CEHD News Kinesiology

CEHD News Kinesiology

Dengel and colleagues publish in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and colleagues have published in the online publication, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

The article, “Association between carotid intimates media thickness, age, and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents,” describes their study to determine the relations of measures of carotid intima media thickness with body mass index and cardiovascular risk score in children. The study concluded that maintaining normal levels of adiposity and other risk variables may be useful in preventing early changes associated with preclinical atherosclerosis.

 

Stoffregen publishes in newest Kinesiology Review issue

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory,  published in a recent issues of Kinesiology Review. In his article titled “Ecological Physics and the Perceptual Information That Supports Motor Control,” he discusses the nature of perceptual information and implications for kinesiology.

Kinesiology Review is the official publication of the National Academy of Kinesiology (NAK) and the American Kinesiology Association (AKA).

 

Ozy.com profile of US Hockey’s Hilary Knight quotes Tucker Center’s Kane

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an Ozy.com profile of US Olympic Hockey star Hilary Knight, “Team USA’s Hockey Star Has A Higher Goal: Equal Pay.” Kane says “the team’s ability to convert frustration into actionable progress has major historical significance.”

Kane podcast on WiSP Sports: “Limited sport coverage for female athletes”

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is featured in a WiSP Sports “Talking Point” podcast discussing how sport can be a site of resistance and empowerment for women. The podcast and transcript, “How Women’s Status in Sport is Contained by Men,” is a discussion of Kane’s “perspectives on why women’s sports coverage is so limited and why the focus on women’s athletes tends towards sexual objectification instead of their physical and athletic capacities.” WiSP Sports Radio is the world’s largest podcast network for women’s sport featuring more than 760 episodes and 30 unique shows with a global reach of 1.6 million.

 

credit – A WiSP Sports Production

Former LIHP graduate student is author of recently published paper


Joe Ostrem, Ph.D., a 2016 graduate from the School of Kinesiology and former member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of an article recently published in the journal, Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. The article, entitled “Intra- and Interday reproducibility of high-flow-mediated constriction response in young adults” examined the reproducibility of a method to measure vascular health. The results of this study indicate high-flow-mediated constriction is reproducible in young adults and should be included to assess vascular health. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the LIHP in the School of Kinesiology, Ostrem’s adviser, is a co-author on this article, as well as current lab members Nick Evanoff and Justin Ryder.

Joe Ostrem, Ph.D.
Dr. Don Dengel
Donald Dengel, Ph.D.

Wiese-Bjornstal quoted in corporate publication 3M Particles

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, is quoted in the article, “Don’t let your injury get the best of you: The role of mental fitness in rehabilitation,” by Janna Fischer. It appears in the online corporate publication, 3M Particles, which features stories about science applied to life. The article discusses the mental challenges of returning from sport- and exercise-related injuries.

HSC lab publishes first study in 2018 on abnormal muscle activity in horses with shivers disease

In an interdisciplinary collaboration with partners in veterinary medicine at the University of Minnesota and the Michigan State University, researchers in the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory examined horses with shivers disease.

An earlier study identified the previously unknown neuropathology of the disease – a degeneration of neurons in the cerebellum. Because the cerebellum is involved in coordinating the control of muscles during movement, the researchers wanted to find out how the loss of cerebellar function affects the muscle recruitment in these horses. Like humans, horses activate more muscle fibers if they want to run faster. However, these horses recruited more muscles and more muscle fibers than necessary, which led to a loss of movement coordination and problems in their balance.

The results of this study, “Abnormal locomotor muscle recruitment activity is present in horses with shivering and Purkinje cell distal axonopathy,” are published in a paper that appears in Equine Veterinary Journal. Joshua Aman, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral researcher in the lab, is the first author of the paper. Other co-authors are current lab member Naveen Elangovan, Ph.D., and Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D.professor in the School of Kinesiology.

 

 

Dengel presents at University of Utah

Dr. Don DengelDonald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Utah in the Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation on February 5. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “Measuring Vascular Function: From Peripheral to Cerebral.”

Barr-Anderson presents at Minne-College in Arizona

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented at Minne-College in Arizona held in Scottsdale, AZ, on February 10. The title of her presentation was “Move More to Weigh Less: The Importance of Physical Activity to Address Childhood Obesity.” Also attending were CEHD Dean Jean Quam, Serena Wright, CEHD Sr. Alumni Director, and a number of U of M alumni. Minne-College in Arizona is sponsored by the U of M Alumni Association.

Konczak gives talk to U of M ataxia group colloquium

Juergen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, gave a lecture on “Somatosensory training to overcome motor dysfunction in dystonia and Parkinson’s disease” to the University of Minnesota ataxia research group. The ataxia group is an interdisciplinary group of basic science and clinical researchers interested in understanding the neuropathology of ataxia and its treatment. Dr. Konczak spoke about how a sensory-based rehabilitation training can improve motor function in focal dystonia and Parkinson’s disease.

KARE-11 features Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report in story on National Girls and Women in Sports Day

KARE 11 TV gave a nod to the Tucker Center’s  2017- 18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences in their story related to the National Girls and Women in Sports Day celebration on February 7. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, was interviewed for the story and said the report “hopefully stimulates dialogue, raises awareness, helps to recruit and retain more women in the coaching profession, and holds decision-makers who hire coaches more accountable.”

Dengel shares insight on impact of Olympic Games

With the XXIII Olympic Winter Games opening in Pyeongchang County, South Korea on February 8, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is quoted on the U of M homepage on the long-term impact the Olympic Games can have on host countries. Read the feature here.

During winter break, Dengel led a course in London, England, about the impact of the 1908, 1948 and 2012 Olympics on the city, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and on sport. He also taught Sport and Politics Collide: 1936 & 1972 German Olympics.

Weiss receives Legacy Award by Girls on the Run International

From the left: Liz Kunz (CEO of GOTRI), Maureen R. Weiss, Allie Riley (Senior VP of Evaluation and Programming)

Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, was recognized with the Legacy Award, the highest honor given by Girls on the Run International at its annual Summit in Austin, TX, in January. Girls on the Run is a 501(c)(3) organization and physical activity-based positive youth development (PA-PYD) program designed to enhance girls’ social, psychological, and physical skills and behaviors to successfully navigate life experiences. The program uses running and other physical activities as a platform for teaching life skills and promoting holistic health outcomes for girls in grades 3-8. The organization’s reach is national—in all 50 states with over 200 local community councils, 50,000 volunteer coaches, and over 1.5 million girls served since inception. The organization is committed to diversity—serving girls from all walks of life and backgrounds. Nearly 50% of girls receive subsidized registration fees to enable them to attain the psychosocial and behavioral benefits of participating in each season’s 10-week program.

Weiss’ Legacy Award was based on eight years and hundreds of hours devoted to serving this non-profit organization—as a board member, consultant, speaker, and contributor to curricular development and effective coach delivery—as well as conducting an independent longitudinal evaluation study that demonstrated strong and lasting positive impact of program participation on girls’ life skills learning and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes—confidence, competence, connection, caring, character, and contribution to community and society. The study received widespread attention in a press release last August and Weiss presented the study results at the Summit meeting in a presentation titled, “How and Why Girls on the Run is an Exemplary Positive Youth Development Program.”

 

Joey Kronzer to serve as volunteer assistant tennis coach for Hamline University

Joey Kronzer, a current Kinesiology master’s student with an emphasis in sport and exercise psychology, and a member of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, has been named the Volunteer Assistant Coach of the Hamline University Men’s and Women’s Tennis Teams. The complete announcement is available here.

Kronzer is advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, professor in the School of Kinesiology.

Tucker Center releases 2017-18 NCAA Division-I Women Coaches Report

The Tucker Center, in collaboration with the Alliance of Women Coaches, is proud to announce the release of the 2017-18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences report and infographic. 40+ years after the passage of Title IX, female sport participation is at an all-time high but the percentage of women coaching women at the collegiate level is stagnant. While the number of collegiate coaching opportunities is also at a record high, only 20% of all college coaching positions for men’s and women’s teams are filled by women. One goal of this report is to change that trend. View the report and infographic here…

Lewis is co-author of article on fall prevention and physical activity resources for older adults

LewisBeth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director of the School of Kinesiology,  is a co-author with U of M colleagues from the School of Nursing, the School of Public Health, and the Department of Psychology, an article in The Gerontologist. “Older Adults’ Utilization of Community Resources Targeting Fall Prevention and Physical Activity”  discusses the effects of older adults knowing about and using local community resources to improve their level of physical activity, which is related to fall prevention in older adults. The study shows that the effects are only short-term and suggests research to identify future strategies.

Leon co-author on Alzheimer’s study

Art Leon, M.D., professor of exercise physiology in the School of Kinesiology, is a co-author of a study recently published in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias. The article is titled “Determination of Aerobic Capacity via Cycle Ergometer Exercise Testing in Alzheimer’s Disease.” The study investigated older adults with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) to determine individualized aerobic capacity and ability to perform treadmill testing due to balance or gait issues.

First author of the publication is Leon’s former doctoral student Ulf G. Bronas, Ph.D., ATC, associate professor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

 

Strib quotes LaVoi on NFL fan behavior

portrait image of Nicole M. LaVoiIn an article, “Can Philly fans change their image? Yes, but only if they want to,” the Star Tribune quotes Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center. LaVoi and others talk about the hows and whys of fan behavior, with some thoughts about what could happen at this year’s Superbowl.

LaVoi to keynote at first-ever WISTCA women4women event

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, will be the opening keynote for the first-ever women4women event held in conjunction with the 29th Annual Wisconsin Track Coaches Association (WISTCA) Conference held in Madison, WI, February 1-3, 2018. LaVoi’s talk is titled, “Educate.Stimulate.Advocate: Thriving in the Coaching Profession,” and will offer strategies for women coaches as well has how male allies can help.