CEHD News Kinesiology

CEHD News Kinesiology

Kane, LaVoi publish on intercollegiate athletic director viewpoints on female coaches

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, and  Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer, have published an article in the Women in Sport and Physical Activity Journal. “An Examination of Intercollegiate Athletic Directors’ Attributions Regarding the Underrepresentation of Female Coaches in Women’s Sports” surveyed a nationwide sample of college athletic administrators to determine current-day perceptions regarding the underrepresentation of female head coaches with significant gender differences emerging.

 

Gao named to editorial board of Journal of Sport and Health Science

Zan Gao, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology associate professor and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), was recently appointed Editorial Board member by the Journal of Sport and Health Science (JSHS). JSHS is an international peer-reviewed journal founded by the Shanghai University of Sport, and co-published by Elsevier Publishing Group. JSHS is dedicated to the advancement of sport/exercise/health sciences including sport medicine, sport and exercise physiology, public health promotion, biomechanics, sport and exercise biochemistry and nutrition, sport and exercise psychology, motor behavior, coaching, physical education, traditional Chinese sports and wellbeing, and growth and maturation. JSHS has a current impact factor at 2.531.

LaVoi to serve three-year term on Faculty Senate

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport was chosen to serve as representative to the University Faculty Senate for a three-year term beginning July 1, 2018.  

The Faculty Senate at the University of Minnesota is comprised of faculty and faculty-like academic professional representatives from the all University of Minnesota campuses and concerns itself with faculty welfare, educational, and research matters.

 

Barr-Anderson featured on School of Public Health and ASPPH websites

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, is featured on the websites of the School of Public Health and the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health.

Her research project, “Physical activity and sociodemographic correlates of adolescent exergamers,” was recently published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. The study was a collaboration between the School of Public Health’s program Project EAT and Barr-Anderson, and revealed that exergaming may have an influence on physical activity for girls. Barr-Anderson said the positive relationship between girls who are vigorously active and those who play exergames shows that gaming may play a role in increasing vigorous activity or help lead to such activity.

 

Inoue publishes on sporting event attendance and health

Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., associate professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, has published a multi-year study with two colleagues examining the extent to which sporting event attendance is associated with self-rated health in Global Health Research and Policy.

“Association between sporting event attendance and self-rated health: an analysis of multiyear cross-sectional national data in Japan” draws from an economic model of health production and psychological research on the health benefits of psychosocial resources in which sporting event attendance was hypothesized to have a positive relationship with self-rated health.

The results of the study demonstrate that, controlling for the effects of personal and environmental characteristics, sporting event attendance positively correlates with self-rated health over a 12-year period. Specifically, when compared to individuals who did not attend any sporting event during the past year, those who attended a sporting event were 33% more likely to indicate a higher level of self-rated health. These findings provide evidence for a positive association between sport spectatorship and the perception of general health and contribute to the literature examining the relationship between sport spectatorship and health outcomes.

 

Gao and colleagues publish study on effect of preschoolers’ physical activity in BioMed Research International

Dr. Zan Gao

Zan Gao, Ph.D., School of Kinesiology associate professor, has published an article with colleagues in BioMedResearch International. The study, “Effect of Mini-Trampoline Physical Activity on Executive Functions in Preschool Children,” investigated the effect of mini-trampoline physical activity on the development of executive functions in Chinese preschool children. A sample of 57 children aged 3–5 enrolled in preschool was randomly assigned to an intervention group and control group for 10 weeks. All children had the same classes and care service, but children in the intervention group had an extra 20 minutes of trampoline training after school.

Findings indicated that a 10-week trampoline physical activity training may not be sufficient to trigger the improvement of preschool children’s executive functions, and future research with larger representative samples is warranted to discern the dose-response evidence in enhancing young children’s executive functions through physical activity.

BioMed Research International is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal with a current Impact Factor of 2.476.

Barr-Anderson publishes with colleagues in two journals

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, has published a manuscript with colleagues titled “Worksite physical activity breaks: perspectives on feasibility of implementation” in Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation. The first author, Dr. Carolyn Bramante, completed this study as a part of her MPH/PhD program, and Barr-Anderson served as Dr. Bramante’s MPH thesis adviser.

In addition, Barr-Anderson, along with colleagues from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, has published an article titled “Effect of a culturally-tailored mother-daughter physical activity intervention on pre-adolescent African-American girls’ physical activity levels” in Preventive Medicine Reports. The results determined that this pilot study was an important first step in designing culturally-tailored interventions to impact the physical activity of pre-adolescent African-American girls that includes the direct involvement of the girls’ mothers.

 

 

Konczak receives Marty and Jack Rossmann Faculty Development Award

Congratulations to Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, who received the Marty and Jack Rossmann Faculty Development Award at the College of Education and Human Development assembly on April 30. The Rossmann Award recognizes a tenured faculty member who has demonstrated a truly exceptional level of creativity and productivity in scholarship, teaching and service, and who shows great promise of continuing such achievement. Konzak has instituted and directs the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL) as well as the Center for Clinical Movement Science (CCMS), an interdisciplinary unit across the University. His research, currently supported by grants from NIH and the NSF, focuses on the study of neurological movement disorders, motor learning after brain injury, and motor development in infancy and childhood and collaborates with, among others, the School of Nursing, School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Engineering as well as with international research centers, primarily in Italy and Singapore. Since joining the faculty in 1999 he has served in leading roles on several Graduate School and College committees and has been the Director of Graduate Studies for the School.

Barr-Anderson presents at Board of Regents’ May meeting

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, has been invited to give a presentation at the Board of Regents’ May meeting. She is one of four newly promoted University of Minnesota faculty members invited to the meeting to give a short presentation and answer questions about their work.

Each year at their May meeting, the Board of Regents invite several recently promoted faculty from across the University who represent excellence in a variety of ways to participate in a panel. Barr-Anderson will discuss her scholarship and creative activities related to her research and community involvement.

Tianou Zhang accepts tenure-track position at UTSA

Tianou Zhang, doctoral candidate in School of Kinesiology, has accepted a tenure-track position at the University of Texas-San Antonio (UTSA). Zhang will be an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Nutrition beginning this August. He will teach courses in Exercise and Nutrition, and continue his research on beneficial effects of phytochemicals supplementation in exercise and health. 

Zhang is advised by Li Li Ji, Ph.D., professor in the School and director of the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene & Exercise Science (LPHES).

Zeng, Gao and Lee publish in Journal of Clinical Medicine


School of Kinesiology Ph.D. student Nan Zengassociate professor Zan Gao, Ph.D., and assistant professor Jung Eun Lee, Ph.D., from the University of Minnesota Duluth, recently published an article titled “Reliability of Using Motion Sensors to Measure Children’s Physical Activity Levels in Exergaming” in Journal of Clinical Medicine. Mr. Zeng is a current advisee and Dr. Lee is a former advisee of Prof. Gao.

The study examined the reliability of two objective measurement tools in assessing children’s physical activity levels in an exergaming setting. The findings suggested that the NL-1000 pedometers and ActiGraph GT3X accelerometers have low reliability in assessing elementary school children’s physical activity levels during exergaming. More research is warranted in determining the reliable and accurate measurement information regarding the use of modern devices in exergaming setting.

Nan Zeng
Dr. Zan Gao

    

Gao establishes Brain Gym Lab at LoveWorks Academy in Golden Valley

Dr. Zan Gao

Thanks to support from the administrators of the University of Minnesota and the principal and teachers at LoveWorks Academy in Golden Valley, Zan Gao, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory (PAEL), recently established a Brain Gym Lab in the fitness room of LoveWorks Academy. Specifically, four Wii U exercise stations and four Xbox One Kinect exercise stations have been set up in the Brain Gym Lab, which promotes learning through movement.

Loveworks Academy is a public charter school located in a diverse neighborhood and works with a large number of low-income, underserved children ages 4 through 14. The school focuses on a strong academic program that personalizes learning for all students, helping develop independent, cooperative, responsible, and creative adults.

Thus far, the novel exercise program has been well received by teachers and students in the school. This is the third school-based lab Dr. Gao has established in the public schools in the state of Minnesota. Below are photos from the program.

 

Kristin Wood named recipient of Kinesiology’s 2018-19 Doctoral Dissertation Award

Congratulations to Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Kristin Wood, who has been chosen by the School’s Graduate Education Committee as recipient of the School of Kinesiology’s 2018-19 Doctoral Dissertation AwardThe award provides a 50% graduate assistantship for the coming academic year.

Wood is advised by Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the sport and exercise psychology emphasis. Her research interests are in psychology of injury, psychological interventions to increase rehabilitation adherence, and curriculum development in athletic training education programs. She has the following publication due out in June, 2018: Wiese-Bjornstal, D. M., White, A. C., Wood, K. N., & Russell, H. C., Sports medicine psychology. In T. S. Horn & A. L. Smith (Eds.), Advances in sport and exercise psychology (4th ed.) Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics

The Kinesiology Doctoral Dissertation Award provides the School’s most accomplished Ph.D candidates with an opportunity to devote efforts to an outstanding research project under the mentorship of the student’s primary faculty advisor. 

Kinesiology PhD Madeleine Orr receives graduate award from WPLC

Kinesiology Ph.D. candidate Madeleine Orr has been selected to receive a $2,100 graduate student award from the Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle (WPLC). Orr is in the Sport Management emphasis and is advised by Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D.

The award will be presented at the WPLC’s annual awards celebration on Tuesday, June 12, at the Town and Country Club. Orr was chosen to receive the award based on her “academic achievements, community involvement, leadership, and passion for your academic and professional career.”

The Women’s Philanthropic Leadership Circle was designed to increase the overall visibility of women leaders in education and human development and provide financial support to women in and aspiring to leadership positions. Each year, WPLC grants financial awards to women graduate students and “Rising Star” pre-tenure faculty members who are demonstrating leadership and creativity through their academics, research, service, and/or teaching.

 

Barr-Anderson, Konczak, Nielsen receive CEHD awards

Award recipients Nielsen, Konczak, Barr-Anderson (left to right)
Nielsen, Konczak, Barr-Anderson (left to right)

At the 2018 CEHD Spring Assembly on April 30, three outstanding members of the School of Kinesiology, received College awards. Congratulations to Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., and Carol Nielsen.

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology, was honored with the Multicultural Recognition Award for Faculty. This award recognizes significant professional or extracurricular contributions to and promotion of multicultural relations and perspectives. Barr-Anderson’s research centers on increasing physical activity behavior and decreasing sedentary behavior among children, particularly African-American females. Her professionally and personally involvement in the community fuel her passion. These services, such as volunteering for two African-American female organizations committed to the empowerment and education of our youth, Barr-Anderson states, have influenced her research and most importantly allow her to use her privilege as an African-American academic researcher to share the voices from her community.

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, received the Marty and Jack Rossmann Faculty Development Award. The Rossmann Award recognizes a tenured faculty member who has demonstrated a truly exceptional level of creativity and productivity in scholarship, teaching and service, and who shows great promise of continuing such achievement. Konzak has instituted and directs the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL) as well as the Center for Clinical Movement Science (CCMS), an interdisciplinary unit across the University. His research, currently supported by grants from NIH and the NSF, focuses on the study of neurological movement disorders, motor learning after brain injury, and motor development in infancy and childhood and collaborates with, among others, the School of Nursing, School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Engineering as well as with international research centers, primarily in Italy and Singapore. Since joining the faculty in 1999 he has served in leading roles on several Graduate School and College committees and has been the Director of Graduate Studies for the School.

Carol Nielsen is the recipient of the Jeanne T. Lupton Civil Service/Bargaining Unit Outstanding Service Award. Named in honor of Jeanne T. Lupton, Dean of General College (1979-86), this award recognizes outstanding service to CEHD and to the University of Minnesota by a CEHD Civil Service/Bargaining Unit staff. Although Nielsen’s primary responsibilities focus on all aspects of course management, she also has been heavily involved in building management and securing a safe workplace for others. She has built an excellent relationship with Facilities Management (FM) and takes a proactive approach to find solutions that are financially in our best interests. Nielsen is a passionate advocate for students and works directly with advisors and instructors to ensure high 4-year graduation rates in the School. What truly sets her apart, however, is Carol’s positive impact on her staff and colleagues. Her kindness, consideration, and inspired leadership style makes people feel welcome and appreciated, causing very high morale and productivity among the department staff.

Congratulations to all!

 

CEHD Scholarship Donor & Recipient Luncheon held April 20

The College of Education and Human Development hosted a college-wide scholarship donor and recipient luncheon, the annual “CEHD Celebration of Scholars,” on April 20 at McNamara Alumni Center that included several of the School of Kinesiology‘s own. At the event, alumni and friends met and learned more about CEHD and the student award recipients and offered thanks to the donors.

Pictured below (left to right) are: philanthropists MaryJo and Guy Smith; Caroline Heffernan, 2016-17 recipient of the Pam Borton Endowment for the Promotion of Girls and Women in Sport Leadership; Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., Professor and Tucker Center Director; Beth Lewis, Ph.D., Professor and School of Kinesiology Director.

image of five people standing close together and smiling: MaryJo and Guy Smith, Caroline Heffernan, Mary Jo Kane, Beth Lewis

Pictured below (left to right) are: Steven J. Lipovetsky, 2017-18 recipient of the Edith Mueller Park & Recreation Memorial Award; Dr. Mike Mueller, mother of Edie Mueller and, with her late husband Dr. Van Mueller, originator of the Edith Mueller Park & Recreation Memorial Award and the Edith Mueller Endowed Fund for Graduate Education in the Tucker Center; Hailee Moehnke and Kristin Wood, 2017-18 recipients of the Edith Mueller Endowed Fund for Graduate Education in the Tucker Center.

image of four people standing close together facing the camera and smiling: Steven Lipovetsky, Dr. Mike Mueller, Hailee Moehnke, Kristin Wood

Barr-Anderson publishes in Journal of Adolescent Health

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory, published along with colleagues from the School of Public Health a manuscript brief in the Journal of Adolescent Health (impact factor of 3.612).

The publication titled “Physical Activity and Sociodemographic Correlates of Adolescent Exergamers” examines demographic and behavioral characteristics of adolescents who engage in active video games, or exergamers.

 

 

Seven School of Kinesiology classes make “15 best UMN classes” list from the Odyssey

In the article, “The 15 Best UMN Classes You Didn’t Know Existed,” published in The Odyssey Online,  seven classes offered by the School of Kinesiology are highlighted. The courses mentioned are a part of Recreation Administration and the Physical Activity Program.

Three Recreation Administration course take first place: REC 2151 Outdoor and Camp Leadership (recognized for its unique class structure and trip to the Apostle Islands in Northern Wisconsin), REC 3322 Outdoor Recreation Winter Skills, REC 3321 Outdoor Recreation 3-Season Skills, and REC 4311 Programming for Outdoor and Environmental Education. PE 1205 Scuba and Skin Diving takes second, and PE 1033 Foil Fencing took third. REC 4301 Wilderness and Adventure Education in Belize ranks in as ninth on the list.

Kinesiology’s adviser nominated U of M advisory board co-chair

School of Kinesiology adviser Katie Koopmeiners has been nominated the co-chair of the U of M’s Academic Advisory Network (AAN) board for the 2018-19 academic year. The AAN fosters opportunities for professional growth, personal development, and community building for advisors and student services professionals from across the Twin Cities campus. It also provides a forum for discussion and the exchange of ideas and information regarding academic advising within the University community.

Koopmeiners advises undergraduate major students in recreation education and sport management, as well as minor students in coaching, health & wellness promotion, outdoor & recreation education, and sport management.

Kristin Farrell, the School’s honors program academic adviser, will be a member on the AAN board during the 2018-19 academic year.

Grad student Michelle Harbin lead author of research publication


Michelle Harbin, M.S. and doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology and member of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of a peer-reviewed article, entitled “Associations of sex, age and adiposity in endothelium-independent dilation in children“. The article is published in the journal Physiological Measurement and examines the association of age, sex and obesity on vascular smooth muscle function. It was observed that vascular smooth muscle function was significantly lower in male children and adolescents suggesting that impaired vascular smooth muscle function and increased cardiovascular disease risk among males may begin in childhood.

Co-authors of this publication in the School of Kinesiology are Hanan Zavala, a current graduate student and Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor and LIHP director.

Michelle Harbin
Hanan Zavala
Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D.