CEHD News Physical Development & Sport

CEHD News Physical Development & Sport

Barr-Anderson elected to ACSM Board of Trustees

Congratulations to Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, who was elected to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Board of Trustees. She will serve a three-year term ending in 2021. Barr-Anderson is also director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School.

Konczak publishes with Italian partners in Behavioural Brain Research

Jürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory (HSCL), has published a paper with colleagues in Behavioural Brain Research. “Consolidation of human somatosensory memory during motor learning” is a collaboration with colleagues from the Italian Institute of Technology. Dr. Anna Vera Cuppone, first author, spent 9 months in HSCL as a visiting scholar, and the data were collected both at HSCL and in Italy.

The main idea behind the paper is to understand how memory is formed during motor learning. Researchers looked at a form of memory related to body awareness, i.e., “how it feels” when the body performs the newly acquired movement patterns. Research in the last years has recognized that such somatosensory and motor learning go hand-in-hand to form “motor memory.” Researchers show how training body awareness improves skill level. The impact of this work relates to neurorehabilitation, because people with stroke that affects the somatosensory cortex, i.e., the part of the brain involved with somatosensory learning, are the most difficult patients to recover. Sensory-based motor learning may help them to recover faster and more completely.

Dr. Jürgen Konczak
Dr. Anna Vera Cuppone

Barr-Anderson delivers seminar presentation to UW-Madison’s Department of Kinesiology

On March 9, Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented “Halting the Obesity Trajectory: Family-based Interventions for African-American Females” to the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Christiana Raymond-Pope is lead author on article published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Christiana Raymond-Pope, M.S., doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. The article, “Total and segmental body composition examination in collegiate football players using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual x-ray absorptiometry,” examines the influence of player position on the agreement between multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual X-ray absorptiometry when assessing total and segmental percent body fat, fat mass, and fat-free mass in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football athletes. Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., a professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and Tyler Bosch, Ph.D., a graduate of the School of Kinesiology, are also co-authors on the article.

Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell, Kinesiology B.S., awarded UROP grant to work in APAL

Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell, Kinesiology B.S. student, has been awarded a UROP grant that will support her work as an undergraduate research assistant in the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) directed by Thomas Stoffregen, Ph.DHayley’s funded project is “The Role of Chromaticity in the Visual Control of Stance.” Her adviser for the project is Dr. Stoffregen, and she will be working directly with Kinesiology Ph.D. student Ruth Rath.

Japan Times article features Inoue and colleagues

image of Yuhei InoueAn article,”College sports reformers stay positive despite setbacks,” appearing in The Japan Times features Yuhei Inoue, Ph.D., assistant professor of sport management in the School of Kinesiology. The article emphasizes Inoue and colleagues’ joint research project with Japan’s University of Tsukuba, Temple University and Dome Corporation to allow sport teams to be formally recognized as belonging to a university, much as in the U.S. NCAA.

WCCO/CBS MN interviews LaVoi on coaches report card

WCCO/CBS Minnesota has interviewed Tucker Center co-director and School of Kinesiology senior lecturer Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. for the article, “The Report Card: Why Aren’t More Women Coaching Women?” LaVoi talks about the women coaches report card grading, and notes the U of M is only one hire away from an “A” grade.

Spokesman-Recorder on LaVoi’s new hiring report

The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder News Online (MSR) has released an article, “New reports show little progress in college sport race, gender hiring,” featuring the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport’s recently released report, “Head coaches of women’s collegiate teams: A report on seven select NCAA Division-I conferences, 2017-18” authored by Tucker Center co-director and senior lecturer in the School of Kinesiology Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. MSR reporter Charles Hallman quotes LaVoi on the very slight rise in hiring of women head coaches of women’s teams, saying “It’s better than going in reverse.” The article also features The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) report, “Racial and Gender Report Card,” authored by Dr. Richard Lapchick (College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida).

Smith is author of book chapter in Wellbeing in Higher Education

Thomas Smith, Ph.D., adjunct instructor in the School of Kinesiology, is the author of a chapter in a newly published book by Routledge, Wellbeing in Higher Education: Cultivating a Healthy Lifestyle Among Faculty and Students. Smith’s chapter, “Ergonomic and Ecological Perspectives,” discusses how the design of post-secondary systems influences student wellbeing.

Wellbeining in Higher Education

Greising publishes in Cell Death Discovery

Sarah Greising, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, has published an article in the online journal, Cell Death Discovery. “Multiscale analysis of a regenerative therapy for treatment of volumetric muscle loss injury”  explores the regenerative process of injured skeletal muscles resulting from major traumatic injury. The study results suggest that the pathological response to volumetric muscle loss (VML) injury during the acute stage of the healing response overwhelms endogenous and therapeutic regenerative processes.

School of Kinesiology alumnus featured in Florida Today

Matthew Duffy, a 2013 alumni of the School of Kinesiology, was profiled in Florida Today. Duffy received his B.S. in kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise science. He is currently a clinical integration specialist at Health First’s Pro Health and Fitness Center in Viera, Florida. Duffy works with a variety of patients, including cardiac, post-rehab and people with disabilities, and conducts physical and postural assessments, creates strength training workouts and program design, and assists in flexibility training and assisted stretching.


Dengel and colleagues publish in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

Dr. Don Dengel

Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, and colleagues have published in the online publication, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

The article, “Association between carotid intimates media thickness, age, and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents,” describes their study to determine the relations of measures of carotid intima media thickness with body mass index and cardiovascular risk score in children. The study concluded that maintaining normal levels of adiposity and other risk variables may be useful in preventing early changes associated with preclinical atherosclerosis.


Stoffregen publishes in newest Kinesiology Review issue

Tom Stoffregen, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory,  published in a recent issues of Kinesiology Review. In his article titled “Ecological Physics and the Perceptual Information That Supports Motor Control,” he discusses the nature of perceptual information and implications for kinesiology.

Kinesiology Review is the official publication of the National Academy of Kinesiology (NAK) and the American Kinesiology Association (AKA).


Ozy.com profile of US Hockey’s Hilary Knight quotes Tucker Center’s Kane

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is quoted in an Ozy.com profile of US Olympic Hockey star Hilary Knight, “Team USA’s Hockey Star Has A Higher Goal: Equal Pay.” Kane says “the team’s ability to convert frustration into actionable progress has major historical significance.”

Kane podcast on WiSP Sports: “Limited sport coverage for female athletes”

Dr. Mary Jo Kane

Mary Jo Kane, Ph.D., director of the Tucker Center and professor in the School of Kinesiology, is featured in a WiSP Sports “Talking Point” podcast discussing how sport can be a site of resistance and empowerment for women. The podcast and transcript, “How Women’s Status in Sport is Contained by Men,” is a discussion of Kane’s “perspectives on why women’s sports coverage is so limited and why the focus on women’s athletes tends towards sexual objectification instead of their physical and athletic capacities.” WiSP Sports Radio is the world’s largest podcast network for women’s sport featuring more than 760 episodes and 30 unique shows with a global reach of 1.6 million.


credit – A WiSP Sports Production

Wiese-Bjornstal quoted in corporate publication 3M Particles

Diane Wiese-Bjornstal, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Sports Medicine Psychology Laboratory, is quoted in the article, “Don’t let your injury get the best of you: The role of mental fitness in rehabilitation,” by Janna Fischer. It appears in the online corporate publication, 3M Particles, which features stories about science applied to life. The article discusses the mental challenges of returning from sport- and exercise-related injuries.

Dengel presents at University of Utah

Dr. Don DengelDonald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, presented at the University of Utah in the Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation on February 5. The title of Dr. Dengel’s talk was “Measuring Vascular Function: From Peripheral to Cerebral.”

Barr-Anderson presents at Minne-College in Arizona

Daheia Barr-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of the Behavioral Physical Activity Laboratory (BPAL) in the School of Kinesiology, presented at Minne-College in Arizona held in Scottsdale, AZ, on February 10. The title of her presentation was “Move More to Weigh Less: The Importance of Physical Activity to Address Childhood Obesity.” Also attending were CEHD Dean Jean Quam, Serena Wright, CEHD Sr. Alumni Director, and a number of U of M alumni. Minne-College in Arizona is sponsored by the U of M Alumni Association.

KARE-11 features Tucker Center’s Women Coaches Report in story on National Girls and Women in Sports Day

KARE 11 TV gave a nod to the Tucker Center’s  2017- 18 Head Coaches of Women’s Collegiate Teams: A Report on Seven Select NCAA Division-I Conferences in their story related to the National Girls and Women in Sports Day celebration on February 7. Nicole LaVoi, Ph.D., lecturer in the School of Kinesiology and co-director of the Tucker Center, was interviewed for the story and said the report “hopefully stimulates dialogue, raises awareness, helps to recruit and retain more women in the coaching profession, and holds decision-makers who hire coaches more accountable.”

Dengel shares insight on impact of Olympic Games

With the XXIII Olympic Winter Games opening in Pyeongchang County, South Korea on February 8, Donald R. Dengel, Ph.D., professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology, is quoted on the U of M homepage on the long-term impact the Olympic Games can have on host countries. Read the feature here.

During winter break, Dengel led a course in London, England, about the impact of the 1908, 1948 and 2012 Olympics on the city, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and on sport. He also taught Sport and Politics Collide: 1936 & 1972 German Olympics.