CEHD News Graduate Students

CEHD News Graduate Students

Joey Kronzer to serve as volunteer assistant tennis coach for Hamline University

Joey Kronzer, a current Kinesiology master’s student with an emphasis in sport and exercise psychology, and a member of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, has been named the Volunteer Assistant Coach of the Hamline University Men’s and Women’s Tennis Teams. The complete announcement is available here.

Kronzer is advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, professor in the School of Kinesiology.

Kinesiology’s Betker and Orr involved in 3MT® events


In preparation for this year’s 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition, CEHD is hosting a Mentoring Workshop on February 1. Last year’s University-wide 3MT winner Madeleine Orr, a sport management doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology will serve as a panelist at this event.

In addition, Orr and Kinesiology’s Morgan Betker, doctoral student with a focus on exercise physiology and previous winners of the CEHD 3MT competition are asked to be judges for the preliminary round of the competition, which will be held on Monday, February 26 and Thursday, March 1 of this year.

Madeleine Orr
Madeleine Orr
Morgan Betker
Morgan Betker

Sport Management Graduate Student Madeleine Orr interviewed for CEHD’s Vision 2020

Madeleine Orr, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology with the emphasis on sport management was recently interviewed for the CEHD Vision 2020 blog about her research on the economic, social and environmental impact of large-scale international sporting events.

As Minneapolis prepares for the upcoming Super Bowl events, Orr talks in the article titled “Does Hosting Sports Events like the Olympic Games or Super Bowl Really Benefit Cities?“, about how Minneapolis prepares for the upcoming “Big Game” events, as well as the impact that hosting the Olympics can have on cities.

 

Kinesiology’s Morgan Betker nominated for Midwest Association of Graduate Schools Excellence in Teaching Award

Morgan Betker

Morgan Betker, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, was nominated by the U of M Graduate School for the prestigious Midwest Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) Excellence in Teaching Award. As the only doctoral student nominated, Betker will represent the U of M at MAGS’ 2018 regional competition. The award will be presented at the MAGS 74rd Annual Meeting, April 4-6, 2018, in Grand Rapids, MI.

MAGS Excellence in Teaching Award recognizes and encourages graduate students for future service as college and university faculty. It supports the Council of Graduate Schools’ (CGS) efforts to promote Preparing Future Faculty to meet needs in academia.

Betker is pursuing her Ph.D. in Kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise physiology, advised by Dr. Beth Lewis.

 

 

Tseng publishes on Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) in Journal of Motor Behavior

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D.
Dr. Konczak
Y-Ling Tseng
Dr. Tseng

Yu-Ting Tseng, Ph.D. (2017), former advisee of Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, is primary author on an article recently published in Journal of Motor Behavior.  The article is titled “Position Sense Dysfunction Affects Proximal and Distal Arm Joints in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. ”
Co-authors are Chia-Liang Tsai (National Cheng Kung Univeristy, Taiwan,), Fu-Chen Chen (National Kaohsiung Normal University, Taiwan), and Jürgen Konczak.

Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects up to 6% of all school-age children. Children with DCD have problems with coordinating  movements, may have balance problems and show poor motor skill learning. This study assessed wrist joint position sense in a cohort of Taiwanese middle school children with DCD and related it to the observable motor deficits. Results document that children with DCD is associated with proprioceptive dysfunction of the wrist/hand complex, which likely contributes to the motor problems in children with DCD.

Yu-ting Tseng is currently a post-doc at the Division of Child Health Research, Institute of Population Health Sciences in the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in Zhunan, Taiwan.

Testing wrist proprioception in children in Taiwan

 

Gao and colleagues publish in BioMed Research International

Dr. Zan Gao
Gao
Nan Zeng
Zeng

Zan Gao, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology associate professor, has published an article with colleagues in BioMed Research International.  This study synthesized literature concerning casual evidence of effects of various physical activity programs on motor skills and cognitive development in typically developed preschool children. Of the five studies, four (80%) showed significant and positive changes in language learning, academic achievement, attention, and working memory.

Nan Zeng, lead author on the article, is a Ph.D. candidate in Kinesiology and is advised by Dr. Gao.

The full citation:
Effects of Physical Activity on Motor Skills and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood: A Systematic Review.” N. Zeng, M. Ayyub, H. Sun, X Wen, P Xiang, Z. Gao. BioMed Research International, 2017.

 

 

Grad students present interdisciplinary research ideas in KIN 8980

For their final project, students in KIN 8980 – Graduate Research Seminar in Kinesiology presented ideas for research projects “that bridge” across different School of Kinesiology emphasis areas.

KIN 8980 is required for all M.S./M.A. and Ph.D. students, and covers topics such as responsible conduct of research and proposal design. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School, taught the course this fall.

During the semester, students discussed the wide spectrum of faculty and student research activities across the department. They then were divided into teams to design potential interdisciplinary research projects to present to the class, and face critical questions from their audience.

Here are the presentations (YouTube playlist):

 

 

East African Mother-Daughter study participants celebrate “graduation”

image of Muna Mohamed and Chelsey Thul
Muna Mohamed and Chelsey Thul

On December 1, the study, “Impact of an East African Mother-Daughter Physical Activity Program and Co-Designed Activewear” (a follow-up to Thul and colleagues’ 2013-15 study, “Impact of Culturally Sensitive Apparel Co-Design on the Physical Activity of East African Adolescent Girls”), held a “graduation party” at the Cedar Riverside Community School in Minneapolis to celebrate the completion of their year-long, ground-breaking study.  The study introduced young East African girls and their mothers to ways to engage in healthy living and included the design and production of culturally sensitive activewear.

The study was conducted by:

  • Chelsey Thul, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology, together with:
  • Muna Mohamed, kinesiology graduate student;
  • Elizabeth Bye, Ph.D., professor and department head of the Apparel Design Program in the College of Design;
  • Robin Carufel, apparel design graduate student;
  • Jennifer Weber, community partnership coordinator and student activities director, Cedar Riverside Community School; and
  • Mary Marczak, director of Urban Family Development and Evaluation, U of M Extension.

Beginning last January, East African daughters and their mothers in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood met every Monday evening for 10 weeks at the People’s Center to participate in physical activities (e.g., basketball, yoga, strength training), learn about healthy eating, prepare and eat a healthy snack together, and design their own culturally appropriate physical activity outfit. They also learned sewing basics, including how to sew on a button, use sewing machines, and sew a bag to carry their activewear. After the weekly programming ended and while the activewear was being produced, the program facilitated every other month field trips to the Science Museum, Minnesota Zoo, and YWCA that continued to incorporate physical activity and healthy eating.

At the graduation, the daughters and mothers had fun revealing and wearing their new outfits, enjoying a celebratory meal and cake, receiving program completion certifications, and opening their thank you gifts including an additional gym bag, athletic shoes, and a three-month family gym membership.

This project is supported by a grant from University of Minnesota Extension. Survey data was collected throughout the program. Additionally, focus groups were conducted with the daughters and mothers prior to the graduation to learn about their experiences with the program, as well as the impact the physical activity and nutrition lessons and experiences and new activewear have had on their healthy living. The data will be analyzed this spring…Stay tuned for the results!

See more photos here …

Elangovan, Konczak publish in Nature Scientific Reports

Naveen Elangovan Ph.D.
Dr. Elangovan

Naveen Elangovan, Ph.D., post-doctorate researcher the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL), is the first author of an article titled “A robot-aided visuo-motor training that improves proprioception and spatial accuracy of untrained movement” that is published in The Nature Scientific Reports.

The study examined to what extent a sensory training of body leads to improvements in motor function.  The study found that a short 45-min training is already sufficient to see changes in the accuracy of perceiving joint position and joint movement. This project was a collaboration with engineering colleagues at Nanyang Technological University of Singapore and Harvard University, USA. Co-authors are former HSCL member Joshua Aman, Ph.D. and lab director Jürgen Konczak,  Ph.D.

Graduate School announces Kinesiology Ph.D. Madeline Orr winner of University-wide 3MT® Competition

Madeleine Orr accepts her prize with School of Kinesiology supporters. From left, Nina Wang, graduate student coordinator; Dr. Michael Wade , DGS; Dr. Beth Lewis, director of the School of Kinesiology; Orr; and Dr. Yuhei Inoue, Orr’s adviser.

Congratulations to Madeleine Orr, Kinesiology Ph.D. student in the Sport Management emphasis,  who won the Second Annual University-wide 3MT® Competition held December 1. The competition, sponsored by the Graduate School, featured finalists from collegiate- and campus-level competitions. Orr will represent the University of Minnesota at the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) 3-Minute Thesis competition in Spring 2018. She also was awarded a $500 prize.

The competition was covered by the Star Tribune in the December 18 Variety section.

The 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition that challenges students to communicate the significance of their projects without the use of props or industry jargon, in just three minutes. The exercise is designed to develop academic, presentation, and research communication skills along with the ability to quickly explain research in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

Orr’s presentation is titled “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” She placed first in CEHD’s 3MT® Competition last spring. She is advised by sport management assistant professor Yuhei Inoue.

 

Pope panelist at CEHD Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship workshop

Zachary Pope, Ph.D. candidate in the School of Kinesiology and advised by Kinesiology associate professor Zan Gao, Ph.D., was one of three current Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship recipients invited to speak at the CEHD Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship Workshop on November 17. Along with three CEHD faculty, Pope and the two other current Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship recipients discussed how to best construct a strong Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship application packet, with a large focus on drafting the associated research proposal to the 90 doctoral students in attendance. The workshop video is available on YouTube.

The Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship gives the University’s most accomplished Ph.D. candidates an opportunity to devote full-time effort to an outstanding research project by providing time to finalize and write a dissertation during the fellowship year. This award includes a stipend of $25,000 for the academic year (September-May), tuition for up to 14 thesis credits each semester (fall & spring), and subsidized health insurance through the Graduate Assistant Health Plan.

Konczak, Tseng publish article in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D.
Dr. Konczak
Y-Ling Tseng
Dr. Tseng

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, is a co-author on an article recently published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.  Age-Related Decline of Wrist Position Sense and its Relationship to Specific Physical Training” examines the effects of aging on proprioception (a person’s perception of their limb and body positions necessary for motor control) by comparing wrist acuity in older and younger populations, and explores the effects of  training or regular physical activity on preserved wrist proprioception.

Konczak’s former advisee Yu-Ting Tseng, Ph.D. (2017), is also an author on the article. She is currently a post-doc at the Division of Child Health Research, Institute of Population Health Sciences in the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in Zhunan, Taiwan.

 

Orr to compete in University-wide presentation of 3-Minute-Thesis

Madeleine Orr

Last spring, Madeleine Orr, School of Kinesiology Ph.D. student, won the College of Education and Human Development’s 3-Minute Thesis Competition (3MT) with her presentation, “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” On December 1 she will take the podium again as the University of Minnesota Graduate School hosts the U of M’s 3MT preliminary-round winners in a second competition. Orr will present along with Ruben D’sa from the College of Science and Engineering, Irene Bueno Padilla from the College of Veterinary Medicine, and Amritha Yellamilli from the Medical School.

Originally established by the University of Queensland in 2008, 3MT challenges research students to communicate the significance of their projects to a general audience in just three minutes, with the aid of a single, static slide.

Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend and support the presenters. The winner will represent the University of Minnesota at the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) 3MT competition. In addition, participants will be invited to present their research at the upcoming Board of Regents meeting.

Orr is in the Sport Management emphasis and is advised by Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D.

Presentations are from 9-10 a.m. in 402 Walter Library. Awards and reception follow. Register to attend here.

 

 

 

Raymond-Pope, Dengel, and Bosch publish in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Kinesiology doctoral student Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on an article written with kinesiology professor Donald Dengel, Ph.D., and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., and published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 

The article, “Total and Segmental Body Composition Examination in Collegiate Football Players Using Multifrequency Bia and Dxa,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between two different means of measurement used in assessing total and segmental percent body fat.

Raymond-Pope is currently advised by Dengel, and Bosch is a former advisee who graduated with his Ph.D. in kinesiology in 2014. Dengel is the director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology in the School of Kinesiology.

Raymond-Pope
Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Don Dengel
Dr. Tyler Bosch
Dr. Bosch

 

LaVoi and Baeth publish in The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018

LaVoi
Baeth

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport in the School of Kinesiology, and Anna Baeth, Kinesiology Ph.D.student and advisee of Lavoi, have published a chapter in the The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018. The article, “Women and Sports Coaching,” addresses the ways scholarship can be used to inform and influence the goal to increase the number of women coaching sports, currently in the minority around the world.

 

Kinesiology master’s student Joey Kronzer presents at AASP conference through COGS Travel Grant award

Joey KronzerJoey Kronzer, a School of Kinesiology second year master’s student in the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab, presented his research, “Using E-Prime 2.0 to develop sport-specific video analysis training protocols,” at the 32nd Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference (AASP) held Oct. 18–Oct. 21 in Orlando, FL. Kronzer presented and attended at the conference through a travel grant award from the Council of Graduate Students (COGS).

Kronzer is an advisee of Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D.

 

LaVoi to participate in CEHD Alumni and Graduate Networking Event on Nov. 9

Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, will participate in a speaking panel at a CEHD Alumni and Graduate Networking Event on Thursday, November 9, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at McNamara Alumni Center, University Hall.  The event, titled “Blaze Your Trail: Crafting a Career with Passion and Innovation,” features CEHD alumni who have forged unique career paths outside their degree programs.  The panel will share their stories and ideas on channeling creativity into professional success.

The event is geared to CEHD graduate and professional students, and an RSVP required. See more details here.

Doctoral student Eydie Kramer presents at The Obesity Society meeting

Eydie Kramer, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology and advised by Dr. Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., is presenting at The Obesiety Society annual meeting on October 31, 2017 in Washington D.C.

Kramer will present a study on yoga intervention for African-American women that was conducted in the Behavioral Physical Activity Lab (BPAL) in 2016. Her poster titled “I Heart Yoga! A Pilot, Culturally-Tailored Yoga Intervention for African-American Women With Obesity” was selected as a top 10 abstract.

 

Kinesiology graduate students  Kronzer, Wood, and White to present at AASP Conference

Current School of Kinesiology and Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory graduate students Joey Kronzer (M.S.), Kristin Wood (Ph.D.), and Andrew White (Ph.D.) will be presenting their research at the upcoming Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) annual conference in Orlando, Fl, on October 18th–21st.

  • Kronzer will be giving a 15-minute talk titled “Using E-Prime 2.0 to Develop Sport-Specific Video Analysis Training Protocols.
  • Wood will be presenting a paper titled “Analyzing the Effectiveness of an Injury Education Program in Increasing Novice Marathoners’ Self-Efficacy in Adopting Proper Injury Management Strategies.
  • White will be presenting a paper titled “Breadth or depth? Evaluating psychological, performance, and injury outcomes following multidimensional or focused mental skills training in marathoners.

All three students are advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Lab.

Joey Kronzer
Andrew White
Kristin Wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biltz to present at Pediatric Work Physiology Meeting XXX in Katerini, Greece

School of Kinesiology senior lecturer George Biltz, M.D., will be attending the Pediatric Work Physiology Meeting XXX, October 3-8, in Katerini in Macedonia, Greece. The conference is sponsored by the European Group of Pediatric Work Physiology, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary.

On Oct. 6, Biltz will present a poster he co-authored with Kinesiology alumnus Christopher Lundstrom, Ph.D.,  titled “Time series variability of steady state RER, tidal volume and VO2 show a common response to marathon training in older adolescents.” The poster is a continuation of research on physiological time series analysis that they previously reported on at PWP 2015 in Utrecht ,Netherlands, and at the North American Society for Pediatric Exercise Medicine (NASPEM) in 2016 in Knoxville, TN. Biltz will also co-chair an oral presentation session on Oct. 7 on Physical Activity.