Category Archives: Uncategorized

Learning Technologies Media Lab releases climate change documentary on PBS

Professor Aaron Doering and his team of explorers and educators trek across the unforgiving arctic landscape by dog sled in order to deliver a real-time educational program to millions of students who follow along on the adventure. Their efforts have been captured in a documentary, “The Changing Earth: Crossing the Arctic,” co-produced by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction’s Learning Technologies Media Lab (LTML) and Twin Cities’ Public Television (TPT).

The Changing Earth project was conceived and led by Doering as a way to engage students in a real-world adventure by broadcasting from wherever they find themselves along the journey—on sleds, in tents, and across frozen treks to Inuit villages. “We focus on a culture, we focus on an environmental issue, and now we focus on a social issue,” says Doering of each new adventure-learning expedition.

The first arctic expedition in 2004 took six months. By the end of the trip, Doering was excited to see that they had over three million learners watching from around the world. The program introduces students and viewers to the challenges of the Arctic and the impact of climate change on its indigenous people in a way that resonates with young learners.

The Changing Earth documentary is now available for free on PBS for anyone interested in learning more about the hardships and thrills of crossing the arctic.

Consider supporting the work of LTML to continue the work of documenting the impact of climate change for all learners.

Find out more about the degree programs available in Learning Technologies in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, which houses the LT Media Lab.

New Racial Justice in Urban Schooling minor seeks to improve educational equity

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction is thrilled to launch the Racial Justice in Urban Schooling undergraduate minor, a program that examines the intersections of race, social class, language status, gender or sexual orientation, and how those impact educational equity and social justice.

The program supports undergraduates from any major to explorae their interest in graduate studies in education or activism on educational issues. The minor is designed for students who are deeply interested in education as a social issue, whether or not they want to become a classroom teacher.

Participants will learn to recognize educational practices that marginalize students who are diverse in terms of their race, class, language or gender status, and learn how to support educational equity through alternative approaches. Students will reimagine teaching materials and techniques that hold the possibility for a more equitable and just society.

Learn more, see the curriculum requirements, and read about the educational experiences involved with the minor in Racial Justice in Urban Schooling. Accepting applications now!

 

Family social science degrees reimagined for fall 2017

Students interested in a family social science major will be able to choose from three concentrations. Photo by Erica Loeks.

 

Students considering a family social science degree will have new options for fall 2017. Following a redesign of the curriculum, the Department of Family Social Science has created three concentrations for the family social science undergraduate major that create clear career paths for students interested in improving the lives of diverse families.

“We wanted to help students focus and create a roadmap to careers or an advanced degree in family social science,” said Lynne Borden, department head. “It’s a degree that gives students a great multidisciplinary foundation with the opportunity to be mentored by some of the country’s top researchers in the field.”

Family social science degree concentrations

The family and community engagement concentration is designed for students aspiring to work directly with families in community settings. The family therapy option prepares students for entry-level clinical positions or for advanced study in marriage and family therapy or a practitioner certification, such as the parent education teaching license. The family financial studies concentration is designed for students who are interested in becoming a family financial counselor or coach or other similar career paths.

“Our alumni use their FSoS degrees in a variety of careers,” said Jodi Dworkin, associate department head, professor, and extension specialist.  “Alumni are working as mortgage counselors for banks, program case managers at non-profits and in a variety of teaching positions in K-12 education and in the community.”

For more information contact Jill Trites, director of undergraduate studies,  or visit the FSoS website.

GIFTED program receives $35,000 grant from Newman’s Own Foundation

this year's GIFTED cohort
This year’s GIFTED cohort

The Ghanaian Institute for the Future of Teaching & Education (GIFTED) Women’s Fellowship Fostering program has been awarded a $35,000 grant from Newman’s Own Foundation, the independent foundation created by the late actor and philanthropist, Paul Newman. The award to the GIFTED program was made by Newman’s Own Foundation as part of its commitment to the empowerment of individuals.

The grant to GIFTED will be used to host a national educational conference in Accra, Ghana that showcases the leadership projects and impact the 36 GIFTED Fellows have made in their schools and communities. In addition, the funding will be used to continue to support the leadership network that is being overseen by the University of Education at Winneba.

Focused on strengthening the leadership capacity and visibility of female educators as leaders within the Ghanaian public education system, GIFTED provides professional development, ongoing support, and leadership training to 12 women educators per year. These GIFTED fellows participate in a year-long transformational leadership curriculum, where they develop and implement action projects that support educational outcomes in their schools.

GIFTED was started in June 2013 and is a collaboration between New York University (NYU), the University of Minnesota, the University of Education Winneba, and Mujeres por Africa and is sponsored by Banco Santander.

Dr. Rose Vukovic, director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Educational Psychology and associate professor in the special education program at the University of Minnesota is co-principal investigator on the project, which is led by Kristie Patten Koenig, co-principal investigator from NYU. Local partners are Sakina Aquah and Priscilla Yaaba Ackah from the University of Education, Winneba.

LaVoi quoted on reasons for bias in hiring women soccer coaches

In the past, high school and college women’s soccer teams were coached overwhelmingly  by women. After Title IX was passed in 1972 and women’s sports began attaining greater support and prestige, more men became interested in coaching women’s sports teams. Their numbers grew dramatically while women coaches’ numbers declined.  Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, was quoted in an online article in SBNation, “Soccer’s ugly sexism is keeping women from coaching the beautiful game,” on reasons for the bias in hiring. Lavoi gave a presentation on women coaches in soccer at the 2017 NSCAA convention last January.

 

Kane quoted in Newsday article comparing women athletes to male athletes

Dr. Mary Jo KaneA June 27 article in Newsday ,“Female athletes don’t have to beat men to be the best in their sport”, discusses tennis star John McEnroe comparing world-class talent Serena Williams with male players. He called her the greatest woman to play tennis, “but if she had to just play… the men’s circuit that would be an entirely different story.”

In the article, Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology professor and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, weighs in on the prevalence of comparing women athletes to male counterparts. “The broad issue is why can’t great female athletes simply be great without the constant comparison to men?” she says in the article. ““When North Carolina wins the NCAA Tournament, people don’t demand they go beat Cleveland or the Golden State Warriors. In boxing, you don’t ask the middleweight champion to beat the heavyweight.” When we compare men to women, she says, “it takes away from their greatness. They aren’t allowed to be great on their own.”

Kin PhD student Christiana Raymond is lead author on article published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

Christiana Raymond, M.S., doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the journal, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. The article, “Accuracy and reliability of assessing lateral compartmental leg composition using dual-energy X-ray absoprtiometry,” examined the accuracy and reliability of a novel dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning method in the frontal plane for total, fat, and lean mass quantification of the anterior and posterior upper leg compartments. The article was part of Ms. Raymond’s master’s thesis.

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, Foster Bosch, B.S., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., graduates of the School of Kinesiology, are co-authors on this article.

Mary Jo Kane interviewed on MPR for the 45th anniversary of Title IX

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, will be interviewed by Minnesota Public Radio host Tom Weber on Thursday, June 22, at 11:00 a.m. on 91.1 FM.

Kane will be discussing the 45th anniversary of the passage of Title IX, the social and cultural impact of the law, progress made in the last four decades, and areas of improvement still needed in the world of women’s sports.

Listen to the interview from June 22, 2017: 45 years of Title IX: what’s changed?

Women Coaches Report cited in article on UM Duluth gay coach lawsuit

Data from the Tucker Center’sWomen Coaches Report Card Series,” authored by Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., was cited in a Grand Forks Herald article, “Gay coaches counter University of Minnesota Duluth’s claims in $18 million lawsuit.” UMD’s Director of Marketing and Public Relations noted UMD’s “A grade” for the percentage of women’s teams with female head coaches.

Special education student receives Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle award

Andrea Boh

Andrea Boh, Ph.D. student in the special education program in the Department of Educational Psychology, has been awarded a Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle (WPLC) award for graduate students.

The WPLC award is for women graduate students to recognize their achievements and successes in their field of interest. The criteria for the award includes academic achievements, community involvement, leadership, and passion for the academic and professional career of choice.

Since starting the Ph.D. program, Ms. Boh has taught multiple educational psychology courses, including EPsy 5361, 5362, and 5633. Additionally, she worked with the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) as a Leadership in Neurodevelopmental Disorders (LEND) fellow. This experience allowed her to design and develop a project that focused on determining the extent to which Minnesota Licensed Childcares are conducting standardized developmental screening. As a research assistant on Dr. Veronica Fleury’s team, she investigated caregiver and child engagement in book reading for both children with typical development and those with an autism spectrum disorder.

Working with Dr. LeAnne Johnson as a research assistant in the coming year, Ms. Boh will coach and support early childhood special educators implementing an intervention aimed at remediating core deficits in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder.

Five School of Kinesiology educators awarded Partnership for Affordable Content Grants

The School of Kinesiology is pleased to announce five recipients of the Partnership for Affordable Content Grants awarded by University of Minnesota Libraries.

Physical Activity Program director Brandi Hoffman, assistant professor Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., and Ph.D. student and graduate/teaching assistant, Eydie Kramer, together have been awarded a $3,000 grant. Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor, and Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor, each have received a $1,000 grant.

The grants are intended to provide affordable content to students by supporting individuals who are exploring innovative course content options. The University of Minnesota Libraries created the program to encourage faculty and instructors to work with library staff to implement affordable high-quality content options into their courses as an alternative to high-cost commercial textbooks and other expensive course materials.

 

 

STEM education group forms partnership with educators in Japan

Gillian Roehrig, professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (C&I), led a team of STEM educators to Japan for a one-week visit funded by 3M to initiate STEM education partnerships in Japan. The team included Assistant Professor Julie Brown, Ph.D.; candidate in STEM education Jeanna Wieselmann; Doug Paulson, Minnesota Department of Education STEM Specialist); and Tom Meagher, Ph.D. , the Owatonna K-12 STEM Coordinator and C&I alumni in Science Education.

The group was hosted by Professor Yoshisuke Kumano and Dr. Tomoki Saito of Shizuoka University. Dr. Saito spent time as a Ph.D. student in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction as a visiting scholar last year. Professor Kumano’s team had recently visited the STEM education center to learn about K12 integrated STEM curriculum and research. This visit cemented the partnership, as the STEM education experts from the department presented research on integrated K-12 STEM education and provided a K-12 STEM workshop for principals and teachers from local schools.

The UMN STEM delegation also visited the RuKuRu STEM student camp at the Shizuoka Children’s Musuem,  the Shizuoka Prefectural High School of Science & Technology, and Sagano Super Science and Global High School Kyoto to explore possible exchange opportunities for STEM high schools students and teachers.

This fall, Wieselmann will spend three months studying at Shizuoka University as a visiting scholar, where she will be extending her research on gender issues related to STEM teaching and learning at the elementary level in Japan. Roehrig will also be returning in August to present with the Shizuoka STEM group at the Japan Society for Science Education. In addition, a research project has been established with Dr. Takahiro Kayano that explores argumentation in K-12 STEM classrooms in Shizuoka and Owatonna, cementing the fruitful partnership between the two the STEM education area in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and their colleagues in Japan.

Learn more about the STEM education Ph.D. program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Consider making a gift to support ongoing partnerships in STEM education.

C&I PhD candidate Jeanna Wieselmann receives WPLC award

Jeanna Wieselmann2

Jeanna Wieselmann, a doctoral candidate in STEM Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction was selected for the 2017 Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Award (WPLC) as a “Rising Star” graduate student.

Wieselmann’s research is focused on gender equity in STEM education at the elementary school level. She is interested in gender equity in STEM, particularly in maintaining girls’ interest in STEM in the elementary years and beyond.

Wieselmann will be traveling to Japan this fall to work with colleagues there as they begin to introduce integrated STEM instruction in the classroom.

“I’ll help with STEM curriculum development and implementation, and I’ll study student perceptions of self and STEM, likely examining differences across contexts,” she says, including both different settings within Japan and as compared to the U.S.”

“I’m fortunate be at institution where women are well represented in the STEM fields, in my department in particular,” Wieselmann says of Department of Curriculum & Instruction where both of her advisors, Gillian Roehrig and Julie Brown, are female STEM faculty. “I would like to be a professor at a research institution, so seeing women in that role has definitely inspired me.”

Find out more about the Department of Curriculum & Instruction and the doctoral program in STEM Education.

M.S.W. Grad Partners with Community to Study Sex Trafficking Concerns

Since graduating with a Masters of Social Work degree from the University of Minnesota’s School of Social Work in 2015, Christina Melander has worked as a research fellow at Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center (UROC) to identify sex trafficking trends throughout Minnesota. She hopes to expand her work to lead independent research that furthers scholarship for social justice. Read more about Melander on the UROC website.

Two new books out this week in the “Expanding Literacies in Education” series edited by C&I’s Cynthia Lewis

Two new books in Routledge’s Expanding Literacies in Education series, co-edited by Professor Cynthia Lewis in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, were released this week—Reading Students’ Lives by Catherine Compton-Lilly, Literacy and Mobility by Brice Nordquist.

The Expanding Literacies in Education series features books that highlight the changing landscape and explore new directions and theoretical tools in literacy studies as it is transforming education—including material, embodied, affective, and global emphases; digital and virtual worlds; and transcultural and cosmopolitan spaces. These books engage researchers, graduate students, and teacher educators with new and emerging theoretical approaches to literacy practices in all of their complexities, challenges, and possibilities.

Reading Students’ Lives: Literacy Learning Across Time documents literacy practices as children move through school, with a focus on issues of schooling, identity construction and how students and their parents make sense of students’ lives across time. It is the final book in a series of four that track a group of low-income African American students and their parents across a decade. This is a free-standing volume that breaks new ground both theoretically and methodologically and has important implications for children, schools, and educational research.

Literacy and Mobility: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Agency at the Nexus of High School and College follows students from different tracks of high school English in a “failing” U.S. public school through their first two years after high school. The work illustrates how students help constitute and connect one scene of literacy with others in their daily lives; how their mobile literacies produce, maintain, and disrupt social relations and identities with respect to race, gender, class, language, and nationality; and how they draw upon multiple literacies and linguistic resources to accommodate, resist, and transform dominant discourses.

Lewis’s research draws on critical sociocultural theory to study the relationship between classroom discourse, social identities, and learning in English/Language Arts. She holds the Emma Birkmaier Professorship in Educational Leadership and serves as the Department Chair.

Learn more about Literacy Education programs and research in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

Lewis promoted to full professor

The Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota has approved the promotion of the School of Kinesiology‘s director designate Beth Lewis, Ph.D., to the rank of full professor. A ceremony was held at the MacNamara Alumni Center to honor Dr. Lewis and others who were promoted.

Dr. Lewis’ research focuses on examining the efficacy of nonface-to-face behavioral interventions for physical activity promotion among sedentary adults. Recent studies are examining the effect of exercise on preventing postpartum depression.

Congratulations, Professor Lewis!

C&I student, Vanessa Goodthunder, featured in “Legacy” magazine

Vanessa Goodthunder, and M.Ed. candidate in Social Studies Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was profiled in the University of Minnesota’s Legacy magazine for her commitment to her Native American community on the Lower Sioux Indian reservation in southwestern Minnesota.

Goodthunder was inspired to earn her initial teaching license in social studies education because she noticed that even though many of the students in her school were Native American, none of the teachers were. She ultimately hopes to teach the Dakota language, which she has been studying on campus, and high school social studies in the Twin Cities or on the Lower Sioux reservation.

“Education really helped me thrive,” says Goodthunder. She hopes to inspire the next generation of American Indian students to speak their native language in order to preserve their heritage while reaching their potential as students. Read the full story in Legacy magazine.

Learn more about the M.Ed. and Initial Teaching License program in Social Studies education.  

Consider supporting the Department of Curriculum and Instruction’s educational programs and initiatives to increase diversity in the teacher candidate pool in Minnesota.

Kihl is Executive Council president-elect of the North American Society for Sport Management

Lisa A. Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, was recently elected President-Elect of the Executive Council for the North American Society for Sport Management. Kihl’s term on the council is  three years, and over that time she will serve as President-elect, President, and Past President.

The purpose of the North American Society for Sport Management is to promote, stimulate, and encourage study, research, scholarly writing, and professional development in the area of sport management, in both theoretical and applied aspects.

Tucker Center’s “Media Coverage and Female Athletes” video rebroadcast

Media Coverage and Female Athletes
Media Coverage & Female Athletes

The Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport is proud to announce several new airings of the video in May of 2017 of its groundbreaking video, “Media Coverage and Female Athletes.”

tpt MN Channel 2.2
Friday, May 12, 2017 at 5:00 AM
Friday, May 12, 2017 at 11:00 PM

The video builds on a research-based examination of the amount and type of coverage given to female athletes with commentary from expert scholars and award winning coaches and athletes who discuss this timely issue from a variety of perspectives as they help dispel the common—but untrue—myths that “sex sells” women’s sport, and no one is interested in it anyway. Effective strategies for increasing media coverage and creating images which reflect the reality of women’s sports participation and why this is so important are also discussed.

To view the entire program online now, click here. For more information on upcoming broadcasts, click here.

C&I’s Marek Oziewicz receives inaugural Award for Faculty Contribution to Honors Education

Marek Oziewicz,  Marguerite Henry Professor of Children’s and Young Adult Literature in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, has received the first annual Award for Faculty Contribution to Honors Education from the University Honors Program (UHP).

The award recognizes Oziewicz’s many and significant contributions  to Honors education at the University of Minnesota—Twin Cities. Those contributions include teaching an Honors Seminar, anchoring UHP’s first curated Honors experience, and offering samples of Honors teaching at recruitment events.

“Professor  Oziewicz’s Honors Seminar, ‘Fantasy: A Ghastly Wicked Introduction,’ has quickly become a student favorite,” says UHP Director,  Matt Bribitzer-Stull, adding that  Oziewicz anchored the program’s “Dracula in Multimedia” Honors Experience and taught mini-seminars at spring recruitment events to give prospective students a taste of what UHP has to offer.

Oziewicz studies the transformative power of literature for the young reader and teachers. He teaches several courses within the literacy education program area in the department, covering topics such as speculative fiction (especially fantasy), global and multicultural books, and literature-based cognitive modeling for moral imagination, global citizenship, environmental awareness, and justice literacy.

Learn more about literacy education programs and courses in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.