CEHD News Students

CEHD News Students

Q&A with Hannah Boldt, CSPP student

Hannah Boldt head shot
Hannah Boldt

Hannah Boldt didn’t always know she wanted to be a counselor. Initially, she pursued a degree as a saxaphone player. She switched her major to international studies with the intention of working in international aid in West Africa, however upon graduation found a career in the software and I.T. sector where she worked for four years. Now a second year counseling and student personnel psychology (CSPP) student, Hannah is excited to finally be on her path to become a counselor or therapist.

She says it was her own winding road to find her passion that drew her to the field of career counseling and personal therapy.

“I want to normalize the student experience of not knowing what to do, or graduating in something and not using it,” Hannah says.

We sat down with Hannah and asked her a few questions about her experience as a CSPP student and what insights she’d like to share with other prospective students. Here’s what she said:

What surprised you along the way?

“I was surprised at the amount of emotional energy it takes to be a counselor. I knew what I was getting into, but my expectations weren’t prepared for the amount of personal reflection and growth I would be doing. Overall, I’ve experienced a lot of emotional growth.”

What’s something you’ve most enjoyed about your experience?

“I was ready to be back in school and learning, after taking 4 years off in between my undergrad and master’s. I came in with the expectation to be a sponge and take in everything. It’s been so exciting and exhilarating to learn more about the field of psychology and counseling.”

How would you describe the student experience and what does that mean to you?

“In CEHD as a whole, I’ve been impressed with the opportunities for engagement. Every day, there’s a different talk or seminar going on and it feels like there’s a spirit of engagement and learning. Sometimes I think I signed up for a little too much. I’m working three jobs and go to school full time.”

How have your professors helped you along the way?

“All three of my professors in the CSPP program have gone above and beyond their role. It seems like they take a vested interest in my growth as an individual and professional. I work with Dr. Ohrtman doing clinical placements and she is communicative and dedicated to connecting, networking, and helping me professionally. My adviser, Dr. Howard, helped me with the emotional journey transitioning from work and adjusting to a graduate program. She also suggested that my practicum be with Student Counseling Services, which has challenged me to grow outside my comfort zone. Lastly, Dr. Berger has been always accessible and an excellent advocate to better the program.”

What would you like prospective students to know?

“Grad school is tough. Also, it’s incredibly worthwhile. I’ve been challenged to grow as a person and define my values and what I stand for. In the counseling program, I appreciate the advocacy element. It’s not just having these values, but the responsibility to take action. You have to be prepared to do emotional work and self reflection. As a result, you will grow as an individual and come into your own.”

How has your cohort helped you along the way?

“My cohort has been so helpful and important to me. There’s 35 of us, but we have a strong bond because we are all going through the process of discovering ourselves and the profession together. We all came in with different experiences, and it’s helpful to have people to lean on when things get tough and to normalize the experience.”

What are you looking forward to with graduation?

“Having a job that I look forward to going to and getting paid for something I love doing, is what I’m most excited for. I’m ready to use what I’ve learned and put it into practice. It’s great to feel like I’ve arrived at what feels like my ‘calling’ after 27 years of wondering what I was meant to do as a professional.”

This post was originally written by Ciara Metzger.

 

Kinesiology’s Morgan Betker nominated for Midwest Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) Excellence in Teaching Award

Morgan Betker

Morgan Betker, Ph.D. student in the School of Kinesiology, was nominated by the U of M Graduate School for the prestigious Midwest Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) Excellence in Teaching Award. As the only doctoral student nominated, Betker will represent the U of M at MAGS’ 2018 regional competition. The award will be presented at the MAGS 74rd Annual Meeting, April 4-6, 2018, in Grand Rapids, MI.

MAGS Excellence in Teaching Award recognizes and encourages graduate students for future service as college and university faculty. It supports the Council of Graduate Schools’ (CGS) efforts to promote Preparing Future Faculty to meet needs in academia.

Betker is pursuing her Ph.D. in Kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise physiology, advised by Dr. Beth Lewis.

 

 

Grad students present interdisciplinary research ideas in KIN 8980

For their final project, students in KIN 8980 – Graduate Research Seminar in Kinesiology presented ideas for research projects “that bridge” across different School of Kinesiology emphasis areas.

KIN 8980 is required for all M.S./M.A. and Ph.D. students, and covers topics such as responsible conduct of research and proposal design. Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of Sport Management in the School, taught the course this fall.

During the semester, students discussed the wide spectrum of faculty and student research activities across the department. They then were divided into teams to design potential interdisciplinary research projects to present to the class, and face critical questions from their audience.

Here are the presentations (YouTube playlist):

 

 

Graduate School announces Kinesiology Ph.D. Madeline Orr winner of University-wide 3MT® Competition

Madeleine Orr accepts her prize with School of Kinesiology supporters. From left, Nina Wang, graduate student coordinator; Dr. Michael Wade , DGS; Dr. Beth Lewis, director of the School of Kinesiology; Orr; and Dr. Yuhei Inoue, Orr’s adviser.

Congratulations to Madeleine Orr, Kinesiology Ph.D. student in the Sport Management emphasis,  who won the Second Annual University-wide 3MT® Competition held December 1. The competition, sponsored by the Graduate School, featured finalists from collegiate- and campus-level competitions. Orr will represent the University of Minnesota at the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) 3-Minute Thesis competition in Spring 2018. She also was awarded a $500 prize.

The competition was covered by the Star Tribune in the December 18 Variety section.

The 3-Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition that challenges students to communicate the significance of their projects without the use of props or industry jargon, in just three minutes. The exercise is designed to develop academic, presentation, and research communication skills along with the ability to quickly explain research in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

Orr’s presentation is titled “The Rhetoric vs. the Reality of Sport Event Legacies.” She placed first in CEHD’s 3MT® Competition last spring. She is advised by sport management assistant professor Yuhei Inoue.

 

Panel discussion on challenges, future landscape of Twin Cities sports industry featured in Minneapolis Spokesman-Review

A November 8 panel discussion at TCF Bank Stadium, “Challenges and Future Landscape of the Twin Cities Sports Industry,” was covered by the Minneapolis Spokesman-Review. Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and co-coordinator of the event, was quoted, along with representatives from local sports teams.

Their comments and concerns ranged from how the availability of big data drives the decision-making process to how social media has made information on players and teams available to fans instantly, making games “live events.” With six professional teams in the metropolitan area, the competition for attracting fans can be challenging. The Spokesman-Review reporter asked the panelists about efforts to increase fan diversity.  All pointed to efforts to improve outreach, but “there’s room for growth” said Bryan Donaldson, Minnesota Twins Senior Community Relations director.

 

New Health and Wellness Promotion minor to be offered next spring

The School of Kinesiology is offering a new all-University undergraduate minor in Health and Wellness Promotion starting in Spring 2018. Students will study the effects of physical activity and recreation in terms of community, individual health and overall wellness. Focusing on the health, physical activity, and nutrition in the context of society, they will learn how to create and utilize programs that promote physical activity, leisure and wellness. The minor will prepare students for a variety of career paths in allied health, industry, business, teaching, and community service. 

“We are very excited to offer the new Health and Wellness Promotion Minor.  There is increased attention on promoting health and wellness as a strategy to prevent chronic disease, and our hope is that this minor will help undergraduates gain a stronger understanding of how physical activity, recreation, wellness, and nutrition can be promoted in their professional career.”  

Beth Lewis, Ph.D., professor and director in the School of Kinesiology

This interdisciplinary minor is a campus-wide program, open to all undergraduate students regardless of college or major. Detailed program information and how to apply can be found on the Health and Wellness Promotion minor’s webpage.

LaVoi to speak at Gustavus Adolphus on Nov. 13

Gustavus Adolphus College alumna and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., will speak at her alma mater on Monday, November 13, on “Current Research on Girls and Women in Sport.” Her presentation will be held in Nobel Hall 201 at 5:30 p.m. Lavoi is also co-director of the School’s Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport.

Kinesiology undergraduate Elisheva Savvateev receives UROP award

Elisheva Savvateev, an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL), has received a U of M Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award. Thomas Stoffregen, Ph. D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, supervises her project, “The driver passenger effect in head mounted virtual reality.” Continue reading “Kinesiology undergraduate Elisheva Savvateev receives UROP award”

2017-18 China Champions arrive at the U of M for a year of study and cultural experiences

Left to right: Fei Xie 谢菲 (Rhythmic Gymnastics), ShuJiao Jin 金淑娇 (Judo),  Wen Tong 佟文 (Judo), YiLin Yang 杨伊琳 (Gymnastics), and YaFei Chu 禇亚飞 (Race Walking)

The School of Kinesiology and the University of Minnesota welcome this year’s China Champions, the fourth cohort of world-class athletes from China traveling to the U.S. to experience a year of study at the University of Minnesota.

This year’s students include a gymnast, two judokas, a race walker, and a rhythmic gymnast. The athletes won championships spanning national, international and Olympic competitions. Most of the athletes have completed their competitive careers and now work in the China Sport Administration or are coaches.

During the year, the China Champions will attend specially designed courses in the School of Kinesiology, including academic seminars, workshops, and classes in English as a Learned Language. Athletes will also visit Minnesota cultural sites and become familiar with the Twin Cities. The China Champions are available to visit classes around the U and share their personal experiences in training and achieving elite world championship status in their sport.

“The China Champions Program has been a truly wonderful partnership between University of Minnesota and Beijing Sport University,” says Jean Quam, dean of the College of Education and Human Development. “With each year, the program strengthens our international relationships and the University’s global visibility and collaboration.”

The University of Minnesota hosts the annual China Champions Program (CCP) to foster an exchange of culture, education and sport. Led by the School of Kinesiology in collaboration with Beijing Sport University and supported by the China Scholarship Council, CCP is a unique global collaboration that provides mutual benefits for Chinese athletes and University faculty, staff and students.

Read about these China Champions accomplishments.

Inoue quoted in The Japan Times on college sports

 image of Yuhei InoueYuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an article in The Japan Times, Japan’s largest English-language newspaper.

Inoue helped to organize former U of M athletic director Joel Maturi’s visit to Japan, where Maturi talked about the pros and cons of collegiate athletics in the United States. In the article titled, “Former Minnesota athletics chief Joel Maturi says Japan can benefit from college sports overhaul,” Inoue mentions the positive role collegiate sport can have for student communities.

Koopmeiners to present at AAN’s Branding You professional development session

Katie Koopmeiners, undergraduate academic adviser for the School of Kinesiology, will be presenting at the Academic Advising Network’s first session in their professional development series, “Branding You.” The title of her presentation is “Creating an Advising Philosophy.”

Koopmeiners, who advises in the areas of Recreation Administration, Sport Management, and Coaching, will discuss the importance of an advising philosophy in a working session that will help new and seasoned advisers formalize their guiding principles in their advising practice. Participants will consider their advising style, strengths and theoretical basis to develop their own personal advising philosophy.

The session will be held Tuesday, October 24, from 10:30-noon in Nolte 140.

Mahnan featured in Global Programs and Strategy Alliance’s “Global U”

Arash Mahnan, Kinesiology Ph.D. student and IT Fellow, is one of three people featured in the Global Programs and Strategy Alliance online newsletter, Global U, promoting Driven: The University of Minnesota Campaign, the first system-wide fundraising campaign at the U of M in more than a decade. The Alliance has set a goal of raising $7 million to “Drive a Global U.”

Mahnan discusses his goal to fill the gap between engineering and clinical research, and the imperative to attract top students and faculty from around the world to come to the University of Minnesota. He is a student in the area of biomechanics and neural control and is advised by Juergen Konczak, Ph.D.

Read Mahnan’s feature here.

 

 

Kinesiology alum Mackenzie Havey will read from her new book, Mindful Running, at U of M Bookstores October 17

School of Kinesiology alumna Mackenzie Lobby Havey, M.A., will read her recently published book, Mindful Running: How Meditative Running Can Improve Performance and Make You a Happier, More Fulfilled Person, at the U of M Bookstore in Coffman Memorial Union on the Minneapolis campus on Tuesday, October 17, at 4 p.m.

In her book, Havey, who is a runner, coach, and fitness journalist, describes her personal experience with meditative running and the influence it has had on her life.

“I discovered that when I integrated the principles of mindfulness into my daily running practice, it boosted my joy in the process of training, as well as my performance, and I wanted to share that in this book,” she says. “As I began to deconstruct my own mindful running routine and talk to Olympians, paralympians, and researchers in the fields of contemplative neuroscience and sports psychology, I found that I wasn’t the only one who had experienced significant benefit from combining mindfulness with physical training. Mindful Running is all about learning to run the mile you are in and train smarter, not harder–to find new ways to relate to your body, mind, and environment to deal with things like discomfort, fatigue, and negative thinking with intentionality and ease. My hope is that some of the lessons learned on the run will find their way into other parts of your life as well.”

Havey graduated with her master’s degree in 2009 in the Sport and Exercise Psychology emphasis area and was advised by Prof. Diane Wiese-Bjornstal. She is currently teaching a Beginning Running class in the School’s Physical Activity Program.

Kinesiology B.S. student Andrew Stelter is semifinalist for 2017 William V. Campbell Trophy

Andrew Stelter, Kinesiology B.S. senior and defensive lineman for the Gopher football team, is a semifinalist for the 2017 William V. Campbell Trophy, a National Football Foundation (NFF) award. The award recognizes the most impressive group of scholar-athletes in college football. Stelter has a current cumulative GPA of 3.61 and serves on the Gopher’s football leadership council. He will graduate in December.

Finalists for the Trophy will be announced November 1. Each will receive an $18,000 postgraduate scholarship as a member of the NFF National Scholar-Athlete Class.

Read the full story here.

 

 

 

Gao and advisees publish in Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy

LaVoi opinion piece on leadership in SportsBusiness Journal

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, has written an opinion piece for the SportsBusiness Journal entitled, “Leadership on the sidelines should not be defined by gender” on women leaders and obstacles they face. The piece invites “leaders in athletics and business who are passionate about increasing the percentage of women in coaching to get involved.”

Christian Science Monitor quotes LaVoi on women coaches

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, is quoted in a Christian Science Monitor piece, “Why there’s been a big drop in women coaches under Title IX” on the phenomena and its logical outcome.

 

National evaluation study of Girls on the Run by Kinesiology professor Maureen Weiss reveals the program transforms young girls’ lives

An independent evaluation study by Maureen Weiss, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology, shows that Girls on the Run, a national physical activity-based positive youth development program for elementary-age girls, has a profound and lasting positive impact on girls’ confidence, competence, connection to others, character, caring, and life skills.

Girls on the Run is a nonprofit organization that uses running as a vehicle for teaching life skills to girls in third through fifth grades. The intentional life skills curriculum and mandatory annual coach training set Girls on the Run apart from other activity programs. The three-part curriculum teaches understanding of self, valuing relationships and teamwork, and exploring one’s connection to the world.

Weiss’s study revealed that:

  • Girls on the Run participants were significantly more likely than girls in organized sport and physical education to learn and use life skills including managing emotions, resolving conflict, helping others or making intentional decisions.
  • 97% of girls said they learned critical life skills at Girls on the Run that they are using at home, at school and with their friends
  • Girls who began the program with below-average scores dramatically improved from pre- to post-season on all outcomes—competence, confidence, connection, character, and caring. This shows that girls who might need a positive youth development program benefited most from their participation.
  • Girls who were the least active before Girls on the Run increased their physical activity level by 40% from pre- to post-season and maintained this increased level beyond the program’s end.

The video and the website illuminate the study findings through an interactive format. The study has also been publicized on Globe Newswire.

“Girls on the Run participants scored higher in managing emotions, resolving conflict, helping others, and making intentional decisions than participants in organized sport or physical education,” said Weiss.  “Being able to generalize skills learned in the program to other situations such as at school or at home is a distinguishing feature of Girls on the Run compared to traditional youth sports and school PE, and suggests that the intentional life skills curriculum and coach-training program can serve as exemplars for other youth programs.”

This study got also mentioned in The Daily Iowan.

The Sportsman article quotes LaVoi on starting athletes at a young age

Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D., Kinesiology senior lecturer and co-director of the Tucker Center, is quoted in an article in The Sportsman, “How Other Sports Have Elevated Roger Federer And Rafael Nadal To The Top Of Their Game.” LaVoi speaks briefly on the efficacy of starting players at a young age.

Javen Ulambayer, Kinesiology B.S. alum, performs in “Moby Dick” in Chicago

A School of Kinesiology alumnus has led an adventurous life since graduating with a B.S. in Kinesiology in Spring 2012 . It’s been a somewhat dangerous one as well.

Javen Ulambayer has taken his education and experience to new heights as he performs in the Ensemble cast in an adaptation of  “Moby Dick” at the Lookingglass Theatre in Chicago. The native of Mongolia moved to the United States in 2005 with his mother, Oyunchimeg “Oyuna” Yadamjav, one of Mongolia’s most famous contortionists,  when she accepted a job at Circus Juventus in St. Paul. The school attracts elite circus performers from around the world to teach their craft. Ulambayer became interested in learning aerial gymnastics and circus arts at the school, and began his practice there. His fascinating story is featured in this Chicago Tribune article.