I Collegiate Male and Female Basketball Athletes.”

Nicolette Peterson
Anna Solfest

LaVoi quoted in Harvard Crimson

Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., is quoted in a Harvard Crimson article, “In Harvard’s Athletics Department, A Stark Wage Gap.” The article critically reviews Harvard athletic coach salaries.