CEHD News PASS Lab

CEHD News PASS Lab

LaVoi to serve three-year term on Faculty Senate

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport was chosen to serve as representative to the University Faculty Senate for a three-year term beginning July 1, 2018.  

The Faculty Senate at the University of Minnesota is comprised of faculty and faculty-like academic professional representatives from the all University of Minnesota campuses and concerns itself with faculty welfare, educational, and research matters.

 

Barr-Anderson publishes in Journal of Adolescent Health

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory, published along with colleagues from the School of Public Health a manuscript brief in the Journal of Adolescent Health (impact factor of 3.612).

The publication titled “Physical Activity and Sociodemographic Correlates of Adolescent Exergamers” examines demographic and behavioral characteristics of adolescents who engage in active video games, or exergamers.

 

 

Weiss’s work with innovative program, Girls on the Run, featured in Connect

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was featured along with her research in the Spring issue of Connect, the magazine of the College of Education and Human Development.

The article, Girls on the Run, focuses on Weiss’s work in determining the success of an innovative youth development program that uses running and other physical activities as a platform for teaching life skills and healthy habits. Girls on the Run was started in 1996 in Charlotte, NC, with a small group of 13 girls, and has grown to over 200 councils in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Weiss’ study was designed to evaluate whether the organization was effective in achieving its goals. Her study results revealed that girls participating in the program compared favorably to a control group in their ability to manage emotions, resolve conflict, help others, and make intentional decisions. In addition, girls who started the program below the group average made
dramatic and lasting improvement in physical activity level, confidence, and connection to others.

 

LaVoi, Tucker Center report data cited in the Kansan

The University of Kansas’ Daily Kansan article, “Kansas athletes and coaches see importance in women leadership,” cites data available in the Tucker Center‘s Women Coaches Research Series & Report Card and quotes Tucker Center Co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., with the Kansas’ low report card score and LaVoi speaking on what language such as “choosing the best coach” is actually code for.

Lewis named Fellow by the Society of Behavioral Medicine

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., director and professor in the School of Kinesiology, was named Fellow by the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) at their 39th annual conference held April 11-14 in New Orleans. The organization confers fellow status “in recognition of outstanding contributions to the advancement of the science and practice of behavioral medicine. Among the considerations for this distinction are academic, professional, clinical, legislative, or other meritorious accomplishments.”

At the conference, Lewis co-chaired a session, “How Do We Incentivize Physical Activity?” and presented a poster with postdoctoral fellow Katie Schuver, “The effect of exercise and wellness interventions on preventing postpartum depression and stress: The Healthy Mom II Trial.” She also presented another poster, “Effective and efficient email management in academic leadership roles.”

Kinesiology well-represented at Sport Social Justice Symposium

The U of M was host to the Social Justice Through Sport and Exercise Psychology Symposium on April 5-7 at the Recreation and Wellness Center on the Twin Cities campus. A number of faculty, students, alumni, and associates from the School of Kinesiology (listed below) were involved in the program and presentations.

The symposium opened with welcoming remarks from the U of M’s Jean Quam, Ph.D., dean, CEHD; Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., co-director, Tucker Center;  and Anna Baeth, doctoral student in kinesiology and member of the organization’s Conference Committee.

Sessions:

  • Cultural Competence in Sports Medicine Psychology: Mental Health Concerns and Religious Coping as Marginalized Topics of Research and Intervention with Injured Athletes

    • Mental Health Concerns Among Athletes Sustaining Sports Related Concussions, Kristin N. Wood and Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D.
    • Mental Health Concerns Among Athletes Sustaining Musculoskeletal Injuries, Francesca Principe and Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D.
    • A Thematic Analysis of Religiosity and Spirituality in Coping with Sport Injuries, Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., Kristin N. Wood, Andrew C. White, Ph.D., Amanda J. Wambach, and Victor J. Rubio, Ph.D. (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
  • International Social Justice Efforts
    • The What, How, and Why of Community-Based Participatory Research for Empowering Physical Activity for All: A Tale of Two Social Justice Projects, Chelsey Thul, Ph.D., and Muna Mohamed
    • Creating Safe Space in a Hostile Place: Exploring the Marathon of Afghanistan Through the Lens of Safe Space, Madeleine Orr and Anna Baeth
  • Access to Physical Activity as a Social Justice Issue
    • Physical Literacy as a Social Justice Issue, Jennifer Bhalla (Pacific University)

Symposia:

  • International Sport Management and Social ResponsibilityLisa A. Kihl, Ph.D.
  • Social Justice: The Role of the Sport CoachNicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., and Maya Hamilton, Ph.D.
  • Creating Social Change for Girls & Women in Sport: Tucker Center Education, Research and Outreach ProjectsNicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Anna Baeth, Courtney Boucher, Mikinzee Salo, Veronica Rasmussen, Nicole Varichak, and Matea Wasend
  • The Paralympic Games: Who’s In and Who’s Left Out?, Jo Ann Buysse, Ph.D.

LaVoi featured in WCCO piece on Augusta National

WCCO/CBS Minnesota interviewed Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer, for an online piece, “Augusta National Turns New Page With Women’s Tournament.” LaVoi talks about the importance of women becoming members of the Club and how it impacts young girls and boys.

Augusta National road sign and woman golfer with video play button

Borton Endowment for Promotion of Girls & Women in Sport Leadership receives $10k donation

image of Pam Borton, smiling with grey shirt and magenta scarfThe Pam Borton Endowment for the Promotion of Girls and Women in Sport Leadership fund, established in 2014 and housed in the Tucker Center for Girls & Women in Sport, recently received a $10,000 gift in support of the Borton Fellowship. The purpose of the Fellowship is to promote leadership among girls and women within a sports context. Since its inception, three outstanding Kinesiology and Sport Management graduate students have received the Fellowship: Marnie Kinnaird, Caroline Heffernan, and Matea Wasend.

The Fellowship is named after former University of Minnesota head women’s basketball coach, Pam Borton, who was named to the position in 2002. Borton created a culture of excellence within the women’s program both on and off the court. Averaging 20 wins per season in her 12-year tenure at the U of M, Borton guided the Golden Gophers to a Final Four, three Sweet Sixteens, six NCAA Tournament appearances and three seasons of 25 or more wins. She is the winningest head coach in the program’s history. Under Borton’s guidance, female student-athletes achieved unparalleled academic success: Her teams earned an overall 3.0 grade-point average every year of her tenure. Borton’s Gophers also garnered a league-best 88 Academic All-Big Ten honorees over the span of her coaching career.

Kane invited panelist for Lapchick lecture at Humphrey

Dr. Mary Jo KaneMary Jo Kane,  Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, is an invited panelist at an April 16 lecture by Dr. Richard Lapchick, author, human rights activist, pioneer for racial equality and internationally recognized expert on sports issues. Lapchick is a professor in the College of Business at the University of Central Florida, the founder and director of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics In Sport, and president and CEO of the National Consortium for Academics and Sport (NCAS). The event takes place from noon to 1:15 pm at the Humphrey Forum in the Humphrey School of Public Affairs on the U of M West Bank Campus, with the panel follows Lapchick’s lecture, “Sport as a Catalyst for Racial Progress & Gender Equity.” Both are sponsored by the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance (CSPG). With introductions by Dr. Larry Jacobs, the Walter F. and Joan Mondale Chair for Political Studies, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs and professor in the Department of Political Science, and moderated by Dr. Doug Hartmann, professor and chair of the Department of Sociology, Kane will be joined on the panel by Lapchick and Dr. Leo Lewis, School of Kinesiology alumni and Sport Management program adjunct professor. Registration requested; the event is open to the public.

Bleacher Report quotes LaVoi on impact of UConn basketball success

Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. is quoted in a BleacherReport.com article, “UConn Bad for Women’s Basketball? Not by a Long Shot.” LaVoi contends that the prevalent cultural narrative regarding sport is dominated by narrow media viewpoints that fail to take into account a broad enough spectrum of perspectives.

Barr-Anderson delivers seminar presentation to UW-Madison’s Department of Kinesiology

On March 9, Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented “Halting the Obesity Trajectory: Family-based Interventions for African-American Females” to the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

WCCO/CBS MN interviews LaVoi on coaches report card

WCCO/CBS Minnesota has interviewed Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. for the article, “The Report Card: Why Aren’t More Women Coaching Women?” LaVoi talks about the women coaches report card grading, and notes the U of M is only one hire away from an “A” grade.

Spokesman-Recorder on LaVoi’s new hiring report

The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder News Online (MSR) has released an article, “New reports show little progress in college sport race, gender hiring,” featuring the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport’s recently released report, “Head coaches of women’s collegiate teams: A report on seven select NCAA Division-I conferences, 2017-18” authored by Tucker Center co-director and senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. MSR reporter Charles Hallman quotes LaVoi on the very slight rise in hiring of women head coaches of women’s teams, saying “It’s better than going in reverse.” The article also features The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) report, “Racial and Gender Report Card,” authored by Dr. Richard Lapchick (College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida).

Ozy.com profile of US Hockey’s Hilary Knight quotes Tucker Center’s Kane

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an Ozy.com profile of US Olympic Hockey star Hilary Knight, “Team USA’s Hockey Star Has A Higher Goal: Equal Pay.” Kane says “the team’s ability to convert frustration into actionable progress has major historical significance.”

Kane podcast on WiSP Sports: “Limited sport coverage for female athletes”

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is featured in a WiSP Sports “Talking Point” podcast discussing how sport can be a site of resistance and empowerment for women. The podcast and transcript, “How Women’s Status in Sport is Contained by Men,” is a discussion of Kane’s “perspectives on why women’s sports coverage is so limited and why the focus on women’s athletes tends towards sexual objectification instead of their physical and athletic capacities.” WiSP Sports Radio is the world’s largest podcast network for women’s sport featuring more than 760 episodes and 30 unique shows with a global reach of 1.6 million.

 

credit – A WiSP Sports Production

KARE-11 features Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report in story on National Girls and Women in Sports Day

KARE 11 TV gave a nod to the Tucker Center’s  2017- 18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences in their story related to the National Girls and Women in Sports Day celebration on February 7. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, was interviewed for the story and said the report “hopefully stimulates dialogue, raises awareness, helps to recruit and retain more women in the coaching profession, and holds decision-makers who hire coaches more accountable.”

Weiss receives Legacy Award by Girls on the Run International

From the left: Liz Kunz (CEO of GOTRI), Maureen R. Weiss, Allie Riley (Senior VP of Evaluation and Programming)

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was recognized with the Legacy Award, the highest honor given by Girls on the Run International at its annual Summit in Austin, TX, in January. Girls on the Run is a 501(c)(3) organization and physical activity-based positive youth development (PA-PYD) program designed to enhance girls’ social, psychological, and physical skills and behaviors to successfully navigate life experiences. The program uses running and other physical activities as a platform for teaching life skills and promoting holistic health outcomes for girls in grades 3-8. The organization’s reach is national—in all 50 states with over 200 local community councils, 50,000 volunteer coaches, and over 1.5 million girls served since inception. The organization is committed to diversity—serving girls from all walks of life and backgrounds. Nearly 50% of girls receive subsidized registration fees to enable them to attain the psychosocial and behavioral benefits of participating in each season’s 10-week program.

Weiss’ Legacy Award was based on eight years and hundreds of hours devoted to serving this non-profit organization—as a board member, consultant, speaker, and contributor to curricular development and effective coach delivery—as well as conducting an independent longitudinal evaluation study that demonstrated strong and lasting positive impact of program participation on girls’ life skills learning and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes—confidence, competence, connection, caring, character, and contribution to community and society. The study received widespread attention in a press release last August and Weiss presented the study results at the Summit meeting in a presentation titled, “How and Why Girls on the Run is an Exemplary Positive Youth Development Program.”

 

Joey Kronzer to serve as volunteer assistant tennis coach for Hamline University

Joey Kronzer, a current Kinesiology master’s student with an emphasis in sport and exercise psychology, and a member of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, has been named the Volunteer Assistant Coach of the Hamline University Men’s and Women’s Tennis Teams. The complete announcement is available here.

Kronzer is advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, professor in the School of Kinesiology.

Tucker Center releases 2017-18 NCAA Division-I Women Coaches Report

The Tucker Center, in collaboration with the Alliance of Women Coaches, is proud to announce the release of the 2017-18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences report and infographic. 40+ years after the passage of Title IX, female sport participation is at an all-time high but the percentage of women coaching women at the collegiate level is stagnant. While the number of collegiate coaching opportunities is also at a record high, only 20% of all college coaching positions for men’s and women’s teams are filled by women. One goal of this report is to change that trend. View the report and infographic here…

Strib quotes LaVoi on NFL fan behavior

portrait image of Nicole M. LaVoiIn an article, “Can Philly fans change their image? Yes, but only if they want to,” the Star Tribune quotes Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center. LaVoi and others talk about the hows and whys of fan behavior, with some thoughts about what could happen at this year’s Superbowl.